Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-p6h7k Total loading time: 0.324 Render date: 2022-05-24T10:11:32.986Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

4 - The Demise of Mexico's One-Party Dominant Regime: Elite Choices and the Masses in the Establishment of Democracy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2012

Beatriz Magaloni
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor of Political Science, Stanford University
Frances Hagopian
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
Scott P. Mainwaring
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
Get access

Summary

The Mexican Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI; Institutional Revolutionary Party) was one of the most resilient autocrats in the world, holding office uninterruptedly for seventy years. Unlike single parties in most of Africa and the former Soviet bloc, the PRI stayed in power without constitutionally banning opposition parties or employing systematic repression. If we were to take Przeworski's dictum that “democracy is a system in which parties lose elections” (1991: 10), Mexico can unquestionably not be classified as democratic until 2000, when the PRI lost the presidency. Thus, from the onset of the democratization wave that swept the Latin American region starting in 1980, it took Mexico more than twenty years to democratize.

Why was the PRI so resilient? What accounts for its ultimate demise? In this chapter, I emphasize three sources of the PRI's capacity to survive: (a) the party's relative immunity to elite splitting; (b) the authoritarian nature of electoral institutions; and (c) the party's massive electoral support. I then explore how each of these pillars of the PRI regime was transformed, eventually leading to the establishment of democracy.

The chapter starts by placing the Mexican transition in comparative perspective. The democratization dynamics of one-party-dominant systems is different from other regime transitions. In transitions from military regimes and personal dictators, the main challenge the opposition faces is the threat of coercion.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Third Wave of Democratization in Latin America
Advances and Setbacks
, pp. 121 - 146
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
5
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×