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Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
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  • Cited by 3
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Sytsma, Justin and Machery, Edouard 2012. The Two Sources of Moral Standing. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, Vol. 3, Issue. 3, p. 303.


    Pelletier, Kevin 2009. Uncle Tom's Cabinand Apocalyptic Sentimentalism. Lit: Literature Interpretation Theory, Vol. 20, Issue. 4, p. 266.


    Thurston, Thomas 2007. SLAVERY: ANNUAL BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SUPPLEMENT (2006). Slavery & Abolition, Vol. 28, Issue. 3, p. 407.


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    Race, Slavery, and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature
    • Online ISBN: 9780511485640
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511485640
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Book description

Moving boldly between literary analysis and political theory, contemporary and antebellum US culture, Arthur Riss invites readers to rethink prevailing accounts of the relationship between slavery, liberalism, and literary representation. Situating Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Frederick Douglass at the center of antebellum debates over the person-hood of the slave, this 2006 book examines how a nation dedicated to the proposition that 'all men are created equal' formulates arguments both for and against race-based slavery. This revisionary argument promises to be unsettling for literary critics, political philosophers, historians of US slavery, as well as those interested in the link between literature and human rights.

Reviews

Review of the hardback:'Riss is a deft, polished writer and a gifted literary scholar.'

Source: Literature & History

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