Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home
The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 7
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Connolly, Margaret 2019. Sixteenth-Century Readers, Fifteenth-Century Books.

    Driver, Martha W. 2017. The Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature in Britain. p. 1.

    2014. A Companion to British Literature. p. 418.

    Bell, David N. 2014. A Companion to British Literature. p. 355.

    Snook, Edith 2013. Recent Studies in Early Modern Reading. English Literary Renaissance, Vol. 43, Issue. 2, p. 343.

    Weedon, Alexis 2008. A Companion to the History of the Book. p. 33.

    Woolfson, Jonathan 2002. Reassessing Tudor Humanism. p. 1.

    ×

Book description

This volume of The Cambridge History of the Book in Britain presents an overview of the century-and-a-half between the death of Chaucer in 1400 and the incorporation of the Stationers' Company in 1557. The profound changes during that time in social, political and religious conditions are reflected in the dissemination and reception of the written word. The manuscript culture of Chaucer's day was replaced by an ambience in which printed books would become the norm. The emphasis in this collection of essays is on the demand and use of books. Patterns of ownership are identified as well as patterns of where, why and how books were written, printed, bound, acquired, read and passed from hand to hand. The book trade receives special attention, with emphasis on the large part played by imports and on links with printers in other countries, which were decisive for the development of printing and publishing in Britain.

Reviews

‘This volume and its successors should have a place in any library concerned with British history, for it convincingly demonstrates the contribution of books at a critical time.'

Peter Hoare - Library Association

‘… undoubtedly the definitive book on the subject.'

Source: Journal of Documentation

Refine List

Actions for selected content:

Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Contents


Page 1 of 2


  • 1 - Literacy, books and readers
    pp 31-44
  • View abstract

    Summary

    An overall growth in the ability to read and write English during our period is certain enough. To what precise extent the same applies to Latin literacy is less clear. That books large and small were composed is beyond dispute. That there was a reading public for them, varying in size from one person to many, from book to book and according to means, motive and opportunity, is therefore equally certain. Church institutions recognize the danger of misorder and abusion in Church and state implicit in the ability to read. The confiscations and bonfires of books under Wolsey and Cuthbert Tunstal, Bishop of London, in the 1520s, the warnings to booksellers, the processes against De Worde, Berthelet and others in the 1520s and 1530s and the rest, all imply a readership, if of indeterminate size, at least with determination to read. So do known instances of the prosecution of known individual readers.
  • 2 - Foreign illuminators and illuminated manuscripts
    pp 45-64
  • View abstract

    Summary

    No account of the history of the manuscript book in Britain in the fifteenth century would be complete without a discussion of the extent to which foreigners were involved in the native book trade, and of the several manuscripts written and illuminated abroad which were imported at this time. This chapter distinguishes five classes of production and/or importation of books. First, foreign illuminators may have themselves migrated to work in England. Secondly, manuscripts may have been made abroad and then imported and sold in England speculatively to buyers who had not specifically commissioned them. Thirdly, owners may have acquired manuscripts abroad and brought them back to England. Fourthly, manuscripts may have been sent from abroad as gifts. Fifthly, manuscripts may have been specially commissioned abroad by owners who remained in or returned to England. In the later Middle Ages, certain major patrons attached illuminators to themselves as household servants, the Duke de Berry being a well-known example.
  • 3 - Printing
    pp 65-108
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Printing had forced the book-trade rapidly to develop channels by which to market the merchandise that could now be produced on a big scale. In the medieval England, book production was almost entirely dependent on materials, techniques and skills brought in from overseas. Typographers and printers had to decide what was relevant to convey their message, and what variant forms could be dispensed with. A set of conventions regarding styles of type was developed early and was based on distinctions made in scribal traditions. In the period up to 1557 (and long after), printers in England and Scotland were almost fully dependent on the printing types that could be obtained from suppliers on the Continent. The printing press was a less sensational invention than that of movable type, and developed over the first decades of printing. Procedure and practice could vary considerably between different countries, towns and individual printing houses.
  • 4 - Bookbinding 1400–1557
    pp 109-127
  • View abstract

    Summary

    This chapter discusses bookbinding in Britain during the period 1400-1557 by giving a general picture, drawing on surviving evidence, while also indicating some of the variations in practice that can be found. The materials most frequently used for end-leaves at this time were vellum or parchment and plain white paper. Late in the fifteenth century, parchment end-leaves were gradually replaced by paper. The shape of a binding and the way it was constructed depended to a large extent on its function and on the way the book was stored. The boards of fifteenth-century bindings were usually made of wood, although limp and semi-limp vellum or parchment bindings are also found. The most common covering material was tanned leather, usually calf, sometimes sheep, while tanned goatskin was occasionally used for fine bindings from the 1540s onwards. Towards the end of the fifteenth century, cheaper structures and less time-consuming practices were developed to keep pace with the increase in book production.
  • 5 - The rise of London’s book-trade
    pp 128-147
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Any study of the late medieval history of the book in Britain must eventually turn to London where, from the fifteenth century onwards, the book trade made the City dominant in national book commerce. In City of London archives, the first mention of the trade is in 1403, when various book craftsmen sought to form a common fraternity. Migration to Paternoster Row or to streets and lanes nearby continued steadily throughout the fifteenth century; as many as 136 stationers and book artisans, at various times, established business premises and residence in the environs of St Paul's. As security for a book order or for craft services provided to a customer, some form of agrement or acorde was required by a stationer or by an artisan directly engaged by the customer. William Caxton's death, probably in the early spring or late winter of 1492, marks the beginning of a new phase in London's developing market for printed books.
  • 6 - The customs rolls as documents for the printed-book trade in England
    pp 148-163
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The importation of early printed books into England was not an interesting sideline, but a primary factor in the history of the English book-trade. The richest single resource for assessing the scale of imported books is the series of customs accounts, both national and local, of London and other ports. This chapter presents a survey of the evidence for book importation residing in England's and London's customs records through 1557. There is an extensive body of relevant data which contributes significantly to the picture of England's printed-book trade during its first generations. To see the data in their appropriate context, the chapter analyzes several background topics: the dutiable distinctions between natives of England, general aliens, and Hansards; the survival rate of the customs rolls; the quantification of books on the customs rolls; and the customs duty on books.
  • 7 - The book-trade under Edward VI and Mary I
    pp 164-178
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The reigns of Edward VI (1547-53) and Mary I (1553-8) exemplify sharply contrasting responses to the use of the book-trade as an ideological and political instrument and to the dissemination of religious propaganda. A massive amount of publication appeared during the early part of Edward VI's reign, when English printers produced books at a higher rate than at any point since William Caxton's establishment of the first English printing press. Protestant propaganda comprised the great bulk of the flood of Edwardian publication. Provincial printing was a distinctive feature of the Edwardian booktrade. Mary's coronation heralded defeat for the Protestant reformers in England. A sequence of proclamations, injunctions and other measures forbade the printing and sale of works of religious controversy. Parliament also revived the medieval statutes against heresy. Under Mary, reformist printers and publishers reverted to the Henrician practice of relying upon surreptitious publication. The chapter also gives the STC statistical data of book production for the years 1547-1558.
  • 8 - Importation of printed books into England and Scotland
    pp 179-202
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Unlike manuscripts, which were produced in England and Scotland as well as on the Continent, no printed books were produced on native soil before William Caxton set up his shop in Westminster in 1476. This chapter treats England and Scotland separately in the discussion of the importation of books. They were separate countries, had different foreign alliances, different trade routes and looked to different intellectual centres. The imported books themselves underline these differences. If the individual centres of printing for patterns of importation to England are examined, Venice emerges as the leading supplier of books, followed by Paris, Basel, Cologne, Lyons, Strasbourg and Nuremberg. For Scotland, Venice dominates in both importation and production in the 1480s, but in the 1490s is almost on a par with Paris. There is no dramatic leap in the 1490s, but rather a sharp, then steady, rise in imports from France and Germany after 1500.
  • 9 - Private ownership of printed books
    pp 203-228
  • View abstract

    Summary

    This chapter is based on a sample of over 4,300 printed books which bear clear evidence of having been in private ownership in Britain before 1557. It examines who owned books, what books they owned and what factors influenced that ownership. Apart from availability, the primary factors influencing book ownership were need and means. Several features of book ownership overall emerge from the sample, in Scotland as well as in England. On a basic level, people owned books which they needed: books were professional tools. For lay owners, such as the gentry and merchants, social networks influenced their ownership of books. In addition to demonstrating by the sheer quantity of certain texts that need determines book ownership, the books by and on Aristotle highlight the features of book ownership in England. Students in the higher faculty of theology would have needed texts of systematic theology, but students of all levels needed more humble texts of pastoral theology.
  • 10 - Monastic libraries: 1400–1557
    pp 229-254
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The century and a half from 1400 to the Dissolution of the Monasteries is one of the most interesting in the history of monastic libraries. The period also witnessed the full impact of the universities, and the dissemination of a great deal of religious literature in English. Between the middle of the fourteenth and the early sixteenth century, the number of readers among the non-clerical population of England increased dramatically. This literacy was primarily vernacular literacy. In the fifteenth century, the universities had an immense impact on the monasteries. Monks who had studied at university naturally had an effect on the libraries of their mother-houses. The fifteenth century was also a period of intellectual stagnation in most men's houses. But the period also witnessed the building of new libraries and a renewal of activity on the part of librarians. Monasteries, friaries, cathedrals and colleges were interested in the construction of new book-rooms and new facilities.
  • 11 - The early royal collections and the Royal Library to 1461
    pp 255-266
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Edward IV is usually considered to be the founder of the English royal library as it is known today. This chapter focuses on the Lancastrian period, the reigns of Henry IV, Henry V and Henry VI. The payments in 1401-2 for works at Eltham Palace, which was rebuilt for Henry IV and was one of his favourite residences, describe a new study, one of the rooms attached to the King's new chamber. The rediscovery at Eton in 1978 of a copy of Henry V's last will of 10 June 1421 and its codicils of 1422 has added valuable information about Henry's books and his intentions for them. There can be little doubt that by 1421, Henry possessed a considerable learned library. A large number of Latin books, over 140 at least, were kept in the Treasury during the minority of Henry VI, to 1440 or later.
  • 12 - The Royal Library from Edward IV to Henry VII
    pp 267-273
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Despite constantly accumulating evidence of the ownership of books and of arrangements for their storage and care during earlier reigns, King Edward IV remains clearly identifiable as the founder of the old Royal Library. The bulk of Edward's manuscripts are large-scale copies of well-known and widely distributed library texts in French of original Latin texts. Several members of Edward IV's immediate family are known to have owned books. The next major contributor to the English Royal Library was the first Tudor sovereign, Henry VII. His own acquisitions seem to have been the result of gifts. A particularly grand gift was offered during the last year of the reign by the French ambassador, Claude de Seyssel, who presented a richly illuminated copy of a translation of a work by Xenophon from a Greek manuscript in the French royal library at Blois. The King's mother Lady Margaret Beaufort, owned at least one very grand contemporary Hours from a leading Parisian workshop.
  • 13 - The Royal Library under Henry VIII
    pp 274-282
  • View abstract

    Summary

    At one time or another, Henry VIII owned more than fifty palaces, each presumably with its own collection of books. In the first decades of the sixteenth century the main collection was housed at Richmond. In 1534, William Tyldesley was designated Keeper of the King's library in the manor of Richmond and elsewhere. The most significant development in the history of the royal collection during the sixteenth century was a direct consequence of the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 1530s. When Henry VIII and his advisers started gathering together materials relating to the royal divorce, it was logical for them to turn to the monastic libraries. By the early 1530s, texts relating to the powers of the pope and medieval councils, as well as some historical items, began to trickle in. In 1549, Bartholomew Traheron, the Royal Librarian, was specifically empowered to bring books from other royal libraries to Westminster.
  • 14 - The humanist book
    pp 283-315
  • View abstract

    Summary

    The activities typical of the humanist were the editing and exposition of Latin and Greek texts, and the translation of Greek into Latin, with the aim of recovering and reviving ancient knowledge and ancient eloquence. This chapter deals with humanist books including their copying, printing and importation, and the book-sellers, book-buyers and the publication patterns of humanist books. The first Latin classic to be printed in Britain was a brief student text: Cicero, Pro Milone, which came, about 1483. Classical and humanist texts owned and used in England came in from Italy, Germany, France and the Low Countries. The chapter also talks about the British, Scottish, Italian and French humanists, Erasmus and Christian humanists including John Colet, Sir Thomas More, Thomas Linacre, and the humanist books at the Oxford and Cambridge libraries, and at the Corpus Christi College. The Duke of Gloucester, Humfrey patronized humanist books in Britain. His manuscripts later served as exemplars for copyists in England.
  • 15 - University libraries and book-sellers
    pp 316-353
  • View abstract

