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Cultures of Legality
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  • Cited by 11
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Leifsen, Esben Sánchez-Vázquez, Luis and Reyes, Maleny Gabriela 2017. Claiming prior consultation, monitoring environmental impact: counterwork by the use of formal instruments of participatory governance in Ecuador’s emerging mining sector. Third World Quarterly, Vol. 38, Issue. 5, p. 1092.


    Michel, Verónica 2017. The role of prosecutorial independence and prosecutorial accountability in domestic human rights trials. Journal of Human Rights, Vol. 16, Issue. 2, p. 193.


    Moral, Mert and Tokdemir, Efe 2017. Justices ‘en Garde’: Ideological determinants of the dissolution of anti-establishment parties. International Political Science Review, Vol. 38, Issue. 3, p. 264.


    Gallagher, Janice 2017. The Last Mile Problem: Activists, Advocates, and the Struggle for Justice in Domestic Courts. Comparative Political Studies, Vol. 50, Issue. 12, p. 1666.


    2017. World Development Report 2017: Governance and the Law. p. 83.

    Nelken, David 2016. Comparative Legal Research and Legal Culture: Facts, Approaches, and Values. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Vol. 12, Issue. 1, p. 45.


    Rosaldo, Manuel 2016. Revolution in the Garbage Dump: The Political and Economic Foundations of the Colombian Recycler Movement, 1986-2011. Social Problems, Vol. 63, Issue. 3, p. 351.


    Liu, Sida 2015. Law's Social Forms: A Powerless Approach to the Sociology of Law. Law & Social Inquiry, Vol. 40, Issue. 1, p. 1.


    Murphy, Michael 2014. Self-determination as a Collective Capability: The Case of Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Vol. 15, Issue. 4, p. 320.


    CONAGHAN, CATHERINE M. 2012. Prosecuting Presidents: The Politics within Ecuador's Corruption Cases. Journal of Latin American Studies, Vol. 44, Issue. 04, p. 649.


    Picq, Manuela Lavinas 2012. Between the Dock and a Hard Place: Hazards and Opportunities of Legal Pluralism for Indigenous Women in Ecuador. Latin American Politics and Society, Vol. 54, Issue. 2, p. 1.


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    Cultures of Legality
    • Online ISBN: 9780511730269
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511730269
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Book description

Ideas about law are undergoing dramatic change in Latin America. The consolidation of democracy as the predominant form of government and the proliferation of transnational legal instruments have ushered in an era of new legal conceptions and practices. Law has become a core focus of political movements and policy-making. This volume explores the changing legal ideas and practices that accompany, cause, and are a consequence of the judicialization of politics in Latin America. It is the product of a three-year international research effort, sponsored by the Law and Society Association, the Latin American Studies Association, and the Ford Foundation, that gathered leading and emerging scholars of Latin American courts from across disciplines and across continents.

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