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The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the American South
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    The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of the American South
    • Online ISBN: 9781139568241
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCO9781139568241
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Book description

This Companion maps the dynamic literary landscape of the American South. From pre- and post-Civil War literature to modernist and civil rights fictions and writing by immigrants in the 'global' South of the late-twentieth and twenty-first centuries, these newly commissioned essays from leading scholars explore the region's established and emergent literary traditions. Touching on poetry and song, drama and screenwriting, key figures such as William Faulkner and Eudora Welty, and iconic texts such as Gone with the Wind, chapters investigate how issues of class, poverty, sexuality and regional identity have textured Southern writing across generations. The volume's rich contextual approach highlights patterns and connections between writers while offering insight into the development of Southern literary criticism, making this Companion a valuable guide for students and teachers of American literature, American studies and the history of storytelling in America.

Reviews

'This collection has strengths in its essays treating the chronological divisions of this field, but it also considers newly developed approaches, including queer and transnational ones … A helpful bibliographical guide to the various divisions is independent of the essays’ notes … Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty.'

T. Bonner, Jr Source: Choice

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Further Reading

Region and Genre

Cox, Karen L. Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2011.
Greeson, Jennifer. Our South: Geographic Fantasy and the Rise of National Literature. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2010.
Guterl, Matthew Pratt. American Mediterranean: Southern Slaveholders in the Age of Emancipation. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008.
Handley, George. Postslavery Literatures in the Americas: Family Portraits in Black and White. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000.
Inge, M. Thomas and Ed Piacentino, eds. Southern Frontier Humor: An Anthology. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2010.
Johnson, Sherita L. Black Women in New South Literature and Culture. New York: Routledge, 2009.
Jones, Paul Christian. Unwelcome Voices: Subversive Fiction in the Antebellum South. Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 2005.
Ladd, Barbara. Nationalism and the Color Line in George W. Cable, Mark Twain, and William Faulkner. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1996.
Piacentino, Ed. “New Explorations of Antebellum Southern Humor.” Mississippi Quarterly 64.3-4 (2011): 597–610.
Romine, Scott. The Narrative Forms of Southern Community. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1999.
Rubin, Louis D.Edge of the Swamp: A Study in the Literature and Society of the Old South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Rubin Jr., Louis D., Blyden Jackson, Rayburn S. Moore, Lewis P. Simpson. and Thomas Daniel Young eds The History of Southern Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1985.
Simpson, Lewis P. The Brazen Face of History: Studies in the Literary Consciousness in America. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980.
Weaks, Mary Louise, and Carolyn Perry. Southern Women’s Writing: Colonial to Contemporary. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1995.
Wilson, Charles Reagan. Baptized in Blood: The Religion of the Lost Cause, 1865–1920. Athens: The University of Georgia Press, 2009.

Slave and Neo-Slave Narratives

Andrews, William L. To Tell a Free Story: The First Century of Afro-American Autobiography, 1760–1865. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1986.
Andrews, William L., Frances Smith Foster, and Trudier Harris, eds. The Oxford Companion to African American Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.
Beaulieu, Elizabeth Anne. Black Women Writers and the American Neo-Slave Narrative: Femininity Unfettered. Santa Barbara: Praeger, 1999.
Bell, Bernard W. The Afro-American Novel and Its Tradition. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1987.
Davis, Charles T. and Henry Louis GatesJr., eds. The Slave’s Narrative. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985;
Dubey, Madhu.Signs and Cities: Black Literary Postmodernism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.
Fisch, Audrey A., ed. The Cambridge Companion to the African American Slave Narrative. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Graham, Maryemma, ed. The Cambridge Companion to the African American Novel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Keizer, Arlene B. Black Subjects: Identity Formation in the Contemporary Narrative of Slavery. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004.
Mitchell, Angelyn. The Freedom to Remember. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2002.
Rody, Caroline. The Daughter’s Return. African and Caribbean Women’s Fictions of History. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.
Rushdy, Ashraf H. A. Neo-Slave Narratives. Studies in the Social Logic of a Literary Form. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
Rushdy, Ashraf H. ARemembering Generations: Race and Family in Contemporary African American Fiction. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.
Ryan, Tim A. Calls and Responses: The American Novel of Slavery since Gone with the Wind. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2008.
Sekora, John and Darwin T. Turner, eds. The Art of Slave Narrative: Original Essays in Criticism and Theory. Macomb: Western Illinois University Press, 1982.
Sievers, Stephanie. Liberating Narratives. The Authorization of Black Female Voices in African American Women Writers’ Novels of Slavery. Hamburg: Lit Verlag, 1999.
Spaulding, Timothy. Re-Forming the Past : History, the Fantastic, and the Postmodern Slave Narrative. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2005.

