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Grain Legumes
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    Kumar, Vinay Chattopadhyay, Arnab Ghosh, Sumit Irfan, Mohammad Chakraborty, Niranjan Chakraborty, Subhra and Datta, Asis 2016. Improving nutritional quality and fungal tolerance in soya bean and grass pea by expressing an oxalate decarboxylase. Plant Biotechnology Journal, Vol. 14, Issue. 6, p. 1394.


    Akter, Laila Mahbub, Moontaha Habib, Md. Ahashan and Alam, Sheikh Shamimul 2015. Characterization of Three Varieties of <i>Lathyrus sativus</i> L. by Fluorescent Karyotype and RAPD Analysis. CYTOLOGIA, Vol. 80, Issue. 4, p. 457.


    Nubankoh, Phakchana Pimtong, Sarocha Somta, Prakit Dachapak, Sujinna and Srinives, Peerasak 2015. Genetic diversity and population structure of pencil yam (Vigna lanceolata) (Phaseoleae, Fabaceae), a wild herbaceous legume endemic to Australia, revealed by microsatellite markers. Botany, Vol. 93, Issue. 3, p. 183.


    Sharma, Vikas Rana, Maneet Katoch, Megha Sharma, Pawan Kumar Ghani, Minerva Rana, Jai Chand Sharma, Tilak Raj and Chahota, Rakesh Kumar 2015. Development of SSR and ILP markers in horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum), their characterization, cross-transferability and relevance for mapping. Molecular Breeding, Vol. 35, Issue. 4,


    Sharma, Vikas Sharma, Tilak Raj Rana, Jai Chand and Chahota, Rakesh Kumar 2015. Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) Using RAPD and ISSR Markers. Agricultural Research, Vol. 4, Issue. 3, p. 221.


    She, C.-W. Jiang, X.-H. Ou, L.-J. Liu, J. Long, K.-L. Zhang, L.-H. Duan, W.-T. Zhao, W. Hu, J.-C. and Keurentjes, J. 2015. Molecular cytogenetic characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of the seven cultivatedVignaspecies (Fabaceae). Plant Biology, Vol. 17, Issue. 1, p. 268.


    Smýkal, Petr Coyne, Clarice J. Ambrose, Mike J. Maxted, Nigel Schaefer, Hanno Blair, Matthew W. Berger, Jens Greene, Stephanie L. Nelson, Matthew N. Besharat, Naghmeh Vymyslický, Tomáš Toker, Cengiz Saxena, Rachit K. Roorkiwal, Manish Pandey, Manish K. Hu, Jinguo Li, Ying H. Wang, Li X. Guo, Yong Qiu, Li J. Redden, Robert J. and Varshney, Rajeev K. 2015. Legume Crops Phylogeny and Genetic Diversity for Science and Breeding. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, Vol. 34, Issue. 1-3, p. 43.


    Boivin, Nicole Crowther, Alison Prendergast, Mary and Fuller, Dorian Q. 2014. Indian Ocean Food Globalisation and Africa. African Archaeological Review, Vol. 31, Issue. 4, p. 547.


    Govarthanan, Muthusamy Park, Sung-Hee Kim, Jin-Won Lee, Kui-Jae Cho, Min Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan and Oh, Byung-Taek 2014. STATISTICAL OPTIMIZATION OF ALKALINE PROTEASE PRODUCTION FROM BRACKISH ENVIRONMENTBacillussp. SKK11 BY SSF USING HORSE GRAM HUSK. Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Vol. 44, Issue. 2, p. 119.


    Gresta, Fabio Rocco, Concetta Lombardo, Grazia M. Avola, Giovanni and Ruberto, Giuseppe 2014. Agronomic Characterization and α- and β-ODAP Determination through the Adoption of New Analytical Strategies (HPLC-ELSD and NMR) of Ten Sicilian Accessions of Grass Pea. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 62, Issue. 11, p. 2436.


