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Seasonality in Primates
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  • Cited by 39
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Aw, Wen C. Garvin, Michael R. and Ballard, J. William O. 2019.

    Rina Evasoa, Mamy Radespiel, Ute Hasiniaina, Alida F. Rasoloharijaona, Solofonirina Randrianambinina, Blanchard Rakotondravony, Romule and Zimmermann, Elke 2018. Variation in reproduction of the smallest-bodied primate radiation, the mouse lemurs (Microcebus spp.): A synopsis. American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 80, Issue. 7, p. e22874.

    Hicks, Allison L. Lee, Kerry Jo Couto-Rodriguez, Mara Patel, Juber Sinha, Rohini Guo, Cheng Olson, Sarah H. Seimon, Anton Seimon, Tracie A. Ondzie, Alain U. Karesh, William B. Reed, Patricia Cameron, Kenneth N. Lipkin, W. Ian and Williams, Brent L. 2018. Gut microbiomes of wild great apes fluctuate seasonally in response to diet. Nature Communications, Vol. 9, Issue. 1,

    Masi, Shelly and Breuer, Thomas 2018. Dialium seed coprophagy in wild western gorillas: Multiple nutritional benefits and toxicity reduction hypotheses. American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 80, Issue. 4, p. e22752.

    Hou, Rong He, Shujun Wu, Fan Chapman, Colin A. Pan, Ruliang Garber, Paul A. Guo, Songtao and Li, Baoguo 2018. Seasonal variation in diet and nutrition of the northern-most population of Rhinopithecus roxellana . American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 80, Issue. 4, p. e22755.

    Kamilar, Jason M. and Beaudrot, Lydia 2018. Effects of Environmental Stress on Primate Populations. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 47, Issue. 1, p. 417.

    Trapanese, Cinzia Meunier, Hélène and Masi, Shelly 2018. What, where and when: spatial foraging decisions in primates. Biological Reviews,

    Donati, Giuseppe Santini, Luca Eppley, Timothy M. Arrigo-Nelson, Summer J. Balestri, Michela Boinski, Sue Bollen, An Bridgeman, LeAndra L. Campera, Marco Carrai, Valentina Chalise, Mukesh K. Derby Lewis, Abigail Hohmann, Gottfried Kinnaird, Margaret F. Koenig, Andreas Kowalewski, Martin Lahann, Petra McLennan, Matthew R. Nekaris, Anna K. I. Nijman, Vincent Norscia, Ivan Ostner, Julia Polowinsky, Sandra Y. Schülke, Oliver Schwitzer, Christoph Stevenson, Pablo R. Talebi, Mauricio G. Tan, Chia Tomaschewski, Irene Vogel, Erin R. Wright, Patricia C. and Ganzhorn, Jörg U. 2017. Low Levels of Fruit Nitrogen as Drivers for the Evolution of Madagascar’s Primate Communities. Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, Issue. 1,

    Bach, Thanh H. Chen, Jin Hoang, Minh D. Beng, Kingsly C. and Nguyen, Van T. 2017. Feeding behavior and activity budget of the southern yellow-cheeked crested gibbons (Nomascus gabriellae ) in a lowland tropical forest. American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 79, Issue. 8, p. e22667.

    Oelze, Vicky M. 2016. Reconstructing temporal variation in great ape and other primate diets: A methodological framework for isotope analyses in hair. American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 78, Issue. 10, p. 1004.

    Oelze, Vicky M. Douglas, Pamela Heidi Stephens, Colleen R. Surbeck, Martin Behringer, Verena Richards, Michael P. Fruth, Barbara Hohmann, Gottfried and Halcrow, Siân E 2016. The Steady State Great Ape? Long Term Isotopic Records Reveal the Effects of Season, Social Rank and Reproductive Status on Bonobo Feeding Behavior. PLOS ONE, Vol. 11, Issue. 9, p. e0162091.

    TIAN, Jundong WANG, Baishi WANG, Zhenlong LIU, Jindong and LU, Jiqi 2015. Effects of social and climatic factors on birth sex ratio inMacaca mulattain Mount Taihangshan area. Integrative Zoology, Vol. 10, Issue. 2, p. 199.

    D'Agostino, Justin and Cunningham, Clare 2015. Preliminary investigation of flexibility in learning color-reward associations in gibbons (Hylobatidae). American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 77, Issue. 8, p. 854.

    Owens, Jacob R. Honarvar, Shaya Nessel, Mark and Hearn, Gail W. 2015. From frugivore to folivore: Altitudinal variations in the diet and feeding ecology of the Bioko Island drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus poensis). American Journal of Primatology, Vol. 77, Issue. 12, p. 1263.

    Garvin, Michael R. Bielawski, Joseph P. Sazanov, Leonid A. and Gharrett, Anthony J. 2015. Review and meta-analysis of natural selection in mitochondrial complex I in metazoans. Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research, Vol. 53, Issue. 1, p. 1.

    Sen Majumder, Sreejani Bhadra, Anindita and Matsunami, Hiroaki 2015. When Love Is in the Air: Understanding Why Dogs Tend to Mate when It Rains. PLOS ONE, Vol. 10, Issue. 12, p. e0143501.

    Lambert, Joanna E. and Rothman, Jessica M. 2015. Fallback Foods, Optimal Diets, and Nutritional Targets: Primate Responses to Varying Food Availability and Quality. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 44, Issue. 1, p. 493.

    Thompson, Cynthia L. Williams, Susan H. Glander, Kenneth E. Teaford, Mark F. and Vinyard, Christopher J. 2014. Body temperature and thermal environment in a generalized arboreal anthropoid, wild mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata). American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 154, Issue. 1, p. 1.

    Wartmann, Flurina M. Juárez, Cecilia P. and Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo 2014. Size, Site Fidelity, and Overlap of Home Ranges and Core Areas in the Socially Monogamous Owl Monkey (Aotus azarae) of Northern Argentina. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 35, Issue. 5, p. 919.

    Irwin, Mitchell T. Raharison, Jean-Luc Raubenheimer, David Chapman, Colin A. and Rothman, Jessica M. 2014. Nutritional correlates of the “lean season”: Effects of seasonality and frugivory on the nutritional ecology of diademed sifakas. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 153, Issue. 1, p. 78.

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Book description

The emergence of the genus Homo is widely linked to the colonization of 'new' highly seasonal savannah habitats. However, until recently, our understanding of the possible impact of seasonality on this shift has been limited because we have little general knowledge of how seasonality affects the lives of primates. This book documents the extent of seasonality in food abundance in tropical woody vegetation, and then presents systematic analyses of the impact of seasonality in food supply on the behavioural ecology of non-human primates. Syntheses in this volume then produce broad generalizations concerning the impact of seasonality on behavioural ecology and reproduction in both human and non-human primates, and apply these insights to primate and human evolution. Written for graduate students and researchers in biological anthropology and behavioural ecology, this is an absorbing account of how seasonality may have affected an important episode in our own evolution.

Reviews

Review of the hardback:'In this well structured and detailed book Brockman and Schaik discuss the major role that seasonality plays in influencing the ecology and behaviour of primate species … I would highly recommend this book to anyone with an existing interest in primatology or evolutionary anthropology … All in all it offers an interesting and thought-provoking read.'

Hannah E. Parathian - University of Oxford

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