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  • Print publication year: 2010
  • Online publication date: December 2010

Section 1 - Pain Definitions

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The Essence of Analgesia and Analgesics
  • Online ISBN: 9780511841378
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511841378
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References

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References

1. SinatraRS, BighamM. The anatomy and pathophysiology of acute pain. In GrassJA, ed. Problems in Anesthesiology. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven, 1997.
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References

1. Bonica’s Management of Pain, 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001.
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