Literature and the Civil War

Bernath, Michael T.Confederate Minds: The Struggle for Intellectual Independence in the Civil War South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010.
Blight, David. Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.
Bonner, Robert E.Mastering America: Southern Slaveholders and the Crisis of American Nationhood. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
Carnes, Mark C., Ted Mico, John Miller-Monzon, and David Rubel, eds. Past Imperfect: History According to the Movies. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1995.
Fahs, Alice. The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861–1865. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.
Fahs, Alice, and Joan Waugh, eds. The Memory of the Civil War in American Culture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.
Fields, Annie A., ed. Life and Letters of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Whitefish: Kessinger Publishing, 2004.
Foote, Shelby. The Civil War, 3 vols. London: Pimlico, 1992.
Fuller, Randall. From Battlefields Rising: How the Civil War Transformed American Literature. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Hutchison, Coleman, Apples & Ashes: Literature, Nationalism, and the Confederate States of America. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012.
Kaufman, Will. The Civil War in American Culture. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006.
Lang, Robert, ed. The Birth of a Nation. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1994.
Loewen, James W. and Edward H. Sebesta, eds. The Confederate and Neo-Confederate Reader: The “Great Truth” about the “Lost Cause.”Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2010.
McPherson, James M. Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.
Nickels, Cameron. Civil War Humor. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2010.
Panabaker, James. Shelby Foote and the Art of History: Two Gates to the City. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2004.
Toplin, Robin Brent, ed., Ken Burns’s The Civil War: Historians RespondNew York: Oxford University Press, 1996.
Warren, Craig A. Scars to Prove It: The Civil War Soldier and American Fiction. Kent: Kent State University Press, 2009.
Watson, Jay.Reading for the Body: The Recalcitrant Materiality of Southern Fiction, 1893-1985. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012.

Literature and Reconstruction

Blight, David.American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011.
Brodhead, Richard. Cultures of Letters: Scenes of Reading and Writing in Nineteenth Century America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993.
Du Bois, W. E. B. Black Reconstruction in America: An Essay toward a History of the Part Which Black Folk Played in the Attempt to Reconstruct Democracy in America, 1860–1880. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
Fulton, Joe B.The Reconstruction of Mark Twain: How a Confederate Bushwhacker Became the Lincoln of Our Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University, 2010.
González, John Morán. The Troubled Union: Expansionist Imperatives in Post-Reconstruction American Novels. Columbus: The Ohio State University Press, 2010.
Griffin, Martin. Ashes of the Mind: War and Memory in Northern Literature, 1865-1900. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2009.
Guterl, Matthew Pratt, American Mediterranean: Southern Slaveholders in the Age of Emancipation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2008.
Kaplan, Amy. “Nation, Region, Empire.” In The Columbia History of the American Novel: New Views, ed. Emory Elliot. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.
Leiter, Andrew. In the Shadow of the Black Beast: African American Masculinity in the Harlem and Southern Renaissances. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010.
Schmidt, Peter. Sitting in Darkness: New South Fiction, Education, and Rise of Jim Crow Colonialism, 1865–1920. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2008.
Silber, Nina. The Romance of Reunion: Northerners and the South, 1865–1900. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1993.
Taylor, Melanie Benson. Reconstructing the Native South: American Indian Literature and the Lost Cause. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2012.
Woodward, C. Vann. The Strange Career of Jim Crow. New York: Oxford University Press, 1957.

