Skip to main content
×
Home
The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women's Writing
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 5
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Baldwin, Anna 2016. An Introduction to Medieval English Literature. p. 124.

    Maude, Kathryn 2014. Citation and marginalisation: the ethics of feminism in Medieval Studies. Journal of Gender Studies, Vol. 23, Issue. 3, p. 247.


    Williams, Tara 2009. “As thu wer a wedow”: Margery Kempe's Wifehood and Widowhood. Exemplaria, Vol. 21, Issue. 4, p. 345.


    Warren, Nancy Bradley 2007. Feminist Approaches to Middle English Religious Writing: The Cases of Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich. Literature Compass, Vol. 4, Issue. 5, p. 1378.


    Black, Nancy B. 2004. RECENT PUBLICATIONS. Women's Studies, Vol. 33, Issue. 1, p. 141.


    ×
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women's Writing
    • Online ISBN: 9780511999123
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL052179188X
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to? *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women's Writing seeks to recover the lives and particular experiences of medieval women by concentrating on various kinds of texts: the texts they wrote themselves as well as texts that attempted to shape, limit, or expand their lives. The first section investigates the roles traditionally assigned to medieval women (as virgins, widows, and wives); it also considers female childhood and relations between women. The second section explores social spaces, including textuality itself: for every surviving medieval manuscript bespeaks collaborative effort. It considers women as authors, as anchoresses 'dead to the world', and as preachers and teachers in the world staking claims to authority without entering a pulpit. The final section considers the lives and writings of remarkable women, including Marie de France, Heloise, Joan of Arc, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, and female lyricists and romancers whose names are lost, but whose texts survive.

Reviews

‘While The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women's Writing comprehensiveness makes it valuable as an introduction to the field, individual articles such as Summit’s, as well as Christopher Cannon’s argument in ‘enclosure’ for anchoritic life and literature as ‘crucial arenas in which the modern self was first defined and mapped’ will also recommend this volume as are source for advanced scholars.’

Source: Arthuriana

‘Dinshaw and Wallace are to be congratulated for achieving excellent coverage of the subject, and for producing a volume which more than meets the high standards set by others in this series.’

Source: Women’s History Magazine

‘… a significant overview of women‘s writing during the Middle Ages …‘.

Source: Sixteenth Century Journal

'Readers with an interest in medieval women's writing will find plenty of stimulating and original material in this new companion.'

Source: Anglia

'… the volume offers an impressive range of essays representing a variety of methodologies and perspectives. … the volume makes an equal worthy read from beginning to end …'

Source: Envoi

    • Aa
    • Aa
Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send:
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 3187 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 3426 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 22nd October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.