    Summary

    It was in the university libraries that the standard texts, the embodiment of the received curricula, accumulated and it is against this background that the provision and use of books in the universities is best viewed. Until the last quarter of the fourteenth century, college libraries grew gradually usually given or bequeathed by Fellows. The less valuable books were made available on loan to the Fellows, and sometimes the Scholars, in order of seniority, at electiones. In the latter part of the fifteenth century, access to the communal libraries was a privilege of which many were glad to avail themselves. Changes in syllabus have seldom, until modern times, provided sufficient impetus for universities to undertake large-scale revision of statutes. The major transition, including from a medieval syllabus to a humanist one, took place largely independently of any formal declaration that these things should be. The chapter also talks about the facilities available to university book-sellers.
  • 16 - Text-books in the universities: the evidence from the books
    pp 354-379
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Text-books are linked directly to the curricula of schools and universities and their history reflects the evolution of institutional teaching. In the sixteenth century, student notes were often printed without the consent of the lecturer/author. Thereby a type of material previously restricted to a fairly local area became accessible throughout Europe; this, in turn, weakened local traditions. While the teaching within individual institutions became less uniform, European universities with similar religious attitudes became more alike, as the same, or similar, text-books became available throughout the Continent. Many grammar, logic and rhetoric text-books were in use in the later Middle Ages, but many had lost their text-book function, themselves becoming the basis for extensive and advanced commentaries. Several of John Vaus's books can be related to his work on the Doctrinale. Vaus explained that he had chosen to work on the Doctrinale because that was the text his students would expect to use.
  • 17 - Text-books: a case study – logic
    pp 380-386
  • View abstract

    Summary

    In the period 1400 to 1557, we would expect great changes in the logic text-books used at Oxford and Cambridge. Indeed, there were great changes, but their timing is somewhat unexpected. This chapter focuses on the fortuna of just one type of logic text in use between 1400 and 1530, namely the treatises devoted to obligationes, or the rules prescribing what one was obliged to accept and reject in a certain kind of logical disputation. It is necessary first to consider the place of logic in the curriculum and the type of instruction which was offered, then to say something about fourteenth-century logicians and the obligationes texts used in the fifteenth century, and finally to examine the Libelli Sophistarum and other early printed texts in relation to fifteenth-century manuscript collections. The logic curriculum did not change substantially in the first decades of the sixteenth century.
  • 18 - The canon law
    pp 387-398
  • View abstract

    Summary

    This chapter describes what is known about the existence and the use of canon law books in Britain. The canon law always maintained a distinct identity. Many books dealt primarily with canonical problems or texts, and the canon law was in a real sense the dominant partner in the ius commune. Together with rules drawn from the Roman law, the canon law provided the principal source of the jurisprudence in the English ecclesiastical courts. Englishmen and Scotsmen were importers rather than producers of books relating to the canon law. The great canonists were Italian, French, German and Spanish. However, the Manipulus curatorum, written by the Spanish jurist Guido de Monte Rochen, was not simply imported. This book on duties of parochial clergy was printed in England seven times between 1498 and 1520. Of the imported texts, the comprehensive work on the Gregorian Decretals by Nicolaus de Tudeschis was particularly popular before the turn of the sixteenth century.
  • 19 - The civil law
    pp 399-410
  • View abstract

    Summary

    During the fifteenth century and the first half of the sixteenth, civil law underwent important changes which affected both the text of the collections encompassed in the Corpus iuris civilis and legal scholarship. The quasi-monopoly of Italian authorities was only very gradually eroded by scholars from transalpine universities. The reliance of non-Italian authors on the major fourteenth- and fifteenth-century authors contributed to ensure that the late medieval commentaries, collections of consilia, treatises and other works continued to circulate extensively throughout the western European market, England included. The English libraries contained on the whole substantially more canon law books than civilian literature. The chapter also talks about the availability of civil law literature in the standard civil law library, the scholarly library, the practitioner's library, and the ecclesiastical and monastic libraries. The standard civilian library, usually achieved only partly in specific collections, was the ideal for both private and institutional collections.
  • 20 - The books of the common law
    pp 411-432
  • View abstract

    Summary

    This chapter deals with several aspects of common law during the medieval period in England such as law libraries, law cases and readings, law books and practice manuals, the law book trade including press and printing, and the legal profession itself. There were no common-law libraries comparable with those of the universities or large monasteries. The Inns of Court had nascent libraries around 1500, but few books in them, not all legal. Lawyers went on reporting current cases in manuscript, and some collections reaching back into the 1530s and 1540s were printed in later times. The first requirement for any common lawyer was a knowledge of the writs and forms of action whereby justice was distributed through the royal courts. Precedents of conveyancing and pleading were made by lawyers for their own use, the former largely by lowly practitioners, the latter (in the form of Latin books of entries) by prothonotaries and clerks.
  • 21 - Medicine and science
    pp 433-448
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Linda Voigts's survey of manuscript book production in England between 1375 and 1500 demonstrates the multi-lingual character of most medical and scientific books. That is to say, Middle English and Anglo-Norman are to be found alongside the Latin of the scholastics. The fifteenth century is the first for which we have a number of commonplace books written by practitioners. One example is the Practica and surgery written by Thomas Fayreford, a medical practitioner in north Devon and Somerset in the first quarter of the century. Access to scientific books of the sort Fayreford required was probably only available at Oxford and Cambridge, where both institutional and private collections were built up with a deliberate bias towards medicine and science. Roger Marchall's commissioning, purchasing, annotating and disposing of books gives us an idea of how a fifteenth-century academic and medical practitioner might have used manuscripts. The scientific best-seller of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries was undoubtedly the almanac.
  • 22 - Schools and school-books
    pp 449-469
  • View abstract

    Summary

    Schools open to the public may also have originated in Saxon times. In the medieval period-English universities, students often needed remedial instruction in elementary Latin grammar, while advanced Latin grammar formed part of the undergraduate course. Once pupils had mastered basic Latin, they continued their studies with texts in Latin itself. The difficult task of compiling an English dictionary with Latin equivalents was accomplished by a Dominican recluse of King's Lynn, who completed the work, called Promptorium parvulorum, in 1440. In the great lay households, boys and girls of the nobility and gentry were trained for lay careers rather than ecclesiastical ones, with greater emphasis on the vernacular than on Latin. When printed books became available in England, from English presses or through importation, large possibilities existed for selling educational books to noble households, and schools in towns and religious houses. Printers other than William Caxton sought to exploit the market in school text-books.

