Skip to main content
×
Home
Statistics for Real-Life Sample Surveys
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 14
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Bartlett, Andrew Lewis, Jamie and Williams, Matthew L. 2016. Generations of interdisciplinarity in bioinformatics. New Genetics and Society, Vol. 35, Issue. 2, p. 186.


    Butler, Brett J. Hewes, Jaketon H. Dickinson, Brenton J. Andrejczyk, Kyle Butler, Sarah M. and Markowski-Lindsay, Marla 2016. USDA Forest Service National Woodland Owner Survey: national, regional, and state statistics for family forest and woodland ownerships with 10+ acres, 2011-2013.

    Tagne-Fotso, Romuald Leroyer, Ariane Howsam, Mike Dehon, Betty Richeval, Camille and Nisse, Catherine 2016. Current sources of lead exposure and their relative contributions to the blood lead levels in the general adult population of Northern France: The IMEPOGE Study, 2008–2010. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A, Vol. 79, Issue. 6, p. 245.


    Jones, Matthew and Williams, Matthew L. 2015. Twenty years on: lesbian, gay and bisexual police officers' experiences of workplace discrimination in England and Wales. Policing and Society, Vol. 25, Issue. 2, p. 188.


    Williams, Matthew and Levi, Michael 2015. Perceptions of the eCrime controllers: Modelling the influence of cooperation and data source factors. Security Journal, Vol. 28, Issue. 3, p. 252.


    Matijasevich, Alicia Murray, Elizabeth Stein, Alan Anselmi, Luciana Menezes, Ana M. Santos, Iná S. Barros, Aluísio J.D. Gigante, Denise P. Barros, Fernando C. and Victora, Cesar G. 2014. Increase in child behavior problems among urban Brazilian 4-year olds: 1993 and 2004 Pelotas birth cohorts. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol. 55, Issue. 10, p. 1125.


    O’Neill, B. 2014. Some Useful Moment Results in Sampling Problems. The American Statistician, Vol. 68, Issue. 4, p. 282.


    Williams, Matthew L. and Hudson, Kirsty 2013. Public perceptions of internet, familial and localised sexual grooming: Predicting perceived prevalence and safety. Journal of Sexual Aggression, Vol. 19, Issue. 2, p. 218.


    Aadland, David Anatchkova, Bistra Grandjean, Burke D. Shogren, Jason F. Simon, Benjamin and Taylor, Patricia A. 2012. Valuing Access to U.S. Public Lands: A Pricing Experiment to Inform Federal Policy*. Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 93, Issue. 1, p. 248.


    Singh, Ranjit Lichter, Michael I. Danzo, Andrew Taylor, John and Rosenthal, Thomas 2012. The Adoption and Use of Health Information Technology in Rural Areas: Results of a National Survey. The Journal of Rural Health, Vol. 28, Issue. 1, p. 16.


    Knüppel, Lothar and Hermsen, Oliver 2010. Median split, k-group split, and optimality in continuous populations. AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis, Vol. 94, Issue. 1, p. 53.


    Méndez, V. Ernesto Bacon, Christopher M. Olson, Meryl Petchers, Seth Herrador, Doribel Carranza, Cecilia Trujillo, Laura Guadarrama-Zugasti, Carlos Cordón, Antonio and Mendoza, Angel 2010. Effects of Fair Trade and organic certifications on small-scale coffee farmer households in Central America and Mexico. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, Vol. 25, Issue. 03, p. 236.


    Ramm, David J. 2008. High-precision orbital parameters for the short-period spectroscopic binary HD 159656 – an eccentric orbit confirmed for an old but active system. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 387, Issue. 1, p. 220.


    Dieleman, Marjolein Bwete, Vincent Maniple, Everd Bakker, Mirjam Namaganda, Grace Odaga, John and van der Wilt, Gert Jan 2007. 'I believe that the staff have reduced their closeness to patients': an exploratory study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on staff in four rural hospitals in Uganda. BMC Health Services Research, Vol. 7, Issue. 1,


    ×
  • Export citation
  • Recommend to librarian
  • Recommend this book

    Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

    Statistics for Real-Life Sample Surveys
    • Online ISBN: 9780511543265
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511543265
    Please enter your name
    Please enter a valid email address
    Who would you like to send this to? *
    ×
  • Buy the print book

Book description

Samples used in social and commercial surveys, especially of the general population, are usually less random (often by design) than many people using them realise. Unless it is understood, this 'non-randomness' can compromise the conclusions drawn from the data. This book introduces the challenges posed by less-than-perfect samples, giving background knowledge and practical guidance for those who have to deal with them. It explains why samples are, and sometimes should be, non-random in the first place; how to assess the degree of non-randomness; when correction by weighting is appropriate and how to apply it; and how the statistical treatment of these samples must be adapted. Extended data examples show the techniques at work. This is a book for practising researchers. It is a reference for the methods and formulae needed to deal with commonly encountered situations and, above all, a source of realistic and implementable solutions.

Reviews

    • Aa
    • Aa
Refine List
Actions for selected content:
Select all | Deselect all
  • View selected items
  • Export citations
  • Download PDF (zip)
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to Dropbox
  • Send to Google Drive
  • Send content to

    To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to .

    To send content to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

    Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

    Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

    Please be advised that item(s) you selected are not available.
    You are about to send:
    ×

Save Search

You can save your searches here and later view and run them again in "My saved searches".

Please provide a title, maximum of 40 characters.
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 51 *
Loading metrics...

Book summary page views

Total views: 98 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 30th March 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.