Poetry and Song

Blotner, Joseph. Robert Penn Warren: A Biography. New York: Random House, 1997.
Burt, Stephen. Randall Jarrell and His Age. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003.
Dickey, James. Self-Interviews. New York: Doubleday and Company, 1970.
Jones, Meta DuEwa. The Muse is Music: Jazz Poetry from the Harlem Renaissance to Spoken Word. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2011.
Lofaro, Michael, ed. Agee at 100: Centennial Essays on the Works of James Agee. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2012.
Moffett, Joe. Understanding Charles Wright. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2008.
Salvaggio, Ruth. Hearing Sappho in New Orleans: The Call of Poetry from Congo Square to the Ninth Ward. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2012.
Turner, Daniel Cross. Southern Crossings: Poetry, Memory, and the Transcultural South. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2012.
Underwood, Thomas A. Allen Tate: Orphan of the South. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.
Warren, Robert Penn. “The Art of Fiction No 18.” Interview conducted with Ralph Ellison and Eugene Walter. Paris Review. Spring/Summer 1957, no. 16: 112–140.
Watkins, Floyd C. and John T. Hiers. Robert Penn Warren Talking: Interviews, 1950–1978. New York: Random House, 1980.
Wright, Charles. Quarter Notes: Improvisations and Interviews. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1988.

Modernists and Modernity

Baker, Houston. Turning South Again: Re-Thinking Modernism/Re-Reading Booker T. Durham: Duke University Press 2010.
Bartley, Numan V. The New South, 1945–1980: The Story of the South’s Modernization. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995.
Brooks, Cleanth, and Robert Penn Warren. Understanding Fiction. New York: F. S. Crofts, 1943.
Cash, W. J. The Mind of the South. New York: Vintage, 1991.
Dolinar, Bryan.The Black Cultural Front: Black Writers and Artists of the Depression Generation. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2012.
Duck, Leigh Anne. The Nation’s Region: Southern Modernism, Segregation, and U.S. Nationalism. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006.
Gray, Richard. The Literature of Memory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977.
Guinn, Matthew. After Southern Modernism. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2000.
Kreyling, Michael. Inventing Southern Literature. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1998.
Ladd, Barbara, Nationalism and the Color Line in George W. Cable, Mark Twain, and William Faulkner. Louisiana State University Press, 1996.
Twelve Southerners. I’ll Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006.
Watts, Trent.One Homogenous People: Narratives of White Southern Identity, 1890-1920. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2010.

Poverty and Progress

Ciuba, Gary M. Desire, Violence, and Divinity in Modern Southern Fiction. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2007.
Clabough, Casey.Inhabiting Contemporary Southern and Appalachian Literature: Region and Place in the Twenty-First Century. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2012.
Fite, Gilbert C. Cotton Fields No More: Southern Agriculture, 1865–1980. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1984.
Godden, Richard and Martin Crawford, eds. Reading Southern Poverty Between the Wars, 1918–1939. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006.
Gray, Richard. Southern Aberrations: Writers of the American South and the Problems of Regionalism. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2000.
Harrington, Michael. The Other America: Poverty in the United States. London: Penguin, 1969.
Jones, Jacqueline. The Dispossessed: America’s Underclasses from the Civil War to the Present. New York: Basic Books, 1992.
Jones, Suzanne and Mark Newman, eds. Poverty and Progress in the U.S. South since 1920. Amsterdam: VU University Press, 2006.
Pimpare, Stephen. A People’s History of Poverty in America. New York: The New Press, 2008.
Trezer, Annette. Disturbing Indians: The Archaeology of Southern Fiction. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2007.
Wray, Matt. Not Quite White: White Trash and the Boundaries of Whiteness. Durham: Duke University Press, 2006.
Wray, Matt and Annalee Newitz, eds. White Trash: Race and Class in America. New York: Routledge, 1997.