Page 1 of 2


Bibliography
Abrams, L. and Carley, J. P. (eds.) 1991 The archaeology and history ofx Glastonbury abbey. Essays in honour of the 90th birthday of C. A. Ralegh Radford, Woodbridge.
Adamson, J. W. 1946The extent of literacy in England in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries: notes and conjectures’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 10, 1929–30 ; rpt in Adamson, , The illiterate Anglo-Saxon and other essays, Cambridge.
Aeschbach, M. (ed.) 1989 Raoul Lefèvre, le recueil des histoires de Troyes, Publications universitaires Européennes, ser. 13: Langue et littérature française 120, Berne.
Alexander, J. J. G. 1971A lost leaf from a Bodleian book of hours’, Bodleian Library Record, 8.
Alexander, J. J. G. 1972William Abell “lymnour” and English fifteenth-century illumination’, in Rosenauer, A. and Weber, G. (eds.), Kunsthistorische Forschungen Otto Pächt zu ehren, Vienna.
Alexander, J. J. G. 1980An English illuminator’s work in some fourteenth-century Italian law books at Durham’, Medieval Art and Architecture at Durham Cathedral. British Archaeological Assoc. Conference Trans. for 1977.
Alexander, J. J. G. 1983Painting and manuscript illumination for royal patrons in the later Middle Ages’, in Scattergood, and Sherborne, , 1983.
Alexander, J. J. G. 1989aCopies and variations: the relationship to the model in Medieval and Renaissance European illuminated manuscripts’, in Preciado, K. (ed.), Retaining the original: multiple originals, copies and reproductions, Washington DC.
Alexander, J. J. G. 1989bKatherine Bray’s Flemish book of hours’, Ricardian 8, 107.
Alexander, J. J. G. 1992 Medieval illuminators and their methods of work, New Haven and London.
Alexander, J. J. G. and Temple, E. 1985 Illuminated manuscripts in Oxford College libraries, the University Archives and the Taylor Institution, Oxford.
Alexander, J. J. G. and Binski, P. (eds.) 1987 Age of chivalry. Art in Plantagenet England 1200–1400, London.
Allen, P. S., Allen, H. M. and Garrod, H. W. (eds.), Opus epistolarum Des. Erasmi Roterodami, 12 vols., Oxford 1906–58, , C. G. 1954The sources of Lily’s Latin grammar’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 9.
Allen, P. S., Allen, H. M. and Garrod, H. W. (eds.), Opus epistolarum Des. Erasmi Roterodami, 12 vols., Oxford 1906–58, , P. S. 1910Bishop Shirwood of Durham and his library’, English Historical Review, 25.
Allen, P. S., Allen, H. M. and Garrod, H. W. (eds.), Opus epistolarum Des. Erasmi Roterodami, 12 vols., Oxford 1906–58, , P. S. 1924Early documents connected with the library of Merton College’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 4.
Allenson, S. 1989The Inverness fragments: music from a pre-Reformation Scottish parish church and school’, Music and Letters, 70.
Allmand, C.T. 1982The civil lawyers’, in Clough, C. H. (ed.), Profession, vocation, and culture in later medieval England: essays dedicated to the memory of A. R. Myers, Liverpool.
Alston, R. C. 1994 Books with manuscript. A short-title catalogue of books with manuscript notes in the British Library, London.
Alston, R. C. 1996 Books printed on vellum in the collections of the British Library. With a catalogue of Hebrew books printed on vellum compiled by B. S. Hill, London.
Anglo, S. 1969 Spectacle, pageantry and early Tudor policy, Oxford (2nd edn 1996).
Anstey, H. (ed.) 1898 Epistolae Academiae Oxoniensis, 2 vols., Oxford Historical Society, Oxford.
Aplin, J. 1981The origins of John Day’s “Certaine notes”’, Music and Letters, 62.
Aquilon, P. and Martin, H.-J. (eds.) 1988 Le livre dans l’Europe de la Renaissance. Actes du 28me colloque internationale d’études humanistes de Tours, Paris.
Archer, R. 1992“How ladies … who live on their manors ought to manage their households and states”: women as landholders and administrators in the later Middle Ages’, in Goldberg, P. J. P. (ed.), Woman is a worthy wight: women in English society, c.1200–1500, Gloucester.
Armstrong, C. A. J. 1973The piety of Cicely, Duchess of York’ (1942)
Armstrong, E. 1979English purchases of printed books from the Continent 1465–1526’, English Historical Review, 94.
Armstrong, E. 1990Origins and development of book-privileges in Europe’, in Armstrong, E., Before copyright. The French book-privilege system 1498–1526, Cambridge.
Arnould, A. 1993 Contribution to Splendours of Flanders: late medieval art in Cambridge collections, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
Ascham, R. 1864–5 The whole works of Roger Ascham … collected and revised by J. A. Giles, London.
Ascham, R. 1904 English works, ed. Wright, W. A., Cambridge (rpt 1970).
Ashbee, A. (ed.) 1993 Records of English court music. Vol. VII: 1485–1558, Aldershot.
Ashworth, E. J. 1978A note on Paul of Venice and the Oxford logica of 1483’, Medioevo, 4.
Ashworth, E. J. 1979aThe “Libelli sophistarum” and the use of medieval logic texts at Oxford and Cambridge in the early sixteenth century’, Vivarium, 17.
Ashworth, E. J. 1979bA note on an early printed logic text in Edinburgh University Library’, Innes Rev., 30.
Ashworth, E. J. 1985aEnglish Obligationes texts after Roger Swyneshed: the tracts beginning “Obligatio est quaedam ars”’, in Lewry, P. P. (ed.), The rise of British logic, Toronto.
Ashworth, E. J. 1985b Introduction to Sanderson, R., Logicae artis compendium, ed. Ashworth, Bologna.
Ashworth, E. J. 1991Logic in late sixteenth-century England: humanist dialectic and the new Aristotelianism’, Studies in Philology, 88.
Ashworth, E. J. 1992The Obligationes of John Tarteys: edition and introduction’, Documenti e studi sulla tradizione filosofica medievale 3.
Ashworth, E. J. and Spade, P. V. 1992Logic in late medieval Oxford’, in HUO, II.
Aston, M. 1984 Lollards and reformers: images and literacy in late medieval religion, London.
Auerbach, E. 1954 Tudor artists: a study of painters in the royal service and of portraiture on illuminated documents from the accession of Henry VII to the death of Elizabeth I, London.
Aungier, G. J. 1840 The history and antiquities of Syon Monastery, London.
Avis, F. C. 1973England’s use of Antwerp printers 1500–1540’, Gutenberg-Jahrbuch 1973.
Avril, F. and Reynaud, N. 1993 Les manuscrits à peintures en France 1440–1520, catalogue of the exhibition in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris.
Axton, R. (ed.) 1979 Three Rastell plays, Cambridge.
Backhouse, J. M. 1973Bourdichon’s “Hours of Henry VII”’, British Museum Quarterly, 37.
Backhouse, J. M. 1985 Books of hours, London.
Backhouse, J. M. 1987Founders of the Royal Library: Edward IV and Henry VII as collectors of illuminated manuscripts’, in Williams, D. (ed.), England in the fifteenth century: proceedings of the Harlaxton Symposium for 1986, Woodbridge.
Backhouse, J. M. 1989Illuminated manuscripts and the early development of the portrait miniature’, in Williams, D. (ed.), Early Tudor England: proceedings of the 1987 Harlaxton Symposium, Woodbridge, pls..
Backhouse, J. M. 1993 The Isabella breviary, London.
Backhouse, J. M. 1994Sir John Donne’s Flemish manuscripts’, in Monks, and Owen, 1994.
Backhouse, J. M. 1995Illuminated manuscripts associated with Henry VII and members of his immediate family’, in Thompson, B. (ed.), The reign of Henry VII: proceedings of the 1993 Harlaxton Symposium, Harlaxton Medieval Studies 5, Woodbridge and Stamford CT, pls..
Backhouse, J. M. 1996 The Hastings Hours, London.
Baker, J. H. 1986 The Notebook of Sir John Port, Selden Society 102, London.
Baker, J. H. 1988 Introduction to St German, C., Doctor and student (rpt of 1787 edn), Birmingham AL.
Baker, J. H. 1989aJohn Bryt’s reports (1410–1411) and the year books of Henry IV’, Cambridge Law Jnl, 48.
Baker, J. H. 1989bRecords, reports and the origins of case-law in England’, in Baker, J. H. (ed.), Judicial records, law reports and the growth of case law, Berlin.
Baker, J. H. 1990a The third university of England: the Inns of Court and the common-law tradition, Selden Society, London.
Baker, J. H. 1990b Manual of law French, 2nd edn, Aldershot.
Baker, J. H. 1990c intro. to Readings and moots at the Inns of Court, II, Selden Society 105, London.
Baker, J. H. 1994 Reports from the lost notebooks of Sir James Dyer, Selden Society 109–10, London.
Baker, J. H. (ed.) 1977–8 The reports of Sir John Spelman, Selden Society 93–4, London.
Baker-Smith, D. 1984Florens Wilson and his circle: emigrés in Lyons, 1539–1543’, in Castor, G. and Cave, T. C. (eds.), Neo-Latin and the vernacular in Renaissance France, Oxford.
Bale, J. 1990 The Vocacyon of Johan Bale to the bishoprick of Ossorie in Irelande, ed. Happé, P. and King, J. N., Renaissance English Text Society, 7th ser. 14, Binghamton NY.
Balogh, J. 1975 Die Anfänge der Renaissance in Ungarn. Matthias Corvinus und die Kunst, Graz.
Banks, C., Searle, A. and Turner, M. (eds.) 1993 Sundry sorts of music books: essays on the British Library collections presented to O. W. Neighbour on his 70th birthday, London.
Bannister, A. J. (ed.) 1921 Registrum Caroli Bothe episcopi Herefordensis A. D. 1516–1535, Canterbury and York Society, 28, London.
Barber, G. 1977Thomas Linacre: a bibliographical survey of his works’, in Maddison, F., Pelling, M. and Webster, C. (eds.), Linacre studies: essays on the life and work of Thomas Linacre c. 1460–1524, Oxford.
Barclay, A. 1874 The Ship of fools, ed. Jamieson, T. H., 2 vols., Edinburgh and London.
[Barclay, A.] 1985 The gardyners passetaunce touchying the outrage of Fraunce, ed. Williams, F. B. Jr and Nixon, H. M., Roxburghe Club, London.
Barker, N. J. 1972A register of writs and the Scales binder’, Book Collector, 21.
Barker, N. J. 1976Caxton’s typography’, Jnl of the Printing Historical Soc. 11 (Papers presented to the Caxton International Congress 1976), and plates.
Barker, N. J. 1978 The Oxford University Press and the spread of learning, an illustrated history, 1478–1978, Oxford.
Barker, N. J. 1979The St Albans press: the first punch-cutter in England and the first native typefounder?Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 8.
Barker, N. J. 1985The importation of books into England 1460–1526’, in Göpfert, H. G. et al. (eds.), Beiträge zur Geschichte des Buchwesens im konfessionellen Zeitalter, Wolfenbütteler Schriften zur Geschichte des Buchwesens, Wiesbaden.
Barker, N. J. (ed.) 1993 A potencie of life: books in society, Clark Lectures 1986–7, Cambridge.
Baron, H. 1989The “Blage” manuscript: the original compiler identified’, English Manuscript Studies, 1.
Barratt, A. (ed.) 1993 Women’s writing in Middle English, Harlow.
Barratt, A. 1995 The seven Psalms. A commentary on the penitential Psalms translated from French into English by Dame Eleanor Hull, Early English Text Society Original Series 307.
Barry, John C. (ed.) 1967 William Hay’s lectures on marriage, Stair Society 24, Edinburgh.
Bartlett, K. 1977The decline and abolition of the master of grammar: an early victory of humanism at the university of Cambridge’, History of Education, 6.
Barton, J. L. 1971Roman law in England’, in Ius romanum Medii AEvi, pars V, Milan.
Barton, J. L. 1984The study of civil law before 1380’, in HUO, I.
Barton, J. L. 1986The faculty of law’, in HUO, III.
Barton, J. L. 1992The legal faculties of late medieval Oxford’, in HUO, II.
Baskerville, E. J. 1979 A chronological bibliography of propaganda and polemic published in English between 1553 and 1558 from the death of Edward VI to the death of Mary I, Memoirs of the American Philosophical Soc. 136, Philadelphia PA.
Bataillon, L. J. et al. 1988 (eds.), La production du livre universitaire au moyen âge: exemplar et pecia. Actes du symposium tenu au Collegio San Bonaventura de Grottaferrata en mai 1983, Paris.
Bateson, M. 1898 Catalogue of the library of Syon Monastery, Isleworth, Cambridge.
Baumer, Franklin Le Van 1940 The early Tudor theory of kingship, New Haven (rpt 1961).
Bäuml, F. H. 1980Varieties and consequences of medieval literacy and illiteracy’, Speculum, 55.
Baurmeister, U. and Laffitte, M.- P. 1992 Des livres et des rois: la bibliothèque royale de Blois, Paris.
Bawcutt, P. 1991 ‘The earliest texts of Dunbar’, in Riddy, 1991.
Bazire, J. and Colledge, E. (eds.) 1957 The Chastising of God’s children and the Treatise of perfection of the sons of God, Oxford.
Beadle, H. R. L. (ed.) 1994 The Cambridge companion to medieval theatre, Cambridge.
Beadle, H. R. L. and Meredith, P. (eds.) 1983 The York play, Leeds Texts and Monographs. Medieval Drama Facsimiles, Leeds.
Beadle, H. R. L. and Owen, A. E. B. (eds.) 1977 The Findern anthology, London.
Beadle, H. R. L. and Piper, A. J. (eds.) 1995 New science out of old books. Studies in manuscripts and early printed books in honour of A. I. Doyle, Aldershot.
Beal, P. G. 1980 Index of English literary manuscripts. Vol. I: 1450–1625, London and New York.
Beale, J. H. 1926 A bibliography of early English law books, Cambridge MA.
