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Post-Broadcast Democracy
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  • Cited by 506
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Haas, Michael 2019. Why Democracies Flounder and Fail. p. 139.

    Dennis, James 2019. Beyond Slacktivism. p. 71.

    McCarthy-Latimer, Christopher and Kendrick, Jr., J. Richard 2019. Civic Engagement and Politics. p. 78.

    Neuman, W. Russell 2019. Three guys walk into a bar: an information theoretic analysis. Information, Communication & Society, Vol. 22, Issue. 2, p. 193.

    Stroud, Natalie Jomini Feldman, Lauren Wojcieszak, Magdalena and Bimber, Bruce 2019. The Consequences of Forced Versus Selected Political Media Exposure. Human Communication Research, Vol. 45, Issue. 1, p. 27.

    Lu, Yanqin and Lee, Jae Kook 2019. Stumbling upon the other side: Incidental learning of counter-attitudinal political information on Facebook. New Media & Society, Vol. 21, Issue. 1, p. 248.

    Marshall, John 2019. Signaling Sophistication: How Social Expectations Can Increase Political Information Acquisition. The Journal of Politics, Vol. 81, Issue. 1, p. 167.

    Eimhjellen, Ivar 2019. Civic Engagement in Scandinavia. p. 135.

    Dennis, James 2019. Beyond Slacktivism. p. 123.

    Medders, Ryan B. and Metzger, Miriam J. 2018. The Role of News Brands and Leads in Exposure to Political Information on the Internet. Digital Journalism, Vol. 6, Issue. 5, p. 599.

    González Arce, José Damián 2018. La adaptación de la fiscalidad aduanera a los intereses repobladores, comerciales y políticos. Andalucía, 1241-1550. Hispania, Vol. 78, Issue. 258, p. 39.

    Feldman, Lauren Wojcieszak, Magdalena Stroud, Natalie Jomini and Bimber, Bruce 2018. Explaining Media Choice: The Role of Issue-Specific Engagement in Predicting Interest-Based and Partisan Selectivity. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, Vol. 62, Issue. 1, p. 109.

    McCabe, Ellen 2018. Living the Stories We Create. p. 11.

    Taneja, Harsh Wu, Angela Xiao and Edgerly, Stephanie 2018. Rethinking the generational gap in online news use: An infrastructural perspective. New Media & Society, Vol. 20, Issue. 5, p. 1792.

    Wattenberg, Martin P. 2018. Polls and Elections : From the Obama Youthquake of '08 to the Trumpquake of '16: How Young People's Dislike of Hillary Clinton Cost Her the Election. Presidential Studies Quarterly,

    Hopkins, Daniel J. 2018. The Exaggerated Life of Death Panels? The Limited but Real Influence of Elite Rhetoric in the 2009–2010 Health Care Debate. Political Behavior, Vol. 40, Issue. 3, p. 681.

    Beam, Michael A Child, Jeffrey T Hutchens, Myiah J and Hmielowski, Jay D 2018. Context collapse and privacy management: Diversity in Facebook friends increases online news reading and sharing. New Media & Society, Vol. 20, Issue. 7, p. 2296.

    Dubois, Elizabeth and Blank, Grant 2018. The echo chamber is overstated: the moderating effect of political interest and diverse media. Information, Communication & Society, Vol. 21, Issue. 5, p. 729.

    Beam, Michael A. Hutchens, Myiah J. and Hmielowski, Jay D. 2018. Facebook news and (de)polarization: reinforcing spirals in the 2016 US election. Information, Communication & Society, Vol. 21, Issue. 7, p. 940.

    Kümpel, Anna Sophie 2018. The Issue Takes It All?. Digital Journalism, p. 1.

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Book description

The media environment is changing. Today in the United States, the average viewer can choose from hundreds of channels, including several twenty-four hour news channels. News is on cell phones, on iPods, and online; it has become a ubiquitous and unavoidable reality in modern society. The purpose of this 2007 book is to examine systematically, how these differences in access and form of media affect political behaviour. Using experiments and survey data, it shows how changes in the media environment reverberate through the political system, affecting news exposure, political learning, turnout, and voting behaviour.

Reviews

'… a generally convincing and thought provoking explantory account of the political repercussions wrought by changes in the media environment in the last 70 years … the book is essential reading for political scientists interested in individual political behaviour and the broader implications for democratic competition.'

Source: Journal of Politics

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