Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-rq46b Total loading time: 0.332 Render date: 2022-11-30T23:12:33.373Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

7 - Trophic dynamics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 January 2010

Dave Checkley
Affiliation:
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
Jürgen Alheit
Affiliation:
Baltic Sea Research Institute, University of Rostock, Germany
Yoshioki Oozeki
Affiliation:
National Research Institute of Fisheries Science, Japan
Claude Roy
Affiliation:
Centre IRD de Bretagne, France
Get access

Summary

Summary

Literature on the trophic ecology of small pelagic fish (primarly anchovy Engraulis spp. and sardine Sardinops spp. but including the genera Brevoortia, Clupea, Sardina, Sprattus, and Strangomera) and their interactions with plankton are reviewed using case studies describing research on some economically and ecologically important small pelagic fish from up-welling and temperate non-upwelling ecosystems. Information from morphological studies of the feeding apparatus, field studies on dietary composition and foraging behaviour, and laboratory studies that have provided data for the parameterization of bio-energetic and other models of these small pelagic fish are presented, where available. Two or more small pelagic fish species are described in each case study, and disparities in trophic dynamics between co-occurring anchovy and sardine are consistently seen, supporting the hypothesis that species alternations between the two species could be trophically mediated. Linkages between climate and fish are described for many of the systems, and possible impacts of climate change on some of the species are described.

Introduction

Small pelagic fish are, in general, microphagous planktivores, and their high abundance levels in upwelling systems, in particular, was attributed to their ability to feed directly on phytoplankton and hence benefit from a short and efficient food chain (Ryther, 1969; Walsh, 1981). This two-step food chain hypothesis, with small pelagic fish being regarded as essentially phytophagus and feeding on large, chain forming diatoms such as Chaetoceros and Fragilaria (Yoneda and Yoshida, 1955; Bensam, 1964; Loukashkin, 1970; King and Macleod, 1976) was initially well supported (Longhurst, 1971; Durbin, 1979; Walsh, 1981).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
49
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×