Beattie, W. (ed.) 1950 The Chepman and Millar prints: a facsimile, Edinburgh.
Bedouelle, G. and Le Gal, P. 1987 Le ‘Divorce’ du roi Henry VIII: études et documents, Geneva.
Bell, D. N. 1984The books of Meaux Abbey’, Analecta Cisterciensia, 40.
Bell, D. N. 1989aA Cistercian at Oxford: Richard Dove of Buckfast and London, British Library, London, Sloane 513’, Studia Monastica, 31.
Bell, D. N. 1989bThe English Cistercians and the practice of medicine’, Cîteaux, 40.
Bell, D. N. 1992 An index of authors and works in Cistercian libraries in Great Britain, Kalamazoo MI.
Bell, D. N. 1995 What nuns read: books and libraries in medieval English nunneries, Cistercian Studies Series 158, Kalamazoo MI.
Bell, H. E. 1937The price of books in medieval England’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 17.
Bell, M. and Barnard, J. 1992Provisional count of A short-title catalogue of books printed in England, Scotland and Ireland, and of English books printed abroad, 1475–1640, first compiled by A. W. Pollard and G. R. Redgrave, Second Edition, revised and enlarged, begun by W. A. Jackson and F. S. Ferguson, completed by Katharine F. Pantzer, with a chronological index by Philip R. Rider, 3 vols., London 1976–91 titles 1475–1640’, Publishing History, 31.
Bennett, H. S. 1946–7The production and dissemination of vernacular manuscripts in the fifteenth century’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 1.
Bennett, H. S. 1950Notes on English retail book-prices, 1480–1560’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 5.
Bennett, H. S. 1952 English books and readers 1475 to 1557, Cambridge (rpt 1969).
Bennett, H. S. 1965 English books and readers 1558–1603, Cambridge.
Bent, M. 1968New and little-known fragments of English medieval polyphony’, Jnl of the American Musicological Soc., 21.
Bent, M. 1984The progeny of Old Hall: more leaves from a royal English choirbook’, in Dittmer, L. (ed.), Gordon Athol Anderson (1929–1981): in memoriam, 2 vols., Wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen 39, Henryville, Ottawa and Binningen.
Bent, M. 1996A new canonic gloria and the changing profile of Dunstaple’, Plainsong and Medieval Music, 5.
Bergen, H. (ed.) 1924–7 Lydgate’s Fall of princes, 4 vols., Early English Text Society Extra Series, London.
Berty, A. 1885 Topographie historique du vieux Paris, Vol. I: Région du Louvre et des Tuileries, Paris.
Berty, A. Bibliotheca Erasmiana Bruxellensis, 1993, Brussels.
Berty, A. La Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, cenni storici, 1981, Florence.
Bietenholz, Peter G. 1971 Basle and France in the sixteenth century, Toronto.
Bietenholz, Peter. G. (ed.) 1985–7 Contemporaries of Erasmus: a biographical register of the Renaissance and Reformation, 3 vols., Toronto.
Biller, P. and Hudson, A. (eds.) 1994 Heresy and literacy, 1000–1530, Cambridge.
Birley, R. 1956The history of Eton College library’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 11.
Birrell, T. A. 1987a English monarchs and their books from Henry VII to Charles II, Panizzi Lectures 1986, London.
Birrell, T. A. 1987bThe printed books of Dame Margaret Nicollson: a pre-Reformation collection’, in Bakker, J., Verleun, J. A. and Vriesenaerde, J. (eds.), Essays on English and American literature … offered to D. Wilkinson, Costerus, n.s. 63, Amsterdam.
Blades, W. 1861–63 The life and typography of William Caxton, England’s first printer, with evidence of his typographical connection with Colard Mansion, 2 vols., London.
Blagden, C. 1960 The Stationers’ Company: a history, 1403–1959, London.
Blake, N. F. 1968 Caxton and his world, London.
Blake, N. F. 1970Wynkyn de Worde and “The Quatrefoil of Love”’, Archiv, 206.
Blake, N. F. 1971Lord Berners, a survey’, Mediaevalia et humanistica, n.s. 2.
Blake, N. F. 1973 Caxton’s own prose, London.
Blake, N. F. 1985 William Caxton: a bibliographical guide, New York.
Blake, N. F. 1989Manuscript to print’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989.
Blake, N. F. 1996 William Caxton (Authors of the Middle Ages, vol. 3, nos. : ‘English Writers of the late Middle Ages’, gen. ed. Seymour, M. C.), Gateshead.
Blake, N. F. (ed.) 1992 The Cambridge history of the English language. Vol. II: 1066–1476, Cambridge.
Blanchfield, L. S. 1991The romances in MS Ashmole 61: an idiosyncratic scribe’, in Mills, M., Fellows, J. and Meale, C. M. (eds.), Romance in medieval England, Cambridge.
Blayney, M. S. (ed.) 1974–80 English translations of Alain Chartier’s ‘Le traité de l’esperence’ and ‘Le quadrilogue invectif’, Early English Text Society Original Series 270, 281, Oxford.
Blodgett, J. E. 1979Some printer’s copy for William Thynne’s 1532 edition of Chaucer’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 1.
Blomefield, F. 1805–10 An essay towards a topographical history of the county of Norfolk, 11 vols., London.
Bloy, C. H. 1967 A history of printing ink, ball and rollers, 1440–1850, London.
Blunt, J. H. (ed.) 1873 The Myroure of oure Ladye, Early English Text Society Extra Series 19, London (rpt 1983).
Boase, C. W. (ed.) 1885 Register of the University of Oxford. Vol. I: 1449–63, 1505–71, Oxford Historical Society 1, Oxford.
Bödeker, H. E. (ed.) 1995 Histoires du livre, nouvelles orientations. Actes du colloque du 6 et 7 septembre 1990 à Göttingen, Collection ‘In Octavo’, Paris.
Boersma, F. L. 1981 An introduction to Fitzherbert’s Abridgement, Abingdon.
Boffey, J. 1991Early printers and English lyrics: sources, selection, and presentation of texts’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 85.
Boffey, J. 1994English dream poems of the fifteenth century and their French connections’, in Maddox, D. and Sturm-Maddox, S. (eds.), Literary aspects of courtly culture: selected papers from the seventh triennial congress of the International Courtly Lit. Soc., Cambridge.
Boffey, J. 1995Lydgate’s lyrics and women readers’, in Smith, L. J. and Taylor, J. H. M. (eds.), Woman, the book and the worldly: selected proceedings of the St Hilda’s Conference, Cambridge.
Boffey, J. 1996Some London women readers and a text of The three kings of Cologne’, Ricardian, 10, no. 132.
Boffey, J. and Thompson, J. J. 1989Anthologies and miscellanies: selection and presentation of texts’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989.
Boffey, J. and Edwards, A. S. G. (eds.) 1997 Bodleian Library ms. Arch. Selden B. 24: The works of Chaucer and the ‘Kingis Quair’, with appendix by B. C. Barker-Benfield, Cambridge.
Bohatta, H. 1924 Bibliographie der livres d’heures des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts, 2nd edn, Vienna.
Bonaventure, Brother 1961The teaching of Latin in later medieval England’, Medieval Stud., 23.
Bond, E. A. (ed.) 1853 Statutes of the colleges of Oxford, with royal patents of foundation … 3 vols., Oxford.
Bond, W. H. 1948Casting off copy by Elizabethan printers: a theory’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 42.
Bone, G. 1932Extant manuscripts of books printed from by Wynkyn de Worde, with notes on the owner, Roger Thorney’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 12.
Bornstein, D. (ed.) 1978 Distaves and dames: Renaissance treatises for and about women, New York.
Bosanquet, E. F. 1917 English printed almanacks and prognostications. A bibliographical history to the year 1600, Bibliographical Soc. Illustrated Monographs 17, London.
Bourdillon, A. F. C. 1926 The order of Minoresses in England, Manchester.
Bowers, J. M. 1989Hoccleve’s Huntington holographs: the first “collected poems” in English’, Fifteenth-Century Stud., 15.
Bowers, R. 1981Obligation, agency, and laissez-faire: the promotion of polyphonic composition for the church in fifteenth-century England’, in Fenlon, I. (ed.), Music in medieval and early modern Europe: patronage, sources and texts, Cambridge.
Bowers, R. 1991The cultivation and promotion of music in the household and orbit of Thomas Wolsey’, in Gunn, S. J. and Lindley, P. G. (eds.), Cardinal Wolsey. Church, state and art, Cambridge.
Bowers, R. and Wathey, A. (comps.) 1983New sources of English fourteenth- and fifteenth-century polyphony’, Early Music History, 3.
Bowker, M. 1968 The secular clergy in the diocese of Lincoln, Cambridge.
Boyle, L. E. 1955The Oculus sacerdotis and some other works of William of Pagula’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th ser., 5.
Boyle, L. E. 1965The Summa summarum and some other English works of canon law’, in Kuttner, S. and Ryan, J. J. (eds.), Proceedings of the second international congress of medieval canon law, Vatican City.
Boyle, L. E. 1985The fourth Lateran Council and manuals of popular theology’, in Heffernan, T. J. (ed.), The popular literature of medieval England, Knoxville TN.
Bradshaw, H. 1860Two lists of books in the University Library’, Communications made to the Cambridge Antiquarian Soc., Oct. ser., 10, 2 (rpt Bradshaw 1889).
Bradshaw, H. 1887 A half-century of notes on the Day Book of John Dorne, Cambridge (rpt Bradshaw 1889).
Bradshaw, H. 1889 Collected papers, Cambridge.
Braekman, W. L. 1985Bollard’s Middle English Book of planting and grafting and its background’, Studia neophilologica, 57.
Braekman, W. L. (ed.) 1989 Geoffrey of Franconia’s Book of trees and wine, Scripta 24, Brussels.
Bray, R. 1995Music and the quadrivium in early Tudor England’, Music and Letters, 76.
Breeze, A. and Glomski, J. 1991An early British treatise upon education: Leonard Cox’s De erudienda iuventute (1526)’, Humanistica Lovaniensia, 40.
Brévart, F. B. 1988The German Volkskalender of the fifteenth century’, Speculum, 63.
Brewer, D. S. and Owen, A. E. B. (eds. and intro.) 1978 The Thornton manuscript: Lincoln Cathedral Library MS 91, 2nd edn, London.
Brigden, S. 1989 London and the Reformation, Oxford.
Brodie, A. R. 1974Anwykyll’s Vulgaria’, Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, 75.
Brodin, G. (ed.) 1950 Agnus castus: a Middle English herbal reconstructed from various manuscripts, Uppsala.
Brooke, C. N. L. 1985 A history of Gonville and Caius College, Woodbridge and Dover NH.
Brown, A. J. 1984The date of Erasmus’ Latin translation of the New Testament’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 8, 4.
Brown, R. A. and Colvin, H. M. 1963The king’s houses 1066–1485’, in Brown, R. A., Colvin, H. M. and Taylor, A. J., The history of the King’s works: the Middle Ages, 2 vols., London.
Browne, M. P. (ed.) 1826 Decisions of the Court of Session … 1766–1791, collected by Sir David Dalrymple of Hailes … sel. by M. P. Browne, 2 vols., Edinburgh.
Brownrigg, L. L. (ed.) 1990 Medieval book production: assessing the evidence, Los Altos Hills CA.
Brusendorff, A. 1925 The Chaucer tradition, London.
Buettner, B. 1988Jacques Raponde “marchand de manuscrits enluminés”’, Langue, texte, histoire médiévales (La culture sur le marché), 14.
Bühler, C. F. 1940Caxton studies’, Gutenberg-Jahrbuch (rpt Bühler 1973).
Bühler, C. F. 1950–1Observations on two Caxton variants’, Studies in Bibliography, 3 (rpt Bühler 1973).
Bühler, C. F. 1953The first edition of the Abbey of the Holy Ghost’, Studies in Bibliography, 5 (rpt Bühler 1973).
Bühler, C. F. 1960 The fifteenth-century book: the scribes, the printers, the decorators, Philadelphia.
Bühler, C. F. 1964Prayers and charms in certain Middle English scrolls’, Speculum, 39, (rpt Bühler 1973).
Bühler, C. F. 1973 Early books and manuscripts: forty years of research, New York.
Bühler, C. F. (ed.) 1941 The Dicts and sayings of the philosophers. The translations made by Stephen Scrope, William Worcester and an anonymous translator, Early English Text Society Original Series 211, London.
Bush, M. L. 1975 The government policy of Protector Somerset, London.
Butterworth, C. C. 1953 The English primers, 1529–1545, their publication and connection with the English Bible and the Reformation in England, Philadelphia.
Byrom, H. J. 1927Richard Tottell: his life and work’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 8.
Caldwell, D. F. C. (ed.) 1954–67 Virgil’s ‘Aeneid’ translated into Scottish verse by Gavin Douglas, 4 vols., Scottish Text Society, 3rd ser., 25, 27, 28, 30, Edinburgh.
Caldwell, J. 1991 The Oxford history of English music. Vol. I: From the beginnings to c. 1715, Oxford.
Caldwell, J. 1995 Tudor keyboard music c. 1520–1580, Musica Britannica 66, London.
Calkins, R. G. 1983 Illuminated books of the Middle Ages, London.
Campbell, M. F. A. G., Annales de la typographie néerlandaise au XVme s., and Suppléments, The Hague 1874–90, , L. and Foister, S. 1986Gerard, Lucas and Susanna Horenbout’, Burlington Mag., 128.
Campbell, M. F. A. G., Annales de la typographie néerlandaise au XVme s., and Suppléments, The Hague 1874–90, , P. G. C. 1925Christine de Pisan en Angleterre’, Rev. de littérature comparée, 5.
Capp, B. 1979 Astrology and the popular press: English almanacs 1500–1800, London.