The Southern Renaissance and the Faulknerian South

Bradbury, John M. Renaissance in the South: A Critical History of the Literature, 1920–1960. University North Carolina Press, 1963.
Brinkmeyer, Robert H., Jr. “The Southern Literary Renaissance.” In A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the US South, eds. Richard Gray and Owen Robinson. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2004.
Fowler, Doreen.Drawing the Line: Boundary Negotiation from Faulkner to Morrison. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013.
Fowler, Doreen and Ann J. Abadie, eds. Faulkner and the Southern Renaissance. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1981.
Godden, Richard. Fictions of Labor: William Faulkner and the South’s Long Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
Jones, Anne Goodwyn. “The Work of Gender in the Southern Renaissance.” In Southern Writers and Their Worlds, eds. Christopher Morris and Steven G. Reinhardt. College Station, TX: A&M Press, 1996.
King, Richard H. A Southern Renaissance: The Cultural Awakening of the American South, 1930–1955. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.
Leiter, Andrew B. In the Shadow of the Black Beast: African American Masculinity in the Harlem and Southern Renaissances. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010.
Manning, Carol S. “Southern Women Writers and the Beginning of the Renaissance.” In The History of Southern Women’s Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2002.
Matthews, John T. William Faulkner: Seeing Through the South. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.
Millichap, Joseph. A Backward Glance: The Southern Renascence: The Autobiographical Epic, and the Classical Legacy. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2009.
Mishkin, Tracy. The Harlem and Irish Renaissances: Language, Identity, and Representation. Gainesville: Florida University Press, 1997.
Polk, Noel.Children of the Dark House: Text and Context in Faulkner. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1998.
Richards, Gary. “‘With a Special Emphasis’: The Dynamics of (Re)Claiming a Queer Southern Renaissance.” Mississippi Quarterly 55 (Spring 2002): 209–229.
Rubin, Louis Jr. and Robert D. Jacobs. Southern Renascence: The Literature of the Modern South. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1953.
Sundquist, Eric. Faulkner: The House Divided. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1983.
Woodward, C. Vann. “Why the Southern Renaissance?” In The Future of the Past. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

Southern Women Writers

Brown, Carolyn J.A Daring Life: A Biography of Eudora Welty. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2012.
Claxton, Mae Miller. Conversations with Dorothy Allison. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2012.
Dyer, Joyce, ed. Bloodroot: Reflections on Place by Appalachian Women Writers. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1998.
Gordon, Sarah, ed. Flannery O’Connor: In Celebration of Genius. Athens, GA: Hill Street Press, 2000.
Henninger, Katherine. Ordering the Façade: Photography and Contemporary Southern Women’s Writing. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007.
Inge, Tonette, ed. Southern Women Writers: The New Generation. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1990.
Jones, Anne Goodwyn. Tomorrow Is Another Day: The Woman Writer in the South, 1859–1936. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995.
Jones, Gayl. Liberating Voices: Oral Tradition in African American Literature. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.
Jones, Suzanne, Race Mixing. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 2006.
Lewis, Nghana Tamu. Entitled to the Pedestal: Place, Race, and Progress in White Southern Women’s Writing, 1920–1945. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2007.
Magee, Rosemary M., ed. Friendship and Sympathy: Communities of Southern Women Writers. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1992.
Manning, Carol S., ed. The Female Tradition in Southern Literature. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993.
McHaney, Pearl Amelia, ed. Eudora Welty: Writers’ Reflections upon First Reading Welty. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2010.
Mills, Fiona, and Keith Mitchell, eds. After the Pain: Critical Essays on Gayl Jones. New York: Peter Lang, 2006.
Monteith, Sharon. Advancing Sisterhood? Interracial Friendships in Contemporary Southern Fiction. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2000.
Perry, Carolyn, and Mary Louise Weaks, ed. The History of Southern Women’s Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2002.
Pollack, Harriet, ed. Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race. Athens: U of Georgia P, 2013.
Polk, Noel.Faulkner and Welty and the Southern Literary Tradition. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2010.
Prenshaw, Peggy Whitman, ed. Women Writers of the Contemporary South. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984.
Prenshaw, Peggy Whitman, ed. Conversations with Eudora Welty. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984.
Prenshaw, Peggy Whitman. Composing Selves: Southern Women and Autobiography. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2011.
Scott, Neil R., and Irwin H. Streight, ed. Flannery O’Connor: Contemporary Reviews. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
Shloss, Carol.Flannery O’Connor’s Dark Comedies: The Limits of Inference. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2012.
Tate, Linda. A Southern Weave of Women: Fiction of the Contemporary South. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994.
Yaeger, Patricia. Dirt and Desire: Reconstructing Southern Women’s Writing, 1930–1990. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Hollywood South

