Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-bmzkg Total loading time: 0.937 Render date: 2022-07-04T01:26:18.401Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

36 - Technologies of Contraception and Abortion

from Part V - Reproduction Centre Stage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2018

Nick Hopwood
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Rebecca Flemming
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Lauren Kassell
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Get access

Summary

The oral contraceptive pill still dominates histories of technology in the ‘sexual revolution’. ‘The pill’ was revolutionary for many, though by no means all women in the West, but there have always been alternatives and looking globally yields a different picture. By examining not only past innovations, but also the establishment and maintenance of a range of contraceptive and abortive practices around the world, this chapter reconsiders some widely held assumptions about what counts as revolutionary and for whom. The first two sections consider how demand for contraception and abortion was at first largely met by non-medical commercial suppliers and then, especially after 1960, by medical doctors supported by states and NGOs. The second half of the chapter is concerned with new surgical techniques of sterilization and abortion, then often made available through the population control and feminist movements, as well as prescription-only abortion and ‘morning-after’ pills, controversial drugs that reignited old debates about the boundary between contraception and abortion. The chapter concludes that, while the ‘sexual revolution’ did not see the sharp break in behaviours that is often imagined, public debates around ‘the pill’ did engender a much greater openness about technologies of contraception and abortion.
Type
Chapter
Information
Reproduction
Antiquity to the Present Day
, pp. 535 - 552
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×