Cargill-Thompson, W. D. J. 1954Notes on King’s College library, 1500–1570’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 2, 1.
Carley, J. P. 1986John Leland and the contents of English pre-Dissolution libraries: the Cambridge friars’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society 9, 1.
Carley, J. P. 1989aJohn Leland and the foundation of the royal library: the Westminster inventory of 1542’, Bull. of the Soc. for Renaissance Stud., 7.
Carley, J. P. 1989bJohn Leland and the contents of English pre-Dissolution libraries: Lincolnshire’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 9, 3.
Carley, J. P. 1997aSir Thomas Bodley’s library and its acquisitions: an edition of the Nottingham benefactions of 1604’, in Carley, J. P. and Tite, C. C. G. (eds.), Books and collectors 1200–1700. Essays presented to Andrew G. Watson, London.
Carley, J. P. 1997bMarks in books and the libraries of Henry VIII’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 91.
Carley, J. P. 1998“Her moost lovyng and fryndely brother sendeth gretyng”: Anne Boleyn’s manuscripts and their sources’, in Brown, M. P. and McKendrick, S. (eds.), Illuminating the book: makers and interpreters. Essays in honour of Janet Backhouse, London and Toronto.
Carlin, M. 1987Historical gazetteer of London before the Great Fire: St Botolph, Aldgate’, University of London, Institute of Historical Research, Social and Economic Study of Medieval London, typescript in IHR.
Carlson, D. R. 1993 English humanist books: writers and patrons, manuscript and print, 1475–1525, Toronto, Buffalo, London.
Carlson, D. R. 1997Woodcut illustrations of the Canterbury Tales, 1483–1602’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 19.
Carpenter, C. 1992 Locality and polity: a study of Warwickshire landed society, 1401–1499, Cambridge.
Carpenter, K. E. (ed.) 1983 Books and society in history: papers of the Association of College and Research Libraries, Rare Books and Manuscripts Preconference … 1980, New York.
Carroll, C. 1996Humanism and English literature in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries’, in Kraye, J. (ed.), The Cambridge companion to Renaissance humanism, Cambridge.
Carter, H. 1969 A view of early typography up to about 1600, Oxford.
Catto, J. I. 1985Religious change under Henry V’, in Harriss, G. L. (ed.), Henry V: the practice of kingship, Oxford.
Catto, J. I. 1992Scholars and studies in Renaissance Oxford’, in HUO, II.
Challis, C. E. 1978 The Tudor coinage, Manchester.
Chambers, R. W. and Seton, W. W. (eds.) 1914 A fifteenth-century courtesy book (ed. Chambers) and Two fifteenth-century Franciscan rules (ed. Seton, ) Early English Text Society Original Series 148, London.
Charles, B. G. and Emanuel, H. D. 1949–50Notes on old libraries and books’, Cylchgrawn Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru, 6.
Chartier, R. (ed.) 1989 The culture of print: power and the uses of print in early modern Europe, Princeton NJ and London.
,Chatsworth House 1991 Treasures of Chatsworth. A private view, London.
Chaucer, G. 1940 The Text of the Canterbury Tales, ed. Manly, J. M. and Rickert, E., 8 vols., Chicago.
Chaytor, H. J. 1945 From script to print: an introduction to medieval literature, Cambridge.
Cheney, C. R. 1961William Lyndwood’s Provinciale’, Jurist, 21 (rpt Cheney, , Medieval texts and studies, Oxford, 1973).
Cheney, C. R. 1973The records of medieval England’ (Cambridge University inaugural lecture 1955), in Cheney, , Medieval texts and studies, Oxford.
Cheney, C. R. 1987A register of manuscripts borrowed from a college library, 1440–1517: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, MS 232’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 9, 2.
Cheney, C. R. 1988A register of electiones of manuscripts of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, 1440–1517’, in Kramer, S. and Bernhard, M. (eds.), Scire litteras: Forschungen zum mittelalterlichen Geistesleben, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Phil.- Hist. Klasse, Abh., N. F. 99.
Cherry, T. A. F. 1963The library of Henry Sinclair, Bishop of Ross, 1560–1565’, Bibliotheck, 4, 1.
Chobham, T. 1968 Thomae de Chobham Summa confessorum, ed. Broomfield, F., Louvain and Paris.
Chomarat, J. 1981 Grammaire et rhétorique chez Erasme, 2 vols., Paris.
Chrisman, M. Usher 1982 Lay culture, learned culture: books and social change in Strasbourg, 1480–1559, New Haven CT.
Christ, K., Kern, A. and Otto, T. M. 1984 The handbook of medieval library history, Metuchen NY.
Christianson, C. Paul 1985Early London bookbinders and parchmeners’, Book Collector.
Christianson, C. Paul 1987aAn early Tudor stationer and the “prynters of bokes”’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 9.
Christianson, C. Paul 1987b Memorials of the book trade in medieval London: the archives of Old London Bridge, Woodbridge.
Christianson, C. Paul 1989aA community of book artisans in Chaucer’s London’, Viator, 20.
Christianson, C. Paul 1989bChancery standard and the records of Old London Bridge’, in Trahern, J. B. Jr (ed.), Standardizing English: essays in the history of language change, Knoxville TN.
Christianson, C. Paul 1989cEvidence for the study of London’s late medieval manuscript-book trade’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989.
Christianson, C. Paul 1989dPaternoster Row and the Tudor book-trade community’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 11.
Christianson, C. Paul 1990 A directory of London stationers and book artisans 1300–1500, New York.
Christianson, C. Paul 1993The stationers of Paternoster Row, 1534–1557’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 87.
,Church of England, Central Council for the Care of Churches, 1959 The parochial libraries of the church of England, London.
Clanchy, M. T. 1993 From memory to written record: England 1066–1307, 2nd edn, Oxford.
Clapperton, R. H. 1934 Paper: an historical account of its making by hand, Oxford.
Clark, J. W. 1975 The care of books (1902), Cambridge.
Clough, C. H. 1977Thomas Linacre, Cornelio Vitelli, and humanistic studies at Oxford’, in Maddison, F., Pelling, M. and Webster, C. (eds.), Linacre studies. Essays on the life and work of Thomas Linacre, c.1460–1524, Oxford.
Coates, A. 1991The old library at Trinity College, Oxford’, Bodleian Library Record, 13.
Cobb, Henry S. 1959Local port customs accounts prior to 1550’, Jnl of the Soc. of Archivists, 1.
Cobb, Henry S. 1971Books of rates and the London customs, 1507–1558’, Guildhall Misc., 4, 1.
Cobb, Henry S. 1990 The overseas trade of London: Exchequer customs accounts 1480–1, London Record Soc. Pubs. 27, London.
Cobban, A. B. 1969 The King’s Hall within the university of Cambridge in the later Middle Ages, Studies in medieval life and thought, 3rd ser., 1, Cambridge.
Cobban, A. B. 1988 The medieval English universities: Oxford and Cambridge to c. 1500, Aldershot.
Cobban, A. B. 1991Pembroke College: its educational significance in late medieval Cambridge’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 10, 1.
Coing, H. (ed.) 1973–7 Handbuch der Quellen und Literatur der neueren europäischen Privatrechtsgeschichte. Vol. I: Mittelalter 1100–1500.
Coing, H. 1975Das Schrifttum der englischen Civilians und die kontinentale Rechtsliteratur in der Zeit zwischen 1550 und 1800’, Ius commune, 5.
Coleman, D. C. 1958 The British paper industry 1495–1860, Oxford.
Colledge, E. 1978South Netherlandish books of hours made for England’, Scriptorium, 32.
Collins, A. J. 1955 Jewels and plate of Queen Elizabeth I: the inventory of 1574, London.
Collinson, P. 1996William Tyndale and the course of the English Reformation’, Reformation, 1.
Collinson, P., McKitterick, D. and Leedham-Green, E. 1991 Andrew Perne. Quatercentenary studies, Cambridge Bibliographical Society Monographs 11, Cambridge.
Condon, M. M. 1986An anachronism with intent? Henry VII’s Council Ordinance of 1491/2’, in Gri√ths, R. A. and Sherborne, J. (eds.), Kings and nobles in the later Middle Ages: a tribute to Charles Ross, Gloucester, New York.
Conway, W. M. 1884 The woodcutters of the Netherlands in the fifteenth century, Cambridge.
Copland, R. 1993 Poems, ed. Erler, M. C., Toronto.
Coppens, C. 1992Sixteenth-century octavo publishers’ catalogues, mainly from the Omont collection’, De Gulden Passer, 70.
Coppens, C. 1993 Reading in exile: the libraries of John Ramridge (d. 1568), Thomas Harding (d. 1572) and Henry Joliffe (d. 1573), recusants in Louvain, Cambridge.
Coquillette, D. R. 1988 The civilian writers of Doctors’ Com mons, London. Three centuries of juristic innovation in comparative, commercial and international law, Berlin.
Corrie, G. E. 1840A late fifteenth-century St Catharine’s booklist’, Cambridge Antiquarian Soc. Quarto Pub., 1.
Corrie, G. E. 1860aA catalogue of the books given to Trinity Hall, by the founder’, Communications made to the Cambridge Antiquarian Soc., Oct. ser., 10, 2.
Corrie, G. E. 1860bA list of books presented to Pembroke College, Cambridge, by different donors, during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries’, Cambridge Antiquarian Soc. Report, 10.
Corsten, S. 1999Johann Veldener in Köln: Geschichte eines Problems’, E codicibus impressisque: Opstellen voor Elly Cockx-Indestege, Louvain.
Corsten, S. and Fuchs, R. W. (eds.) 1988–93 Der Buchdruck im 15. Jahrhundert: eine Bibliographie, 2 vols., Stuttgart.
Courtenay, W. J. 1987 Schools and scholars in fourteenth-century England, Princeton NJ.
Cowley, J. D. 1932 A bibliography of abridgments, digests, dictionaries, and indexes of English law to the year 1800, London.
Craigie, W. A. (ed.) 1919–27 The Maitland folio manuscript, 2 vols., Scottish Text Society 7, 20, Edinburgh.
Craigie, W. A. 1923–5 The Asloan manuscript, 2 vols., Scottish Text Society, 2nd ser., 14, 16, Edinburgh.
Crane, W. G. 1936Lord Berners’ translation of Diego de San Pedro’s Carcel de amor’, Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, 49.
Craster, E. 1914–16Index to Duke Humphrey’s gifts to the Old Library’, Bodleian Quarterly Review, 1.
Craster, E. 1971 The history of All Souls College library, ed. Jacob, E. F., London.
Crawley, C. 1992 Trinity Hall, the history of a Cambridge college 1350–1992, Cambridge.
Cressy, D. 1977Levels of illiteracy in England, 1530–1730’, Historical Jnl, 20.
Cressy, D. 1980 Literacy and the social order. Readers and writers in Tudor and Stuart England, Cambridge.
Croft, P. J. 1958aA copy of Walter Hylton’s Scala perfectionis’, catalogue, sale, Quaritch, B., London.
Croft, P. J. 1958b Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond, Elizabeth of York and Wynkyn de Worde, London.
Croft, P. J. 1973 Autograph poetry in the English language, 2 vols., London and New York.
Cross, M. C. 1989A medieval Yorkshire library’, Northern History, 25.
Crotch, W. J. B. (ed.) 1928 The prologues and epilogues of William Caxton, Early English Text Society Original Series 176, London.
Culley, W. T. and Furnivall, F. J. (eds.) 1890 Caxton’s Eneydos, 1490, Early English Text Society Extra Series 67, London.
Curtis, G. and Wathey, A. 1994Fifteenth-century English liturgical music: a list of the surviving repertory’, Royal M usical Assoc. Research Chron., 27.
Curtis, M. H. 1958Library catalogues at Tudor Oxford and Cambridge’, Studies in the Renaissance, 5.
Woodruff, D. (ed.), For Hilaire Belloc: essays in honour of his 72nd birthday; rpt in Armstrong, C. A. J., England, France and Burgundy in the fifteenth century, 1973.
Daiches, D. and Thorlby, A. K. (eds.) 1973 Literature and western civilisation: the material world, London.
Dale, A. W. W. 1911 Warren’s books, Cambridge.
Daniell, D. 1994 William Tyndale, a biography, London and New Haven.
Darlington, I. (ed.) 1967 London Consistory Courtwills 1492–1574, London Record Soc. 3, London.
Darnton, R. 1980What is the history of books’, in Carpenter, K. E. 1983.
Darnton, R. 1986First steps towards a history of reading’, Australian Journal of French Studies, 23 (rpt Darnton, , The kiss of Lamourette: reflections in cultural history, New York 1989).
Davenport, C. 1896 Royal English bookbindings, London.
Davenport, C. 1899 English embroidered bookbindings, London.
Davenport, C. 1901 Thomas Berthelet, royal printer and bookbinder to Henry VIII, Chicago.
Davies, R. T. (ed.) 1963 Medieval English lyrics, London.
Davis, H. W. C. 1914The canon law in England’, Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte, 34.
Davis, N. (ed.) 1971–6 The Paston letters, 2 vols., Oxford.
Davis, N. 1979 Non-Cycle plays and the Winchester dialogues, Leeds Texts and Monographs, Medieval Drama Facsimiles, Leeds.
Davison, P. (ed.), 1992 The book encompassed: studies in twentieth-century bibliography, Cambridge.
De Hamel, C. F. R. 1983Reflexions on the trade in books of hours at Ghent and Bruges’, in Trapp, 1983.
De Hamel, C. F. R. 1986 A history of illuminated manuscripts, Oxford; 2nd edn 1990.
