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  • Print publication year: 2008
  • Online publication date: May 2012

22 - The Discourses of Practitioners in Japan

from PART VI - THE DISCOURSES OF PRACTITIONERS ON MEDICAL ETHICS
Summary
Japanese medical ethics developed in the framework of a unique discourse integrating concepts of nature, the human body, and medical practice. The understanding and practice of medicine in Japan has been strongly influenced by the acceptance of medical knowledge from countries such as China, Korea, Spain, Portugal, Netherlands, Germany, Britain, France, and United States. In ancient Japan, according to its mythology, disease was understood as a punishment and/or curse of kami. The ancient Japanese believed that there were various kami (god) and evil spirits that possessed living human being and caused different types of disease. People believed that widespread epidemic diseases, famines, and political disorders were caused by traditional gods who were angry because the people had accepted Buddhism. Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism had enormous impact on Japanese political, cultural, social, and religious life.
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The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics
  • Online ISBN: 9781139195812
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521888790
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