Barker, Deborah and Kathryn McKee, eds. American Cinema in the Southern Imaginary. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2011.
Boon, Kevin Alexander, Script Culture and the American Screenplay. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2008.
Brooker-Bowers, Nancy. The Hollywood Novel and Other Novels about Film, 1912–1982: An Annotated Bibliography. New York: Garland, 1985.
Campbell, Edward D. C., Jr. The Celluloid South: Hollywood and the Southern Myth. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1981.
Couchman, Jeffrey. The Night of the Hunter: A Biography of a Film. Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2009.
Cripps, Thomas. Making Movies Black: The Hollywood Message Movie from World War II to the Civil Rights Era. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.
Dick, Bernard F. Hellman in Hollywood. Rutherford: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1982.
French, Warren, ed. The South and Film. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1981.
Graham, Allison. Framing the South: Hollywood, Television and Race During the Civil Rights Struggle. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.
Graham, Allison and Sharon Monteith, eds. New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Volume 18: Media. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2011.
Heider, Karl G., ed. Images of the South: Constructing a Regional Culture on Film and VideoAthens: University of Georgia Press, 1993.
Kreyling, Michael. The South that Wasn’t There: Postsouthern Memory and History. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010.
Lurie, Peter. Vision’s Impermanence: Faulkner, Film, and the Popular Imagination. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003.
McPherson, Tara. Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender, and Nostalgia in the Imagined South. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003.
McWhirter, David B. “Eudora Welty Goes to the Movies: Modernism, Regionalism, Global. Media.” Modern Fiction Studies 55.1 (2009): 68–91.
Palmer, R. Barton and William Robert Bray. Hollywood’s Tennessee: The Williams Films and Postwar America. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2009.
Price, Steven. The Screenplay: Authorship, Theory and Criticism. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
Romine, Scott. The Real South: Southern Narrative in the Age of Cultural Reproduction. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2008.

Civil Rights Fiction

Dabbs, James McBride. Civil Rights in Recent Southern Fiction. Atlanta: Southern Regional Council, 1969.
Haddox, Thomas. “Elizabeth Spencer, the White Civil Rights Novel, and the Postsouthern.” Modern Language Quarterly 65.4 (2004): 561–581.
Harris, Trudier. “The Power of Martyrdom: The Incorporation of Martin Luther King and His Philosophy into African American Literature.” In Media, Culture and the Modern African Freedom Struggle, ed. Brian Ward. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2001.
King, Richard H. “The Discipline of Fact/ The Freedom of Fiction?Journal of American Studies 25 (1991): 171–188.
King, Richard. H. “Politics and Fictional Representation: The Case of the Civil Rights Movement.” In The Making of Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement, eds. Brian Ward and Anthony Badger. London: Macmillan, 1996.
Melosh, Barbara. “Historical Memory in Fiction: The Civil Rights Movement in Three Novels,” Radical History Review (Winter 1988): 64–76.
Metress, Christopher. “Making Civil Rights Harder: Literature, Memory, and the BlackFreedom Struggle,” The Southern Literary Journal, 40.2 (Spring 2008): 138–150.
Monteith, Sharon. “Revisiting the 1960s in Contemporary Fiction: ‘Where Do We Go From Here?’” In Gender and the Civil Rights Movement, eds. Peter Ling and Sharon Monteith. New Brunswick: Rutgers 2004.
Monteith, Sharon “‘The 1960s Echo On’: Images of Martin Luther King as Deployed by White Writers of Contemporary Fiction.” In Media, Culture and the Modern African Freedom Struggle, ed. Brian Ward. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2001.
Monteith, Sharon “SNCC’s Stories at the Barricades.” In From Sit-Ins to SNCC: Student Civil Rights Protest in the 1960s, eds. Philip Davies and Iwan Morgan. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 2012.
Richardson, Riché. Black Masculinity and the U.S. South: From Uncle Tom to Gangsta. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2007.
Walker, Melissa. Down from the Mountaintop: Black Women’s Novels in the Wake of the Civil Rights Movement, 1966 – 1989. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1991.