De Hamel, C. F. R. 1991 Syon Abbey: the library of the Bridgettine nuns and their peregrinations after the Reformation, Roxburghe Club, London.
[De Hamel, C. F. R.] 1988 The Astor Collection of illuminated manuscripts, Sotheby’s book auction, 21 June, London.
De Kesel, L. 1992Cambridge University Library ms. Add. 4100: a book of hours illuminated by the Master of the Prayer book of circa 1500?Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 10, 33.
De la Mare, A. C. 1971 Catalogue of the collection of medieval manuscripts bequeathed to the Bodleian Library, Oxford, by James P. R. Lyell, Oxford. 1973 The handwriting of Italian humanists, vol. I, fasc. 1, Oxford.
De la Mare, A. C. 1977Humanistic script: the first ten years’, in Krafft, F. and Wuttke, D. (eds.), Das Verhältnis der Humanisten zum Buch, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft: Kommission für Humanismusforschung, Mitteilung 4, Bonn and Bad Godesberg.
De la Mare, A. C. 1980Humanistic hands in England’, in Mare, and Barker-Benfield, 1980.
De la Mare, A. C. 1985aDuke Humfrey’s English Palladius (MS. Duke Humfrey d.2)’, Bodleian Library Record, 12.
De la Mare, A. C. 1985bNew research on humanistic scribes in Florence’, in Garzelli, A. (ed.), Miniatura fiorentina del Rinascimento 1440–1525, Florence.
De la Mare, A. C. and Gillam, S. 1988 Duke Humfrey’s library and the Divinity School 1488–1988. An exhibition at the Bodleian Library. Vol. I: De la Mare, A. C., The history of the library; Vol. II: Gillam, S., The history of the building, Oxford.
De la Mare, A. C. and Hellinga, L. 1978The first book printed in Oxford: the Expositio symboli of Rufinus’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 7, 2.
De la Mare, A. C. and Barker-Benfield, B. C. (eds.) 1980 Bodleian Library, Oxford: manuscripts at Oxford: R. W. Hunt memorial exhibition, Oxford.
De la Mare, A. C. and Hunt, R. W. (eds.) 1970 Duke Humfrey and English humanism in the fifteenth century. Catalogue of an exhibition held in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, Oxford.
De Marinis, T. 1947–69 La Biblioteca napoletana dei re d’Aragona, 4 vols., Milan, 1947–52, and supplement, 2 vols., Verona, 1969.
De Ricci, S. 1937 Census of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts in the United States and Canada, 2 vols., New York.
De Rijk, L. M. 1975Logica cantabrigiensis–a fifteenth-century Cambridge manual of logic’, Rev. internationale de philosophie, 29, fasc., ‘In memory of M. Grabmann’.
De Rijk, L. M. 1976Richard Billingham’s works on logic’, Vivarium, 14.
De Rijk, L. M. 1977Logica oxoniensis: an attempt to reconstruct a fifteenth-century Oxford manual of logic’, Medioevo, 3.
De Vocht, H. 1951 History of the foundation and the rise of the Collegium trilingue lovaniense (1517–50), Louvain.
De Winter, P. 1981A book of hours of Queen Isabel la Catolica’, Bull. of the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Deanesly, M. 1920Vernacular books in England in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries’, Modern Language Review, 15.
Deanesly, M. (ed.) 1915 The Incendium amoris of Richard Rolle of Hampole, Manchester.
Dédéyan, C. 1961–6 Dante en Angleterre, 2 vols., Paris.
Delaissé, L. M. J. 1974The importance of books of hours for the history of the medieval book’, in McCracken, U., Randall, L. M. C. and Randall, R. H. Jr (eds.), Gatherings in honor of Dorothy E. Miner, Baltimore MD.
Delisle, L. 1868–81 Le Cabinet des manuscrits de la Bibliothèque impériale [nationale], 3 vols., Paris.
Delisle, L. 1896L’imprimeur parisien Josse Bade et le professeur écossais Jean Vaus’, Bibliothèque de l’Ecole des Chartes, 57.
Delisle, L. 1907 Recherches sur la librairie de Charles V, 2 vols., Paris.
Denholm-Young, N. 1952 Handwriting in England and Wales, Oxford.
Derolez, A. 1979 The library of Raphael de Mercatellis, abbot of St Bavon’s, Ghent, 1437–1508, Ghent.
Destrez, J. 1935 La pecia dans les manuscrits universitaires du XIIIe et du XIVe siècle, Paris.
Devereux, E. J. 1968 A check-list of English translations of Erasmus to 1700, Oxford Bibliographical Society Occasional Publications 3, Oxford.
Devereux, E. J. 1969The publication of the English Paraphrases of Erasmus’, Bulletin of the John Rylands (University) Library, 51.
Dionisotti, A. C. 1995Claude de Seyssel’, in Crawford, M. H. and Ligota, C. R. (eds.), Ancient h istory and the antiquarian. Essays in memory of Arnaldo Momigliano, Warburg Institute Colloquia 2, London.
Dodgson, C. 1929English devotional woodcuts of the late fifteenth century, with special reference to those in the Bodleian Library’, Walpole Society, 17.
Dodgson, C. 1936 English woodcuts of the fifteenth century, Strasbourg.
Dogaer, G. 1975Margaretha van York, bibliofiele’, Handelingen van de Koninklijke kring voor oudheidkunde, letteren en kunst van Mechelen, 79.
Dowling, M. 1986 Humanism in the age of Henry VIII, London.
Dowling, M. 1991Anne Boleyn as patron’, in Starkey, 1991.
Doyle, A. I. 1952Further monastic books’, Durham Philobiblon 1, 7.
Doyle, A. I. 1957The work of a late fifteenth-century scribe, William Ebesham’, Bulletin of the John Rylands (University) Library, 39.
Doyle, A. I. 1958Books connected with the Vere family and Barking Abbey’, Trans. of the Essex Archaeological Soc., n.s., 25.
Doyle, A. I. 1982The manuscripts’, in Lawton, D. (ed.), Middle English alliterative poetry and its literary background, Cambridge.
Doyle, A. I. 1983a ‘English books in and out of court from Edward III to Henry VII’, in Scattergood, and Sherborne, 1983.
Doyle, A. I. 1983bReflexions on some manuscripts of Nicholas Love’s Myrrour of the blessed lyf of Jesu Christ’, Leeds Studies in English, n.s., 14.
Doyle, A. I. 1988The printed books of the last monks of Durham’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 10.
Doyle, A. I. 1989Publication by members of the religious orders’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989.
Doyle, A. I. 1990Book production by the monastic orders in England (c. 1375–1530): assessing the evidence’, in Brownrigg, L. L. (ed.), Medieval book production: assessing the evidence, Los Altos Hills CA.
Doyle, A. I. and Parkes, M. B. 1978The production of copies of the Canterbury Tales and the Confessio Amantis in the early fifteenth century’, in Parkes, M. B. and Watson, A. G. (eds.), Medieval scribes, manuscripts and libraries: essays presented to N. R. Ker, London 1978.
Doyle, A. I. (ed.) 1987 The Vernon manuscript: a facsimile of Bodleian Library, Oxford, MS Eng. Poet. a.1, Cambridge.
Dreyfus, J. 1988The invention of spectacles and the advent of printing’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 10.
Driver, M. W. 1987Illustrations in early English books: methods and problems’, Books at Brown, 33.
Driver, M. W. 1989Pictures in print: late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century English religious books for lay readers’, in Sargent, M. G. (ed.), De cella in seculum: religious and secular life and devotion in late medieval England, Woodbridge.
Driver, M. W. 1995Nuns as patrons, artists, readers: Bridgettine woodcuts in printed books produced for the English market’, in Fisher, C. G. and Scott, K. L. (eds.), Art into life: collected papers from the Kresge Art Museum medieval symposia, East Lansing MI.
Driver, M. W. 1996The illustrated De Worde: an overview’, in Emmerson, R. K. and Sheingorn, P. (eds.), Studies in Iconography, 17.
Driver, M. W. 1997Ideas of order: Wynkyn de Worde and the title page’, in Boffey, J. and Scattergood, V. J. (eds.), Texts in context, Dublin.
Drummond, H. J. H. 1979 A short-title catalogue of books printed on the continent of Europe, 1501–1600, in Aberdeen University Library, Oxford and New York.
Duck, A. Sir 1668 De usu et authoritate juris civilis Romanorum in dominiis principum Christianorum, Leipzig (rpt Vienna and Cologne 1990).
Duff, E. G. 1902 English printing on vellum to the end of the year 1600, Publications of the Bibliographical Society of Lancashire 1, Aberdeen.
Duff, E. G. 1905 A century of the English book trade. Short notices of all printers, stationers, bookbinders, and others connected with it from the issue of the first dated book in 1457 to the incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557, London (rpt 1948).
Duff, E. G. 1906 The printers, stationers and booksellers of Westminster and London from 1476 to 1535, Cambridge.
Duff, E. G. 1907aA bookseller’s accounts, c.1510’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 2nd ser., 8.
Duff, E. G. 1907bEarly Chancery proceedings concerning members of the book trade’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 2nd ser., 8.
Duff, E. G. 1907cSome early Scottish book-bindings and collectors’, Scottish Historical Rev, 4.
Duff, E. G. 1908Notes on stationers from the Lay Subsidy Rolls of 1523–4’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 2nd ser., 9.
Duff, E. G. 1917 Fifteenth century English books, Oxford.
Duffy, E. 1992 The stripping of the altars: traditional religion in England, 1400–1580, New Haven and London.
Duggan, C. 1963 Twelfth-century decretal collections and their importance in English history, London.
Duncan, G. D. 1986Public lectures and professorial chairs’, in HUO, III.
Dunlop, A. I. (ed.) 1964 Acta facultatis artium universitatis Sanctiandree 1413–1588, Edinburgh and London.
Durham, 1838 Catalogues of the Library of Durham Cathedral, at various periods, from the Conquest to the Dissolution, including catalogues of the library of the abbey of Hulne, and of the mss. preserved in the library of Bishop Cosin, at Durham, Surtees Society 7, London.
Durkan, J. 1953The beginnings of humanism in Scotland’, Innes Rev., 4.
Durkan, J. 1959The cultural background in sixteenth-century Scotland’, Innes Rev., 10.
Durkan, J. 1961aAn Arbroath book inventory of 1473’, Bibliotheck, 3.
Durkan, J. 1961bThe library of St Salvator’s College, St Andrews’, Bibliotheck, 3.
Durkan, J. 1976The early history of Glasgow University Library: 1470–1710’, Bibliotheck, 8.
Durkan, J. 1980Early humanism and King’s College’, Aberdeen University Rev., 48.
Durkan, J. 1981Giovanni Ferrerio, humanist: his influence in sixteenth-century Scotland’, in Robbins, K. (ed.), Religion and humanism: papers read at the meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society, Studies in church history 17.
Durkan, J. and Kirk, J. 1977 Glasgow University, 1451–1577, Glasgow.
Durkan, J. and Ross, A. 1961 Early Scottish libraries, Glasgow. (Supplements: Durkan, J., Bibliothek, 4 (1963); 9 (1978); 10 (1981); 11 (1982); 12 (1985).)
Durling, R. J. 1977Linacre and medical humanism’, in Maddison, F. R., Pelling, M. and Webster, C. (eds.), Linacre studies. Essays on the life and work of Thomas Linacre, Oxford.
Dutschke, C. 1989 Guide to medieval and Renaissance manuscripts in the Huntington Library, 2 vols., San Marino CA.
Dyboski, R. and Arend, Z. M. (eds.) 1935 Knyghthode and bataile, Early English Text Society Original Series 201, London.
Eccles, M. (ed.) 1969 The Macro plays, Early English Text Society Original Series 262, London.
Edmunds, S. 1991From Schoeffer to Vérard: concerning the scribes who became printers’, in Hindman, 1991.
Edwards, A. S. G. 1980Poet and printer in sixteenth-century England: Stephen Hawes and Wynkyn de Worde’, Gutenberg-Jahrbuch.
Edwards, A. S. G. 1984 Middle English prose: a critical guide to major authors and genres, New Brunswick NJ.
Edwards, A. S. G. 1991From manuscript to print: Wynkyn de Worde and the printing of contemporary poetry’, Gutenberg-Jahrbuch.
Edwards, A. S. G. 1995Continental influences on London printing and reading in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries’, in Boffey, J. and King, P. (eds.), London and Europe in the later Middle Ages.
Edwards, A. S. G. and Meale, C. M. 1993The marketing of printed books in late medieval England’, Library, 6th ser., 15.
Edwards, A. S. G. and Pearsall, D. 1989The manuscripts of the major English poetic texts’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989.
Edwards, A. S. G. (ed.) 1985 MS Pepys 2006, Norman OK.
Edwards, A. S. G., , Miller C. H. and , Rodgers K. G. (eds.), English poems, Four last things, Life of John Picus, earl of Mirandula, 1997; ii.
Eisner, S. (ed.) 1980 The Kalendarium of Nicholas of Lynn, London.
Elliott, K. 1964Church musick at Dunkell’, Music and Letters, 45.
Ellis, H. Sir (ed.) 1824–46 Original letters illustrative of English history, 1st–3rd ser., 11 vols., London.
Elrington, C. R. (ed.) 1968 Victoria History of the Counties of England, Gloucester, vol. VIII, London.
Elton, G. R. 1974–83 Studies in Tudor and Stuart politics and government, 3 vols., Cambridge.
Elton, G. R. 1978The sessional printing of statutes, 1484 –1547’, in Ives, 1978 (rpt in Elton 1974–83, III).
Elton, G. R. 1981 Policy and police: the enforcement of the Reformation in the age of Thomas Cromwell, Cambridge (rpt).
Elvey, E. M. (ed.) 1975 Courts of the Archdeaconry of Buckingham, 1483–1528, Buckinghamshire Record Soc. 19, London.
Emden, A. B. 1968 Donors of books to S. Augustine’s Abbey Canterbury, Oxford Bibliographical Society, Occasional Pub. 4, Oxford.
Erler, G. (ed.) 1895–1902 Der Matrikel der Universität Leipzig, 3 vols., Codex diplomaticus Saxoniae Regiae, 2. 17, Leipzig.
Erler, M. C. 1984The Maner to lyue well and the coming of English in François Regnault’s primers of the 1520s and 1530s’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 6.
Erler, M. C. 1988Wynkyn de Worde’s will’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 10.
Erler, M. C. 1992Pasted-in embellishments in English manuscripts and printed books c. 1480–1533’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 14.
Erler, M. C. 1993The books and lives of three Tudor women’, in Brink, Jean R. (ed.), Privileging gender in early modern England, Sixteenth-century essays and studies 23, Kirksville MO.
Erler, M. C. 1994Three fifteenth-century vowesses’, in Barron, C. and Sutton, A. (eds.), Medieval London widows, 1300–1500, London.
Evans, T. A. R. 1992The number, origins and careers of scholars’, in HUO, II.
Fairfield, L. P. 1972The mysterious press of “Michael Wood” (1553–1554)’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 27.
Fallows, D. 1977English song repertories of the mid-fifteenth century’, Proc. of the Royal Musical Assoc., 103.
Fallows, D. 1993Henry VIII as a composer’, in Banks, Searle and Turner, 1993.
Farquhar, J. D. 1976 Creation and imitation: the work of a fifteenth-century manuscript illuminator, Fort Lauderdale FL.
Farquhar, J. D. 1980Identity in an anonymous age: Bruges manuscript illuminators and their signs’, Viator, 2.
Farrer, W. and Brownbull, J. (eds.) 1908 Victoria History of the Counties of England, Lancaster, II, London.
Farris, G. 1972 Umanesimo e religione in Lorenzo Guglielmo Traversagni, 1425–1505, Milan.
Fava, D. and Salmi, M. 1950–73 I manoscritti miniati della Biblioteca Estense di Modena, 2 vols., Florence.
Febvre, L. and Martin, H.-J. 1958–76 L’apparition du livre, Paris. Transl. The coming of the book, London, 1976.
Fenlon, I. 1981La difusion de la chanson continentale dans les manuscrits anglais entre 1509–70’, in Vaccaro, J.-M. (ed.), La chanson à la Renaissance. Actes du XXe colloque d’etudes humanistes du Centre d’Etudes Supérieures de la Renaissance de l’Université de Tours, juillet 1977, Tours.
Fenlon, I. 1995 Print and culture in early sixteenth-century Italy (The Panizzi Lectures, 1994), London.
Fenlon, I. (ed.) 1982 Cambridge music manuscripts 900–1700, Cambridge.
Ferdinand, C. Y. 1997Magdalen College and the book-trade: the provision of books in Oxford 1450–1550’, in Hunt, A., Mandelbrote, G. and Shell, A. (eds.), The book trade and its customers, 1450–1900: historical essays for Robin Myers, Winchester and New Castle DE.
Ferme, B. 1989The testamentary executor in Lyndwood’s Provinciale’, Jurist, 49.
Fisher, J. H. (ed.) 1951 The Tretyse of loue, Early English Text Society Original Series 223, London.
Fitzherbert, A. Sir 1516 La graunde abridgement de le ley, London.
Fitzherbert, A. Sir 1534 La nouel natura brevium, London.
Fleming, P. W. 1987The Hautes and their “circle”: culture and the English gentry’, in Williams, D. (ed.), England in the fifteenth century: proceedings of the 1986 Harlaxton Symposium, Woodbridge.
Fletcher, B. Y. (ed.) 1987 Manuscript Trinity College R.3.19, Norman OK.
Fletcher, J. M. 1961Addendum to “Provost Argentine of King’s and his books”’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 3, 3.
Fletcher, J. M. 1967The teaching of arts at Oxford’, Paedagogica historica, 7.
Fletcher, J. M. and McConica, J. K. 1961A sixteenth-century inventory of the libraryof Corpus Christi College, Cambridge’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 3, 33.
Fletcher, J. M 1974A fifteenth-century benefaction to Magdalen College library’, Bodleian Library Record, 9, 3.
Fletcher, J. M 1981Change and resistance to change: a consideration of the development of English and German universities during the sixteenth century’, History of Universities, 1.
Fletcher, J. M 1986The faculty of arts’, in HUO, III.
Fletcher, J. M 1992Developments in the faculty of arts 1370–1530’, in HUO, II.
Fletcher, J. M. (ed.) 1974 Registrum annalium Collegii Mertonensis 1521–1567, Oxford Historical Society n.s. 24, Oxford.
Flynn, J. 1995The education of choristers in England during the sixteenth century’, in Morehen, 1995.
Flynn, V. J. 1943The grammatical writings of William Lily, ?1468–?1523’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 37.
Fogelmark, S. 1990 Flemish and related panel-stamped bindings, New York.
Foley, S. M. and Miller, C. H. (eds.), The Answer to a poisoned Book, 1985.
Foot, M. M. 1978 The Henry Davis Gift, I, London.
Foot, M. M. 1992The future of bookbinding research’, in Davison, 1992.
Foot, M. M. 1993 Studies in the history of bookbinding, Aldershot.
Fortescue, J. Sir 1942 De laudibus legum Anglie, ed. Chrimes, S. B., Cambridge.
Fowler, T. 1893 The history of Corpus Christi College, Oxford Historical Society 25, Oxford.
Fox, D. 1977Manuscripts and prints of Scots poetry in the sixteenth century’, in Aitken, A. J. et al. (eds.), Bards and makars, Glasgow.
Fox, D. and Ringler, W. A. (eds.) 1980 The Bannatyne manuscript, Edinburgh.
Foxe, J. 1877–9 Acts and monuments of John Foxe, ed. Cattley, S. R. and Pratt, J., 8 vols., London.
Francis, F. C. (ed.) 1945 The Bibliographical Society 1892–1942: studies in retrospect, London.
Fryde, E. B. 1983The library of Lorenzo de’ Medici’, in Fryde, , Humanism and Renaissance historiography, London.
Fugler, P. 1983The Lambeth and Caius choirbooks’, Jnl of the Plainsong and Mediaeval Music Soc., 6.
Fuller, T. 1840 History of the University of Cambridge, ed. Prickett, M. and Wright, T., Cambridge.
Furnivall, F. J. 1867Pynson’s contracts with Horman for his Vulgaria, and Palsgrave for the Lesclairissement, with Pynson’s letter of denization’, Trans. of the Philological Soc..
Furnivall, F. J. 1868The Neville and Southwell families of Mereworth in Kent’, Notes and Queries, 4th ser., 2.
Gabel, L. C. 1928–9 Benefit of clergy in England in the later Middle Ages, Smith College Studies in History 14, Northampton, MA (rpt 1969).
Gairdner, J. (ed.) 1858 Historia Regis Henrici Septimi, Rolls Series 10, London.
Gameson, R. and Coates, A. 1988 The Old Library, Trinity College, Oxford, Oxford.
Gardiner, S. 1933 The letters of Stephen Gardiner, ed. Muller, J. A., Cambridge.
Garrod, H. W. 1928The library regulations of a medieval college’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 8.
Garton, C. 1980A fifteenth-century headmaster’s library’, Lincolnshire History and Archaeology, 15.
Gaskell, P. 1972 A new introduction to bibliography, Oxford.
Gaskell, P. 1980 Trinity College Library: the first 150 years. The Sandars Lectures, 1978–9, Cambridge.
Gaskell, P. 1983An early inventory of Trinity College books’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 8, 33.
Geoghegan, D. 1957A license of Henry VI to practise alchemy’, Ambix 6.
Geritz, A. J. and Laine, A. L. 1983 John Rastell, Boston, MA.
Getz, F. M., 1992The faculty of medicine before 1500’, in HUO, II.
Getz, F. M. (ed.)1991 Healing and society in medieval England: a Middle English translation of the pharmaceutical writings of Gilbertus Anglicus, Madison WI.
Giard, L. 1985La production logique de l’Angleterre au 16e siècle’, Les études philosophiques, 3.
Gibson, G. M. 1989 The theater of devotion: East Anglian drama and society in the late Middle Ages, Chicago and London.
Gibson, R. W. 1961 St Thomas More: a preliminary bibliography of his works and of Moreana to the year 1750, New Haven and London.
Gibson, S. 1903 Early Oxford bindings, Oxford Bibliographical Society Illustrated Monographs 10, Oxford.
Gibson, S. (ed.) 1931 Statuta antiqua Universitatis Oxoniensis, Oxford.
Gillespie, V. 1984Lukynge in haly bukes: lectio in some late medieval spiritual miscellanies’, Analecta Cartusiana, 106.
Gillespie, V. 1989Vernacular books of religion’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989.
Given-Wilson, C. J. 1986 The Royal household and the king’s affnity: service, politics and finance in England, 1360–1413, New Haven and London.
Glazebrook, P. R. 1972 Introduction to Sir Fitzherbert, A., The newe boke of justices of the peas (1538), London.
Gleason, J. B. 1982The earliest evidence for ecclesiastical censorship of printed books in England’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 4.
Goldberg, P. J. P. 1994Lay book ownership in late medieval York: the evidence of wills’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 6th ser., 16.
Goldschmidt, E. P. 1943 Medieval texts and their first appearance in print, London (rpt 1965).
Goldschmidt, E. P. 1955 The first Cambridge press in its European setting, Cambridge.
Goody, J. (ed.) 1968 Literacy in traditional societies, Cambridge.
Goulet, R. 1965 Compendium recenter editum de multiplici Parisiensis Universitatis magnificentia, 1517
Grafton, A. 1981Teacher, text and pupil in the Renaissance class-room: a case study from a Parisian college’, History of Universities, 1.
Grafton, A. 1985Renaissance readers and ancient texts: comments on some commentaries’, Renaissance Quarterly 38 ; rpt Grafton, , Defenders of the text: the traditions of scholarship in an age of science, 1450–1800, Cambridge MA and London 1991.
Grafton, A. 1997How Guillaume Budé read his Homer’, in Grafton, A., Commerce with the classics: ancient books and Renaissance readers (Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures 20), Ann Arbor MI.
Grafton, A. 1997aIs the history of reading a marginal enterprise? Guillaume Budé and his books’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 91.
Grafton, A. and Jardine, L. A. 1986 From humanism to the humanities: education and the liberal arts in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Europe, London.
Grafton, A. and Jardine, L. A. 1990“Studied for action”: how Gabriel Harvey read his Livy’, Past and Present, 129.
Grafton, A. (ed.) 1993 Rome reborn: the Vatican Library and Renaissance culture, Washington DC and New Haven.
Graham, H. J. 1954The Rastells and the printed English law book of the Renaissance’, Law Lib. Jnl, 47.
Graham, H. J. 1965The first Englishing and printing of the medieval statutes at large’, UCLA Law Rev, 13.
Graham, H. J. and Heckel, J. W. 1958The Book that “made” the common law’, Law Lib. Jnl, 51.
Gras, N. S. B. 1918 The early English customs system, Harvard Economic Stud. 18, Cambridge MA.
Gray, D. 1961A Middle English epitaph’, Notes and Queries, 206.
Gray, D. 1963The five wounds of our Lord’, Notes and Queries, 208.
Gray, G. J. 1904 The earlier Cambridge stationers and bookbinders and the first Cambridge printer, Bibliographical Soc. Illust. Monographs 13, London.
Gray, G. J. and Palmer, W. M. 1915 Abstracts from the wills and testamentary documents of printers, binders and stationers of Cambridge, from 1504 to 1699, London.
Green, R. F. 1980 Poets and princepleasers: literature and the English court in the late Middle Ages, Toronto.
Green, R. F. 1976King Richard II’s books revisited’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 31.
Greenslade, S. L. 1963English versions of the Bible 1525–1611’, in Greenslade, S. L. (ed.), The Cambridge history of the Bible. Vol. III: The West from the Reformation to the present day, Cambridge.
Greg, W. W. 1945Bibliography – a retrospect’, Studies in Retrospect, 23–31.
Greg, W. W. 1956 Some aspects and problems of London publishing between 1550 and 1650, Oxford.
Greg, W. W. 1966Ad imprimendum solum’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 9 (rpt in Greg, , Collected papers, ed. Maxwell, J. C., Oxford 1966).
Griffiths, A. 1996 Prints and printmaking: an introduction to the history and techniques, London.
Groag Bell, S. 1992Medieval women book owners: arbiters of lay piety and ambassadors of culture’, Signs, 7.
Guiges, I. 1984 Coutumes de Chartreuse, ed. Un Chartreux, Sources chrétiennes 313, Paris.
Gunner, W. H. 1858Catalogue of books belonging to the College of St Mary, Winchester, in the reign of Henry VI’, Archaeological Jnl, 15.
Gurewich, V. 1957Observations on the iconography of the wound in Christ’s side’, JWCI, 20.
Guy, J. A. 1977 The Cardinal’s court: the impact of Thomas Wolsey on the Star Chamber, Hassocks.
Guy, J. A. 1988 Tudor England, Oxford (rpt 1990).
Guy, J. A., Keen, R., Miller, C. H. and McGugan, R. (eds.), The Debellation of Salem and Bizance, 1987.
Gwosdek, H. 1991 Early printed editions of the Long Accidence and Short Accidence grammars, Heidelberg.
Gwosdek, H. 1993Subject matter and its arrangement in the Accedence manuscripts and in the early printed Long Accidence and Short Accidence Grammars’, Leeds Stud. in English, n.s., 24.
