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Sentimental Narrative and the Social Order in France, 1760–1820
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  • Cited by 19
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    Sajó, András 2016. Emotions in Constitutional Institutions. Emotion Review, Vol. 8, Issue. 1, p. 44.

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    Vincent, K. Steven 2011. Benjamin Constant and the Birth of French Liberalism. p. 129.

    Stearns, Peter N. and Reddy, William M. 2009. Historical Research on the Self and Emotions. Emotion Review, Vol. 1, Issue. 4, p. 302.

    Festa, Lynn 2009. Sentimental Visions of Empire in Eighteenth-Century Studies. Literature Compass, Vol. 6, Issue. 1, p. 23.

    Lafrance, Geneviève 2008. Qui perd gagne. p. 337.

    Rapport, Nigel 2007. An Outline for Cosmopolitan Study. Current Anthropology, Vol. 48, Issue. 2, p. 257.

    Lee, Haiyan 2001. All the Feelings That Are Fit to Print. Modern China, Vol. 27, Issue. 3, p. 291.

    Reddy, William M. 2000. Sentimentalism and Its Erasure: The Role of Emotions in the Era of the French Revolution. The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 72, Issue. 1, p. 109.

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    Sentimental Narrative and the Social Order in France, 1760–1820
    • Online ISBN: 9780511519499
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511519499
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Book description

In this discerning study of sentimental discourse of the late eighteenth century, David J. Denby sheds new light on Enlightenment thought and sensibility. He reveals how sentimental sub-literature reflects the social attitudes of the emerging bourgeoisie, and how its formal structures are reflected in contemporary theories concerning the nature of society, morality, and politics. Denby explores how the language and forms of sentimental narratives were adopted and exploited by political and social writers, and how sentimentalism provided a theme of continuity underlying the dominant sense of change brought about by the Revolution. In this interdisciplinary book Denby argues that sentimentalism is central to the culture of late eighteenth-century France. Texts discussed include works by Rousseau and de Staël.

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