    Kim, Sue K. Lee, Taeyoung Kang, Yang Jae Hwang, Won Joo Kim, Kil Hyun Moon, Jung-Kyung Kim, Moon Young and Lee, Suk-Ha 2014. Genome-wide comparative analysis of flowering genes between Arabidopsis and mungbean. Genes & Genomics, Vol. 36, Issue. 6, p. 799.


    Shrivastava, Divya Verma, Priyanka and Bhatia, Sabhyata 2014. Expanding the repertoire of microsatellite markers for polymorphism studies in Indian accessions of mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). Molecular Biology Reports, Vol. 41, Issue. 9, p. 5669.


    Smýkal, Petr Jovanović, Živko Stanisavljević, Nemanja Zlatković, Bojan Ćupina, Branko Đorđević, Vuk Mikić, Aleksandar and Medović, Aleksandar 2014. A comparative study of ancient DNA isolated from charred pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds from an Early Iron Age settlement in southeast Serbia: inference for pea domestication. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, Vol. 61, Issue. 8, p. 1533.


    Tuda, M. Wu, L.-H. Yamada, N. Wang, C.-P. Wu, W.-J. Buranapanichpan, S. Kagoshima, K. Chen, Z.-Q. Teramoto, K. K. Kumashiro, B. R. and Heu, R. 2014. Host shift capability of a specialist seed predator of an invasive plant: roles of competition, population genetics and plant chemistry. Biological Invasions, Vol. 16, Issue. 2, p. 303.


    Aneja, Bharti Yadav, Neelam R. Yadav, Ram C. and Kumar, Ram 2013. Sequence related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) analysis for genetic diversity and micronutrient content among gene pools in mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek]. Physiology and Molecular Biology of Plants, Vol. 19, Issue. 3, p. 399.


    Kongjaimun, Alisa Somta, Prakit Tomooka, Norihiko Kaga, Akito Vaughan, Duncan A. and Srinives, Peerasak 2013. QTL mapping of pod tenderness and total soluble solid in yardlong bean [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata cv.-gr. sesquipedalis]. Euphytica, Vol. 189, Issue. 2, p. 217.


    2013. Dr. Joseph Smartt (1931–2013). Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, Vol. 60, Issue. 7, p. 1921.


    Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja Palit, Paramita Kumar, Ch Sridhar Reddy, D. Srinivas and Sharma, Kiran K. 2012. Improving Crop Productivity in Sustainable Agriculture.


    Girma, Dejene and Korbu, Lijalem 2012. Genetic improvement of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) in Ethiopia: an unfulfilled promise. Plant Breeding, Vol. 131, Issue. 2, p. 231.


    Upadhyaya, H. D. Dwivedi, S. L. Ambrose, M. Ellis, N. Berger, J. Smýkal, P. Debouck, D. Duc, G. Dumet, D. Flavell, A. Sharma, S. K. Mallikarjuna, N. and Gowda, C. L. L. 2011. Legume genetic resources: management, diversity assessment, and utilization in crop improvement. Euphytica, Vol. 180, Issue. 1, p. 27.


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    Grain Legumes
    • Online ISBN: 9780511525483
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511525483
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Book description

This volume provides a wide-ranging survey of all the major grain legumes from the standpoint of both their evolution and their potential for further development and improvement as economically important food crops. The legumes have a vital role to play in both the developed and developing worlds by providing an alternative nitrogen source to the artificial fertilizers, which, although boosting cereal yields, often have had adverse environmental effects. The grain legumes are a valuable crop possessing the ability to fix nitrogen by Rhizobium biosynthesis and thus contribute to the natural nitrogen cycle. The book surveys the changes which have occurred in the course of domestication of the plants which have evolved into our pulse crops and oilseed legume crops. The author then discusses the benefits to be gained from evaluation and improvement of grain legume genetic resources. It is through this comparative approach that the overall potential of these crops is highlighted.

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