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    Menicanin, Danijela Mrozik, Krzysztof Marek Wada, Naohisa Marino, Victor Shi, Songtao Bartold, P. Mark and Gronthos, Stan 2014. Periodontal-Ligament-Derived Stem Cells Exhibit the Capacity for Long-Term Survival, Self-Renewal, and Regeneration of Multiple Tissue Types in Vivo. Stem Cells and Development, Vol. 23, Issue. 9, p. 1001.


    Hynes, K. Menicanin, D. Han, J. Marino, V. Mrozik, K. Gronthos, S. and Bartold, P.M. 2013. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from iPS Cells Facilitate Periodontal Regeneration. Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 92, Issue. 9, p. 833.


    Ge, Shaohua Mrozik, Krzysztof Marek Menicanin, Danijela Gronthos, Stan and Bartold, P Mark 2012. Isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cell-like cells from healthy and inflamed gingival tissue: potential use for clinical therapy. Regenerative Medicine, Vol. 7, Issue. 6, p. 819.


    Siggers, Kevin Frei, Hanspeter Fernlund, Göran and Rossi, Fabio 2010. Effect of bone graft substitute on marrow stromal cell proliferation and differentiation. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, Vol. 9999A, p. NA.


    Menicanin, Danijela Bartold, P. Mark Zannettino, Andrew C.W. and Gronthos, Stan 2010. Identification of a Common Gene Expression Signature Associated with Immature Clonal Mesenchymal Cell Populations Derived from Bone Marrow and Dental Tissues. Stem Cells and Development, Vol. 19, Issue. 10, p. 1501.


    Kawai, Masanobu and Rosen, Clifford J. 2009. Marrow Fat and Bone: New Insights from Mice and Humans. Clinical Reviews in Bone and Mineral Metabolism, Vol. 7, Issue. 3, p. 216.


    McCarty, Rosa C. Gronthos, Stan Zannettino, Andrew C. Foster, Bruce K. and Xian, Cory J. 2009. Characterisation and developmental potential of ovine bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. Journal of Cellular Physiology, Vol. 219, Issue. 2, p. 324.


    Lin, N.-H. Menicanin, D. Mrozik, K. Gronthos, S. and Bartold, P. M. 2008. Putative stem cells in regenerating human periodontium. Journal of Periodontal Research, p. ???.


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  • Print publication year: 1998
  • Online publication date: January 2010

5 - Marrow stromal adipocytes

Summary

Introduction

Development

The presence of adipocytes in marrow can be traced back phylogenetically to those species where the bone marrow first appears as a haematopoietic organ. In mammals, the extent of bone marrow adipogenesis is age related. In the neonate, the marrow cavity is filled predominantly with ‘red’ haematopoietic marrow and adipocytes are rarely seen. Soon after birth, adipocytes can be found in the periphery of the axial skeleton; for example, in the distal digits and tail vertebrae. With advancing age, there is a gradual replacement of the haematopoietic marrow with ‘yellow’ fatty marrow, a process which accelerates after puberty. The extent of development of fatty marrow correlates with the overall size and surface area : volume ratio of the animal. Thus, in the relatively small adult mouse, fatty marrow is limited to the distal tibia and fibula and the tail vertebrae, whereas in man it is present in up to 50% of the skeleton. The bulk is found in the long bones of the appendicular skeleton and, by the third decade of life, ≥90% of the femoral marrow cavity is occupied by fat. The development with age of marrow adipose tissue results from an increase in both the number and size of adipocytes (see also Bianco & Riminucci, Chapter 2).

Changes in the volume of marrow adipose tissue have also been correlated with the development of temperature gradients within the body.

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Marrow Stromal Cell Culture
  • Online ISBN: 9780511623219
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511623219
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