Skip to main content Accesibility Help
×
×
Home
The Linguistic Legacy of Spanish and Portuguese
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 40
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Operstein, Natalie 2018. Lingua Franca between pidginization and koineization. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages, Vol. 33, Issue. 2, p. 307.

    Clements, J. Clancy 2018. Speech communities, language varieties, and typology. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages, Vol. 33, Issue. 1, p. 174.

    Jackson-Eade, Joseph A. B. 2018. The Role of Interpreters during the Early Portuguese Presence in East Africa. Eastern African Literary and Cultural Studies, Vol. 4, Issue. 3-4, p. 179.

    Ludwig, Ralph Pagel, Steve and Mühlhäusler, Peter 2018. Linguistic Ecology and Language Contact.

    Versteegh, Kees 2018. Language of empire, language of power. Language Ecology, Vol. 2, Issue. 1-2, p. 1.

    Clements, J. Clancy 2018. Speech communities, language varieties, and typology. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages, Vol. 33, Issue. 2, p. 411.

    Clements, J. Clancy 2018. Negation and Negative Concord. Vol. 55, Issue. , p. 211.

    Lipski, John M. 2018. The Handbook of Dialectology. p. 498.

    Baxter, Alan N. 2018. The Portuguese Language Continuum in Africa and Brazil. Vol. 20, Issue. , p. 293.

    Sessarego, Sandro and King, Jeremy 2018. Language Variation and Contact-Induced Change. Vol. 340, Issue. , p. 1.

    Muysken, Pieter 2017. Multidisciplinary Approaches to Bilingualism in the Hispanic and Lusophone World. Vol. 13, Issue. , p. 313.

    Arcodia, Giorgio Francesco 2017. On Sinitic influence on Macanese. Language Ecology, Vol. 1, Issue. 2, p. 158.

    He, Jiani 2017. Late Qing Multilingualism and National Linguistic Practice in the Qing Borderlands. History Compass, Vol. 15, Issue. 2, p. e12338.

    Sessarego, Sandro 2017. Chocó Spanish double negation and the genesis of the Afro-Hispanic dialects of the Americas. Diachronica, Vol. 34, Issue. 2, p. 219.

    Sessarego, Sandro 2017. Chocó Spanish and the Missing Spanish Creole debate. Language Ecology, Vol. 1, Issue. 2, p. 213.

    Sippola, Eeva 2017. Creole Studies – Phylogenetic Approaches. p. 375.

    Sessarego, Sandro 2017. The legal hypothesis of creole genesis. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages, Vol. 32, Issue. 1, p. 1.

    Sippola, Eeva 2017. Creole Studies – Phylogenetic Approaches. p. 241.

    Guy, Gregory R. 2017. Language Contact in Africa and the African Diaspora in the Americas. Vol. 53, Issue. , p. 49.

    Amaral, Patrícia 2016. The Present Perfect borders: A study in language contact. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages, Vol. 31, Issue. 1, p. 16.

    ×

Book description

The historical spread of Spanish and Portuguese throughout the world provides a rich source of data for linguists studying how languages evolve and change. This volume analyses the development of Portuguese and Spanish from Latin and their subsequent transformation into several non-standard varieties. These varieties include Portuguese- and Spanish-based creoles, Bozal Spanish and Chinese Coolie Spanish in Cuba, Chinese Immigrant Spanish, Andean Spanish, and Barranquenho, a Portuguese variety on the Portugal-Spain border. Clancy Clements demonstrates that grammar formation not only takes place in parent-to-child communication, but also, importantly, in adult-to-adult communication. He argues that cultural identity is also an important factor in language formation and maintenance, especially in the cases of Portuguese, Castilian, and Barranquenho. More generally, the contact varieties of Portuguese and Spanish have been shaped by demographics, by prestige, as well as by linguistic input, general cognitive abilities and limitations, and by the dynamics of speech community.

Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content items to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between #date#. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed