Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home
The Cambridge History of Latin America
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 1
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Scodeller, Gabriela 2017. Latin American ‘free-trade unionism’ and the cold War: an analysis based on educational policies. Labor History, Vol. 58, Issue. 3, p. 327.

    ×
  • Volume 6: 1930 to the Present, Part 2: Politics and Society
  • Edited by Leslie Bethell, St Antony's College, Oxford

  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    The Cambridge History of Latin America
    • Volume 6: 1930 to the Present, Part 2: Politics and Society
    • Edited by Leslie Bethell
    • Online ISBN: 9781139055222
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

The second part of Volume 6 of The Cambridge History of Latin America examines the military in Latin American politics; democracy; the Left; labour movements and the urban working class; rural mobilisation and violence. It also takes a look at the role of women in twentieth-century Latin American economy, society, and politics. The volume finishes with a discussion of the actions and importance of the Catholic and Protestant churches.

Reviews

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×
  • 1 - State organization in Latin America since 1930
    pp 1-96
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.002
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter surveys more than half a century in the development of state organization in twenty formally sovereign republics of Latin America. It explains about specific aspects of state organization such as territorial control, public employment, command over resources, administration and postscript on citizenship of Latin America, and considers the administrative innovations and the economic instruments that accompanied this implantation of formal controls from the centre. The chapter illustrates what the assertion of territorial control could mean to the Mexican revolutionaries. All forms of state organization can be viewed from three perspectives: the control of territory, administration of people, and management or control of resources. The chapter surveys the transformation of Latin American states in the half century following 1930 in the areas of taxation, state ownership, and economic regulation. It underlines that even in the early 1990s full citizenship remained an elusive and weakly administered aspiration for most of the population under study.
  • 2 - Democracy in Latin America since 1930
    pp 97-162
    • By Jonathan Hartlyn, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Arturo Valenzuela, Professor of Government, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.003
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Latin America has often been viewed as a continent where in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the formal architecture of democracy has been a thinly veiled facade for civilian and military tyrants who have imposed their will on conservative and backward peoples. This chapter reviews the experience of the eight Latin American countries with the most democratic experience in the twentieth century in the context of two historical cycles: from the late 1920s to the late 1950s and from the late 1950s to the late 1980s. It discusses presidential constitutionalism, elections, suffrage and democratic experiences of Latin American. The chapter focuses on broad themes of constitutional development in Latin America and especially what is called the dilemma of presidentialism. It elucidates how parties and party systems are crucial to the evolution of political democracy in Latin America, so is the existence of regular, free, fair and open competitive elections.
  • 3 - The Left in Latin America since c. 1920
    pp 163-232
    • By Alan Angell, University Lecturer in Latin American Politics and Fellow, St. Antony's College, Oxford
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.004
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter discusses the history of the Left, since 1920, in Latin America by focusing on the Communist and Socialist parties. Communism in Latin America was under the ideological and tactical tutelage of the Communist International (Comintern) from the time of its formation in 1919 until its demise in 1943. During the Second World War, communist movements in Latin America enjoyed unusually high prestige and tolerance as a result of their involvement in anti-fascist movements and admiration for the war efforts of the Soviet Union. The Cold War saw intense U.S. pressure to curb reform movements of any kind that might be identified with the Left. The Cuban Revolution coincided with a period of tension in international communism, as relations between the Soviet Union and China deteriorated. With the debt crisis of the 1980s growth came to an abrupt halt, and income inequalities worsened.
  • 4 - The military in Latin American politics since 1930
    pp 233-304
    • By Alain Rouquie, Centre d'Etude et de Recherche Internationale, Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques, Paris, Stephen Suffern, Paris
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.005
  • View abstract
    Summary
    The upheaval in the world economic and political order associated with the 1929 Depression inaugurated an intensely turbulent period in the politics of Latin America. This chapter discusses the involvement of military in the overthrow of governments in Latin American nations such as Argentina, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Bolivia, Peru and Guatemala. It details the role of the armed forces in historical evolution. The chapter also talks about models and mechanisms of contemporary militarism, which was not pre-ordained either historically or geographically. The civilian states including Costa Rica, Venezuela, Mexico and Colombia can doubtless teach us some useful lessons on the relations between the military and politics in Latin American societies. Contemporary Latin American militarism should be understood, according to counter-insurgency policy formulation, as the heir to and continuator of yesterday's caudillismo, which arose out of anarchy of the wars of independence.
  • 5 - The urban working class and labour movement in Latin America since 1930
    pp 305-378
    • By Ian Roxborough, Professor of Sociology and Professor of History, State University of New York at Stony Brook
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.006
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter is primarily concerned with the labour movement narrowly defined. It presents a number of references to the links between labour and broader social movements throughout, particularly with regard to the tensions between labour and the pro-democracy movements of the 1940s and with regard to the increasingly close, and still problematic links between organized labour and urban social movements in the 1960s and 1970s. The chapter discusses the urban working class and labour movement in Latin America since 1930. The impact of the 1929 Depression on the working population of Latin America was profound, largely depending on the political repercussions of the economic crisis and on the extent to which import substituting industrialization emerged as a stimulus to employment growth. This chapter reflects natural bias in studies of Latin American labour movements, suggesting a greater degree of commonality of experience than would be the case had more attention been devoted to the smaller countries of the region.
  • 6 - Rural mobilizations in Latin America since c. 1920
    pp 379-482
    • By Guillermo de la Peña, Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropologia Social de Occidente, Guadalajara
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.007
  • View abstract
    Summary
    Political mobilization and social violence have been recurrent phenomena in rural Latin America in the twentieth century. This chapter pays particular attention to those countries where the sheer number and scale of uprisings have made the whole world aware of their relevance. It tries to show how different social movements represent the variability of social groups in the countryside and their grievances, attempted solutions, alliances and outcomes. The chapter makes sense of both similarity and diversity. The cases presented for the decade 1920 to 1930 illustrate different forms of relationships among peasants and rural workers on the old hand, and caudillos, caciques and heterogeneous political actors on the other, in the context of changing national political structures in Spanish America. The period from 1930 to 1960 was one of profound economic and political change in Latin America. After the failure of the guerrillas in Peru in the early 1960s, the military regime from 1968-80 implemented an agrarian reform programme.
  • 7 - Women in twentieth-century Latin American society
    pp 483-544
    • By Asunción Lavrin, Professor of History, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.008
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter discusses significant changes in legal status, education, participation in the labour force, citizenship and political participation of Latin American women in the twentieth century. It explains how the industrialization of cotton crops gave a new character to the work of rural women from the 1940s. The working women were responsive to labour movements representing their economic interests, and have shown willingness to collaborate with men to the extent permitted them as newcomers to social mobilization. The chapter explains participation of the women in the political process in increasingly large numbers. Eva Peron's political career developed during the period when suffrage was discussed and granted to most Latin American women, making the political mobilization of the female sex a new historical reality. It reveals that women's participation in the labour market and women's formal education helped bring about major changes in the legal status of women, despite shortcomings in the enforcement of the law.
  • 8 - The Catholic Church in Latin America since 1930
    pp 545-582
    • By Enrique Dussel, President, Comisión de Estudios de Historia de la Iglesia en América Latina (CEHILA), Mexico, D.F.
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.009
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter discusses the domination and major influence of the Catholic Church in the religious and cultural life and in the political and economic life of Latin America during 300 years of colonial rule. It outlines new approaches with regard to such priorities as neighbourhood pastoral activity, the liturgy, the training of clergymen and the role and functions of the priesthood. The chapter details a historic movement that linked the institutional Church and the Christian people themselves on the level of their day-to-day suffering for the first time since the end of the colonial period. The Christian Base Communities voiced popular criticism of the 'structural injustice' of the political, economic and social system. The Catholic Church in the late 1980s and early 1990s realigned with the newly democratic regimes in the southern half of Latin America and identified itself with moves towards democratic consolidation in the northern half.
  • 9 - The Protestant churches in Latin America since 1930
    pp 583-604
    • By José Bonino, Instituto Superior Evangélico de Estudios Teológicos (ISEDET), Buenos Aires
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.010
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This chapter discusses Protestant churches that historically and/or doctrinally trace their origins to the sixteenth-century Reformation. Following a widely accepted typology of Protestantism in Latin America include three main streams such as immigrant groups, missionary Protestantism and Pentecostalism. The chapter talks about the creation of a sense of identity and developing forms of communication and co-ordination among the emerging Protestant churches by the Panama Congress. The national security regimes in Brazil and Argentina found support in some Protestant churches and leaders while other Protestant churches and leaders were in the forefront of struggle for human rights against these regimes. The chapter also outlines the remarkable growth of Latin American Protestantism from the late 1970s, which re-opened the old discussion of the relation between Protestantism, capitalism and US economic and political imperialism. With all its ambiguities, conflicts and divisions, Protestantism has become an integral part of the religious field in Latin America since 1930.
  • Bibliographical essays
    pp 605-708
  • https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521465564.011
  • View abstract
    Summary
    This bibliography presents an exhaustive list of articles relevant to understanding the history of Latin America from ca. 1500 to the present day. These titles examine the profound political, economic, and social changes experienced by Brazil in the 70 years from 1930 to the present day. The titles presented focus on topics such as the state organization, democracy and the military establishments in Latin America since 1930, and on the urban working class and labour movement in Latin America, and the position of women in twentieth-century Latin American society. The essay also includes a few titles which focus on the Catholic and Protestant churches in Latin America since 1930. The country-specific bibliographical essays provide references to the essential country-specific literature on such issues as the history of democracy, political parties, elections and public policy.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed