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Claiming the Union
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Book description

This book examines Southerners' claims to loyal citizenship in the reunited nation after the American Civil War. Southerners - male and female; elite and non-elite; white, black, and American Indian - disagreed with the federal government over the obligations citizens owed to their nation and the obligations the nation owed to its citizens. Susanna Michele Lee explores these clashes through the operations of the Southern Claims Commission, a federal body that rewarded compensation for wartime losses to Southerners who proved that they had been loyal citizens of the Union. Lee argues that Southerners forced the federal government to consider how white men who had not been soldiers and voters, and women and racial minorities who had not been allowed to serve in those capacities, could also qualify as loyal citizens. Postwar considerations of the former Confederacy potentially demanded a reconceptualization of citizenship that replaced exclusions by race and gender with inclusions according to loyalty.

Reviews

'This important addition to postbellum Southern and US history brings into focus contributions from various sources to the understanding of citizenship in the US … Highly recommended.'

J. P. Sanson Source: Choice

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Contents

Bibliography

Primary Sources

Court of Claims, Committee on Claims, and Southern Claims Commission Records

General Records of the Department of the Treasury, 1789–1990. Records of the Division of Captured Property, Claims, and Lands, 1855–1900. Records of the Commissioner of Claims (Southern Claims Commission), 1871–1880. Microfilm Publication M87. Record Group 56. National Archives, Washington, DC.
Records of the Accounting Officers of the Department of the Treasury, 1775–1927. Records of the Land, Files, and Miscellaneous Division. Southern Claims Commission, Allowed Claims, 1871–1880. Record Group 217. National Archives, Washington, DC.
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Records of the United States House of Representatives, 1789–1990. Southern Claims Commission, 1871–1880. Summary Reports of the Commissioners of Claims in All Cases Reported to Congress as Disallowed Under the Act of March 3, 1871. Microfilm Publication P2257. Record Group 233. National Archives, Washington, DC.
Records of the United States House of Representatives, 1789–1990. Southern Claims Commission, Barred and Disallowed Claims, 1871–1880. Microfiche Publication M1407. Record Group 233. National Archives, Washington, DC.
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Supreme Court Cases

Armstrong v. United States (1871)
Congressional Globe, 1861–1898
Ex Parte Garland (1866)
Pargoud v. United States (1868)
Pargoud v. United States (1871)
United States Census, 1860 and 1870
United States v. Klein (1871)
United States v. Padelford (1869)

Newspapers and Periodicals

Athens Messenger, 1876
Atlanta Daily Constitution, 1878
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Cedar Rapids Times, 1876
Charleston Daily Courier, 1872
DeBow’s Review, 1851, 1855
Douglass’ Monthly, 1861
Edwardsville Intelligencer, 1876
Harpers’ Weekly, 1860–1880
Milwaukee Daily News, 1875
National Intelligencer, 1861
New York Times, 1860–1800
Orrville Crescent, 1876
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Richmond Daily Dispatch, 1861, 1876
Richmond Enquirer, 1861
Richmond Whig, 1861
The Advance, 1876
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