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  • Cited by 2
  • Cited by
    This chapter has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Renshaw, Steven L. 2011. Celebration of seasonally based holidays and festivals in Japan: a study in cultural adaptation. Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, Vol. 7, Issue. S278, p. 308.

    Joó, Katalin Barczi, Attila Szántó, Zsuzsanna and Horváth, Mihály 2003. A hortobágyi Csípő-halom talajtani vizsgálata. Agrokémia és Talajtan, Vol. 52, Issue. 1-2, p. 5.

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  • Print publication year: 1993
  • Online publication date: March 2008

2 - The Yamato kingdom

Summary
The Yamato kingdom appeared on the Nara plain of central Japan between 250 and 300 AD and, during the next three centuries, passed through successive stages of vigor, expansion, and disruption. Although the Yamato kingdom seems to have had no official relations with Chinese or Korean courts during its first century and a half of vigorous growth, evidence from archaeological sites reveals deep and wide-ranging continental influence. The second part of the Yamato period, roughly the fifth century, was a time of spectacular development. This was when the largest burial mounds were constructed and fairly complex irrigation systems were built. Yamato utilized a growing network of clans and occupational groups to increase its wealth and power. This chapter describes these remarkable changes, giving special attention to the reigns of Nintoku and Yuryaku. The expansion of the Yamato within the Japanese islands during the middle years of this period was intertwined with its political and military involvement in Korean affairs.
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The Cambridge History of Japan
  • Online ISBN: 9781139055062
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521223522
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