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Chapter 9 - Collaborative Recovery Model

From Mental Health Recovery to Wellbeing

from Section 2 - What Does a Wellbeing Orientation Mean in Mental Health Services?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2017

Mike Slade
Affiliation:
King's College London
Lindsay Oades
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Aaron Jarden
Affiliation:
Auckland University of Technology
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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