Southern Drama

Andreach, Robert J. Understanding Beth Henley. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2006.
Avery, Laurence G. ed. A Paul Green Reader. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
Dunlap, William. A History of American Theatre from Its Origins to 1832. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005.
Fesmire, Julia A., ed. Beth Henley: A Casebook. New York: Routledge, 2002.
Griffin, Alice. Understanding Tennessee Williams. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2011.
Griffin, Alice, and Geraldine Thorsten. Understanding Lillian Hellman. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2010.
Hampton, Wilborn. Horton Foote: America’s Storyteller. New York: Free Press, 2009.
Hutchisson, James M. DuBose Heyward: A Charleston Gentleman and the World of Porgy and Bess. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2000.
Leverich, Lyle. Tom: The Unknown Tennessee Williams. New York: Crown, 1995.
Lott, Eric. Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
McDonald, Robert, and Linda Rohrer Paige, eds. Southern Women Playwrights: New Essays in History and Criticism. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2002.
Miller, Tice L. Entertaining the Nation: American Drama in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2007.
Richards, Jeffrey H. Early American Drama. New York: Penguin, 1997.
Saddik, Annette J. The Politics of Reputation: The Critical Reception of Tennessee Williams’ Later Plays. Madison: Farleigh Dickinson, 1999.
Savran, David. Communists, Cowboys, and Queers: The Politics of Masculinity in the Work of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1992.
Seniors, Paula Marie. Beyond Lift Every Voice and Sing: The Culture of Uplift, Identity, and Politics in Black Musical Theater. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2009.
Stempel, Larry. Showtime: A History of the Broadway Musical Theater. New York: Norton, 2010.
Watson, Charles S. The History of Southern Drama. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1997.

Queering the South

Berland, K. J. H. “William Byrd’s Sexual Lexicography,” Eighteenth-Century Life 23.1 (February 1999): 1–11.
Bibler, Michael P. Cotton’s Queer Relations: Same-Sex Intimacy and the Literature of the Southern Plantation, 1936–1968. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009.
Biggs, Mary. “Si tu savais’: The Gay/Transgendered Sensibility of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening,” Women’s Studies 33 (2004): 145–181.
Brantley, Will. Feminine Sense in Southern Memoir: Smith, Glasgow, Welty, Hellman, Porter, and Hurston. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1993.
Brasell, R. Bruce. “‘The Degeneration of Nationalism’: Colonialism, Perversion, and the American South,” Mississippi Quarterly 56.1 (Winter 2002–2003): 33–54.
Gebhard, Caroline. “Reconstructing Southern Manhood: Race, Sentimentality, and Camp in the Plantation Myth.” In Haunted Bodies: Gender and Southern Texts, eds. Anne Goodwyn Jones and Susan V. Donaldson. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1997.
Howard, John. Men Like That: A Southern Queer History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.
Howard, John, ed. Carryin’ On in the Lesbian and Gay South. New York: New York University Press, 1997.
Johnson, E. Patrick. Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2008.
McRuer, Robert. The Queer Renaissance: Contemporary American Literature and the Reinvention of Lesbian and Gay Identities. New York: New York University Press, 1997.
Morris, Linda A. Gender Play in Mark Twain: Cross-Dressing and Transgression. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2007.
Poteet, William Mark. Gay Men in Modern Southern Literature: Ritual, Initiation, and the Construction of Masculinity. New York: Peter Lang, 2006.
Richards, Gary. Lovers and Beloveds: Sexual Otherness in Southern Fiction, 1936–1961. Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 2005.
Rohy, Valerie. Impossible Women: Lesbian Figures and American Literature. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000.
Saillant, John. “The Black Body Erotic and the Republican Body Politic, 1790–1820.” In Sentimental Men: Masculinity and the Politics of Affect in American Culture, eds. Mary Chapman and Glenn Hendler. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.
Sears, James T. Rebels, Rubyfruit, and Rhinestones: Queering Space in the Stonewall South. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2001.
Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Tendencies. Durham: Duke University Press, 1993.
Somerville, Siobhan. Queering the Color Line: Race and the Invention of Homosexuality in American Culture. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000.
Walters, Ronald G. “The Erotic South: Civilization and Sexuality in American Abolitionism.” American Quarterly 25.2 (May 1973): 177–201.
Wilson, Angelia R.Below the Belt: Sexuality, Religion and the American South. London: Cassell, 2000.
Wise, Benjamin E. William Alexander Percy: The Curious Life of a Mississippi Planter and Sexual Freethinker. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2012.

