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  • Print publication year: 2019
  • Online publication date: December 2018

Introduction

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      • Introduction
      • Chris Moffat, Queen Mary University of London
      • Book: India's Revolutionary Inheritance
      • Online publication: 21 December 2018
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108655194.001
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      • Introduction
      • Chris Moffat, Queen Mary University of London
      • Book: India's Revolutionary Inheritance
      • Online publication: 21 December 2018
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108655194.001
      Available formats
      ×

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      • Introduction
      • Chris Moffat, Queen Mary University of London
      • Book: India's Revolutionary Inheritance
      • Online publication: 21 December 2018
      • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108655194.001
      Available formats
      ×

Summary

Chapter 1 traces Bhagat Singh’s entry into anti-colonial politics by foregrounding the concept of transgression. Departing from conventional narratives that stress the role of familial influence on the young revolutionary’s ideation, I consider instead how he came to privilege critique and rupture in his political practice. I focus on Bhagat Singh’s participation in an experimental pedagogical project in interwar Lahore – the Tilak School of Politics – founded in the 1920s by the nationalist leader Lala Lajpat Rai to channel the emancipatory potential of emerging social scientific disciplines into anti-colonial struggle. In addition to providing a new framework for understanding Bhagat Singh’s intellectual biography, the chapter illuminates a heretofore overlooked period in the history of Indian social science, using the example of the Tilak School and its direct connections to the New York–based Rand School and Oxford-based Ruskin College to reveal a global conversation around the concept of a ‘political education’.