Gwosdek, H. 1994A new fragment of the early printed Long Accidence grammar’, Bulletin of the John Rylands (University) Library, 76.
Haines, C. R. 1928The library of Dover Priory: its catalogue and extant volumes’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 8.
Hale, W. H. (ed.) 1847 A series of precedents and proceedings … 1475 to 1640, London.
Halkin, L.–E., Bierlaire, F. and Hoven, R. 1972 Introduction to Opera omnia Desiderii Erasmi Roterodami, Amsterdam 1969–, 1, 3, Amsterdam.
Hallam, E. M. and Roper, M. 1978The capital and the records of the nation: seven centuries of housing the public records of London’, London Jnl, 4.
Halyburton, A. 1867 The Ledger of Andrew Halyburton. Conservator of the privileges of the Scottish nation in the Netherlands, 1492–1503, Edinburgh.
Hamburger, J. 1991The Casanatense and the Carmelite missals: continental sources for English manuscript illumination of the early 15th century’, in Horst, K. and Clamt, J.-C. (eds.), Masters and miniatures. Proceedings of the congress on medieval manuscript illumination in the northern Netherlands (Utrecht, 10–13 December 1989), Doornspijk.
Hamesse, J. (ed.) 1974. Les Auctoritates Aristotelis. Un florilège médiéval. Etude historique et édition critique, Philosophes médiévaux 17, Louvain, Paris.
Hammond, E. P. 1904MS Longleat 258: a Chaucerian codex’, Modern Language Notes, 19.
Hammond, E. P. (ed.) 1927 English verse between Chaucer and Surrey, Durham NC.
Hands, Rachel (ed.) 1975 English hunting and hawking in the Boke of St Albans, facsim., London.
Hanham, A. (ed.) 1975 The Cely letters, 1472–1488, Early English Text Society 273, London.
Hanna, R. III, 1989aSir Thomas Berkeley and his patronage’, Speculum, 64.
Hanna, R. III (ed.), 1989b The Ellesmere manuscript. A working facsimile, Cambridge.
Hannay, M. P. (ed.). 1985 Silent but for the word: Tudor women as patrons, translators, and writers of religious works, Kent OH.
Hargreaves, H. 1969The Wycliffite versions’, in Lampe, G. W. H. (ed.), The Cambridge history of the Bible. Vol. II: The West from the Fathers to the Reformation, Cambridge.
Harper-Bill, C. (ed.) 1987–91 The Register of John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1486–1500, 2 vols., Canterbury and York Society, London.
Harrier, R. 1975 The canon of Sir Thomas Wyatt’s poetry, Cambridge MA.
Harris, J. 1995 Greek emigrés in the West 1400–1520, Camberley.
Harris, K. 1983The origins and make-up of Cambridge University Library MS Ff. 1. 6’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 8, 33.
Harris, K. 1989Patrons, buyers and owners: the evidence for ownership, and the role of book owners in book production and the book trade’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989, 163–99.
Harrison, F. L. 1980 Music in medieval Britain, 4th edn, Buren.
Harrison, F. L. (ed.) 1956–67 The Eton choirbook, Musica Britannica 10–12, London: 2nd edn, 10 only.
Harriss, G. L. 1972Henry V’s books’, in McFarlane, K. B. (ed.), Lancastrian kings and Lollard knights, Oxford.
Harrod, H. 1855Extracts from early Norfolk wills’, Norfolk Archaeology, 4.
Härtel, H. and Hellinga, L. (eds.) 1981 Buch und Text im 15. Jahrhundert. Book and text in the 15th century. Arbeitsgespräch in der Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel … proceedings of a conference held in the Herzog August Bibliothek … 1978, Hamburg.
Harthan, J. 1977 The book of hours, London and New York.
Hatcher, J. 1977 Plague, population and the English economy 1348–1530, London.
Haveley, N. R. 1980 Chaucer’s Boccaccio, Cambridge.
Headley, J. M. (ed.), Responsio ad Lutherum, 1969.
Heale, E. 1995Women and the courtly love lyric: the Devonshire ms. (British Library, London Add. 17492)’, Modern Language Review, 90.
Heath, Terrence 1971Logical grammar, grammatical logic and humanism in three German universities’, Studies in the Renaissance, 18.
Hector, L. C. 1966 The handwriting of English documents, 2nd edn, London.
Hellinga, L. 1981aThe Book of St Albans 1486’, in Hamel, C. F. R. and Linenthal, R. A. (eds.), Fine books and book collecting: books and manuscripts acquired from Alan G. Thomas … Leamington Spa.
Hellinga, L. 1981bThe Malory manuscript and Caxton’, in Takamiya, T. and Brewer, D. (eds.), Aspects of Malory, Cambridge.
Hellinga, L. 1982 Caxton in focus: the beginning of printing in England, London.
Hellinga, L. 1983Manuscripts in the hands of printers’, in Trapp, 1983.
Hellinga, L. 1987Three notes on printers’ copy: Strassburg, Oxford, Subiaco’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 9, 33.
Hellinga, L. 1988“Aesopus moralisatus”, Antwerp 1488 in the hands of English owners: some thoughts on the study of the trade in Latin books’, in Milde, W. and Schuder, W. (eds.), De captu lectoris. Wirkungen des Buchs im 15. und 16. Jt. dargestellt an aus-gewählten Handschriften und Drucken, Berlin and New York.
Hellinga, L. 1991aImportation of books printed on the Continent into England and Scotland before c. 1520’, in Hindman, 1991.
Hellinga, L. 1991bReading an engraving: William Caxton’s dedication to Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy’, in Roach, S. (ed.), Across the narrow seas: studies in the history and bibliography of Britain and the Low Countries presented to Anna C. Simoni, London.
Hellinga, L. 1994Peter Schoeffer and the book-trade in Mainz: evidence for the organization’, in Rhodes, D. E. (ed.), Bookbindings & other bibliophily: essays in honour of Anthony Hobson, Verona.
Hellinga, L. 1995Wynkyn de Worde’s native land’, in Beadle, R. and Piper, A. J. (eds.), New science out of old books: studies in manuscripts and early printed books in honour of A. I. Doyle, Aldershot.
Hellinga, L. 1997aNicholas Love in print’, in Oguro, S., Beadle, R. and Sargent, M. G. (eds.), Nicholas Love at Waseda: proceedings of the international conference 20–22 July 1995, Woodbridge.
Hellinga, L. 1997bText and press in the first decades of printing’, in Libri, tipografi, biblioteche: ricerche storiche dedicate a Luigi Balsamo, Biblioteca di bibliografia Italiana 148, Florence.
Hellinga, L. and Hellinga, W. 1974Regulations relating to the planning and organization of work by the master printer in the Ordinances of Christopher Plantin’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 29.
Hellinga, L. and Goldfinch, J. (eds.) 1987 Bibliography and the study of fifteenth-century civilization, British Library, London Occasional Papers 5, London.
Hellinga, W. Gs 1962 Copy and print in the Netherlands: an atlas of historical bibliography, with introductory essays by Verwey, H. Fontaine and Ovink, G. W., Amsterdam.
Helmholz, R. H. 1974 Marriage litigation in medieval England, Cambridge.
Helmholz, R. H. 1987 Canon law and the law of England, London and Ronceverte WV.
Helmholz, R. H. 1990 Roman canon law in Reformation England, Cambridge.
Helmholz, R. H. 1992Canon law in post-Reformation England’, in Canon law in Protestant lands, Berlin.
Henderson, E. G. 1975Legal literature and the impact of printing on the English legal profession’, Law Lib. Jnl, 68.
Henkel, N. 1988 Deutsche Übersetzungen lateinischer Schultexte: Ihre Verbreitung und Funktion in der frühen Neuzeit, mit einem Verzeichnis der Texte, Munich.
Herendeen, W. M. and Bartlett, K. R. 1991The library of Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of Durham: British Library, London, Add. MS 40676’, Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 85.
Hill, G. 1964The sermons of John Watson, canon of Aberdeen’, Innes Rev., 15.
Hills, R. 1992John Tate and his paper: England’s first paper mill’, in Morris, H. (ed.), Three lions and the Cross of Lorraine: Bartholomaeus Anglicus, John of Trevisa, John Tate, Wynkyn de Worde, and ‘De proprietatibus rerum’, Newtown PA.
Hillyard, B. 1994Durkan and Ross revisited’, in MacDonald, , Lynch and Cowan 1994.
Hilton, W. 1991 The Scale of Perfection, trans. Clark, J. P. H. and Dorward, R., New York.
Hind, A. M. 1935 An introduction to a history of woodcut, with a detailed survey of work done in the fifteenth century, London.
Hind, A. M. 1952 Engraving in England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, pt 1: The Tudor period, Cambridge.
Hindman, S. (ed). 1991 Printing the written word: the social history of books, circa 1450–1520, Ithaca NY and London.
Hindman, S. and Farquhar, J. D. (eds.) 1977 Pen to press: illustrated manuscripts and printed books in the first century of printing, Baltimore MD.
Hinman, C. 1963 The printing and proof-reading of the First Folio of Shakespeare, Oxford.
Hirsch, R. 1967 Printing, selling and reading 1450–1550, Wiesbaden.
Hobson, G. D. 1929 Bindings in Cambridge libraries, Cambridge.
Hofman, M. and Morehen, J. (eds.) 1987 Latin music in British sources c. 1485–c. 1610 (Early English church music, supplementary vol. II), London.
Holbrook, S. E. 1987Margery Kempe and Wynkyn de Worde’, in Glasscoe, M. (ed.), The Medieval mystical tradition in England: Exeter symposium IV, Dartington 1987, Cambridge.
Holman, P. 1991Music at the court of Henry VII’, in Starkey, 1991.
Holmes, R. R. 1893 Specimens of royal fine and historical bookbinding selected from the Royal Library, Windsor Castle, London.
Holthöfer, E. 1977Die Literatur zum gemeinen und partikularen Recht in Italien, Frankreich, Spanien und Portugal’, in Coing, 1973–7, II, 1.
Horn, N. 1973Die legistische Literatur der Kommentatoren und der Ausbreitung des gelehrten Rechts’, in Coing, 1973–7, I.
Horstmann, C. (ed.) 1886 The Three kings of Cologne. An early English translation of the ‘Historia trium regum’ by John of Hildesheim, Early English Text Society Original Series 85, London.
Hoskins, E. 1901 Horae Beatae Mariae Virginis, or Sarum and York primers, with kindred books and primers of the reformed Roman rite, London.
Howell, W. S. 1956 Logic and rhetoric in England, 1500–1700, Princeton.
Hubay, I. 1979Die bekannten Exemplare der zweiundvierzigzeilen Bible und ihre Besitzer’, in Schmitt, W. and Schmidt-Künsenmüller, F. A. (eds.), Johannes Gutenbergs zweiundvierzigzeilige Bibel … Kommentarband, Munich.
Hudson, A. 1983“No newe thyng”: the printing of medieval texts in the early Reformation period’, in Gray, D. and Stanley, E. G. (eds.), Middle English studies presented to Norman Davis, Oxford.
Hudson, A. 1985 Lollards and their books, London.
Hudson, A. 1988 The premature Reformation: Wycliffite texts and Lollard history, Oxford.
Hudson, A. 1989Lollard book-production’, in Griffiths, J. and Pearsall, D. A., Book production and publishing in Britain 1375–1475, Cambridge 1989, 125–42.
Hudson, A. 1994Laicus literatus’, in Biller, and Hudson, 1994.
Hughes, A. 1982 Medieval manuscripts for mass and office: a guide to their organization and terminology, Toronto.
Hughes, J. 1988 Pastors and visionaries: religion and secular life in late medieval Yorkshire, Woodbridge.
Hughes, M. J. 1984Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy: diplomat, patroness, bibliophile, and benefactress’, Private Library, 3rd. ser., 7.
Hull, S. 1982 Chaste, silent and obedient: English books for women 1475–1640, San Marino CA.
Hume, A. 1973English Protestant books printed abroad, 1525–1535; an annotated bibliography’, The Yale edition of the works of St Thomas More, New Haven and London: I.
Hunt, R. W. 1950–1The manuscript collection of University College, Oxford’, Bodleian Library Record, 3.
Hunt, R. W. 1950Medieval inventories of Clare College Library’, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society, 1, 33.
Hunt, R. W. 1978The library of the abbey of St Albans’, in Parkes, M. B. and Watson, A. G. (eds.), Medieval scribes, manuscripts and libraries: essays presented to N. R. Ker, London 1978.
Hunt, T. 1987The “Novel Cirurgerie” in MS London, British Library, Harley 2558’, Zeitschrift für romanische Philologie, 103.
Hunt, T. 1991 Teaching and learning Latin in thirteenth-century England, 3 vols., Woodbridge.
Hunter, D. 1978 Papermaking: the history and technique of an ancient craft, rev. edn, New York, London.
Hunter, G. K. 1951The marking of “sententiae” in Elizabethan printed plays, poems and romances’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 5th ser., 6.
Hunter, J. 1831 English monastic libraries, London.
Hutchinson, A. M. 1989Devotional reading in the monastery and in the late medieval household’, in Sargent, 1989.
Hutton, R. 1987The local impact of the Tudor Reformations’, in Haigh, C. (ed.), The English Reformation revised, Cambridge.
Inderwick, F. A. 1896–1919 A calendar of the Inner Temple records, 1505–1714, 3 vols., London.
Inderwick, F. A. Iniunccions geven by the kynges maiestie … M.D.XLVII, 1547, London.
Isaac, F. 1930–2 English & Scottish printing types 1501–35, 1508–41; 1535–58, 1552–58, Bibliographical Soc. Illustrated Monographs 2, Oxford.
Isaac, F. 1931Egidius van der Erve and his English printed books’, The Library. Transactions of the Bibliographical Society, 4th ser., 12.