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7 - Linguistic Phylogenetics and Words for Metals in Indo‑European

from Part II - Migratory Processes and Linguistic Dispersals between Yamnaya and the Corded Ware

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2023

Kristian Kristiansen
Affiliation:
Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden
Guus Kroonen
Affiliation:
Universiteit Leiden
Eske Willerslev
Affiliation:
University of Copenhagen
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Summary

The prehistoric spread of Indo-European languages across Europe and Asia was a process with dramatic consequences that are still being felt in the modern world.1 Today around half the world’s population speak an Indo-European language; some of the most widely spoken are Spanish, English, Hindi, Portuguese, Bengali, and Russian. The Indo-European languages are grouped into ten major subgroups, or branches: Italic, Celtic, Germanic, Greek, Armenian, Albanian, Indo-Iranian, and Balto-Slavic, as well as Anatolian and Tocharian (both extinct). These branches all descend from a common ancestor, Proto-Indo-European.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Indo-European Puzzle Revisited
Integrating Archaeology, Genetics, and Linguistics
, pp. 93 - 104
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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