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Sources, Sinks and Sustainability
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  • Cited by 9
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Pärt, Tomas Knape, Jonas Low, Matthew Öberg, Meit and Arlt, Debora 2017. Disentangling the effects of date, individual, and territory quality on the seasonal decline in fitness. Ecology, Vol. 98, Issue. 8, p. 2102.

    Cáceres, Aimy Melo, Martim Barlow, Jos and Mills, Michael S. L. 2016. Radiotelemetry reveals key data for the conservation of Sheppardia gabela (Rand, 1957) in the Angolan Escarpment forest. African Journal of Ecology, Vol. 54, Issue. 3, p. 317.

    Furrer, Roman D. and Pasinelli, Gilberto 2016. Empirical evidence for source-sink populations: a review on occurrence, assessments and implications. Biological Reviews, Vol. 91, Issue. 3, p. 782.

    Holt, Robert D. and Barfield, Michael 2015. The influence of imperfect matching habitat choice on evolution in source–sink environments. Evolutionary Ecology, Vol. 29, Issue. 6, p. 887.

    Teller, Brittany J. Miller, Adam D. Shea, Katriona and Cadotte, Marc 2015. Conservation of passively dispersed organisms in the context of habitat degradation and destruction. Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 52, Issue. 2, p. 514.

    Wing, SR and Jack, L 2014. Fiordland: the ecological basis for ecosystem management. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, Vol. 48, Issue. 4, p. 577.

    Loreau, Michel Daufresne, Tanguy Gonzalez, Andrew Gravel, Dominique Guichard, Frédéric Leroux, Shawn J. Loeuille, Nicolas Massol, François and Mouquet, Nicolas 2013. Unifying sources and sinks in ecology and Earth sciences. Biological Reviews, Vol. 88, Issue. 2, p. 365.

    Wing, SR Beer, NA and Jack, L 2012. Resource base of blue cod Parapercis colias subpopulations in marginal fjordic habitats is linked to chemoautotrophic production. Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 466, Issue. , p. 205.

    Morris, Douglas W. and Dupuch, Angélique 2012. Habitat change and the scale of habitat selection: shifting gradients used by coexisting Arctic rodents. Oikos, Vol. 121, Issue. 6, p. 975.

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Book description

Source-sink theories provide a simple yet powerful framework for understanding how the patterns, processes and dynamics of ecological systems vary and interact over space and time. Integrating multiple research fields, including population biology and landscape ecology, this book presents the latest advances in source-sink theories, methods and applications in the conservation and management of natural resources and biodiversity. The interdisciplinary team of authors uses detailed case studies, innovative field experiments and modeling, and comprehensive syntheses to incorporate source-sink ideas into research and management, and explores how sustainability can be achieved in today's increasingly fragile human-dominated ecosystems. Providing a comprehensive picture of source-sink research as well as tangible applications to real world conservation issues, this book is ideal for graduate students, researchers, natural-resource managers and policy makers.

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