Immigrant Writers and Transnational South

Appadurai, Arjun. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996.
Bhabha, Homi, ed. Nation and Narration. London: Routledge, 1990.
Benson, Melanie R. Disturbing Calculations: The Economies of Identity in Postcolonial Southern Literature, 1912–2002. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2008.
Bone, Martyn. The Postsouthern Sense of Place in Contemporary Fiction. Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 2005.
Clifford, James and George E. Marcus. Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986.
Cohn, Deborah. History and Memory in the Two Souths: Recent Southern and Spanish American Fiction. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 1999.
Davis, Thadious M. Southscapes: Geographies of Race, Region, & Literature. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2011.
Hahamovitch, Cindy. No Man’s Land: Jamaican Guestworkers in America and the Global History of Deportable Labor. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011.
Hobson, Fred, ed. South to the Future: An American Region in the Twenty-First Century. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2002.
Hollinger, David. Postethnic America: Beyond Multiculturalism. New York Basic Books, 2000.
Humphries, Jefferson, and John Lowe, eds. The Future of Southern Letters. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.
Juncker, Clara, and Russell Duncan, eds. Transnational America: Contours of Modern US Culture. Copenhagen: Museum Tuscalanum, 2004.
King, G., 1996. Mapping Reality: An Exploration of Cultural Geographies. London: Macmillan, 1996.
Lowe, John. “‘Calypso Magnolia’: The Caribbean Side of the South,” South Central Review 22.1 (2005): 54–80.
Lowe, Lisa. Immigrant Acts. Durham: Duke University Press, 1996.
Peacock, James L., Harry L. Watson, and Carrie R. Matthews, eds. The American South in a Global World. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.
Ryan, Maureen. “Outsiders with Inside Information.” In South to a New Place: Region, Literature, Culture, eds. Suzanne W. Jones and Sharon Monteith. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2002.
Smith, Jon and Deborah Cohn, eds. Look Away! The U.S. South in New World Studies. Durham: Duke University Press, 2004.
Wood, Joseph.Vietnamese American Place Making in Northern Virginia,” Geographical Review 87.1 (1997): 58–72.
Yousaf, Nahem. “A Sugar Cage: Poverty and Protest in Stephanie Black’s H-2 Worker.” In Poverty and Progress in the US South since 1920, eds. Suzanne Jones and Mark Newman. Amsterdam: VU University Press, 2006.
Yousaf, Nahem and Sharon Monteith. “Making an Impression: New Immigrant Fiction in the Post-War South,” Modern Language Forum 60.2 (2004): 214–224.
Yousaf, Nahem and Sharon Monteith‘I Was Pearl and My Last Name Was Harbor’: Ethnic Southern Memory and Monique Thuy-Dung Truong’s ‘Kelly’,” North Carolina Literary Review (2004): 113–122.