Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-dxj8b Total loading time: 0.335 Render date: 2023-01-31T17:18:44.995Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Musical hallucinosis: case reports and possible neurobiological models

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 June 2014

Ramon Mocellin*
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatry Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Mark Walterfang
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatry Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Dennis Velakoulis
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatry Unit, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
*
Ramon Mocellin, Level 2, John Cade Building, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria 3050 Australia. Tel: +61 3 93428750; Fax: +61 3 93428483; E-mail: ramon.mocellin@nh.org.au

Abstract

Objective:

The perception of music without a stimulus, or musical hallucination, is reported in both organic and psychiatric disorders. It is most frequently described in the elderly with associated hearing loss and accompanied by some degree of insight. In this setting it is often referred to as ‘musical hallucinosis’. The aim of the authors was to present examples of this syndrome and review the current understanding of its neurobiological basis.

Method:

We describe three cases of persons experiencing musical hallucinosis in the context of hearing deficits with varying degrees of associated central nervous system abnormalities.

Results:

Putative neurobiological mechanisms, in particular those involving de-afferentation of a complex auditory recognition system by complete or partial deafness, are discussed in the light of current information from the literature.

Conclusion:

Musical hallucinosis can be experienced in those patients with hearing impairment and is phenomenologically distinct for hallucinations described in psychiatric disorders.

Type
Case report
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Blackwell Munksgaard

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Berrios, GE. Musical hallucinations. A historical and clinical study. Br J Psychiatry 1990;156:188194. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mocellin, R, Walterfang, M, Velakoulis, D. Neuropsychiatry of complex visual hallucinations. Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2006;40:742751. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cerrato, P, Imperiale, D, Giraudo, Met al. Complex musical hallucinosis in a professional musician with a left subcortical haemorrhage. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2001;71:280281. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evers, S, Ellger, T. The clinical spectrum of musical hallucinations. J Neurol Sci 2004;227:5565. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
E Fischer, C, Marchie, A, Norris, M. Musical and auditory hallucinations: a spectrum. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2004;58:9698. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Griffiths, TD. Musical hallucinosis in acquired deafness. Phenomenology and brain substrate. Brain 2000;123 (Pt 10):20652076. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Griffiths, TD, Buchel, C, Frackowiak, RS, Patterson, RD. Analysis of temporal structure in sound by the human brain. Nat Neurosci 1998;1:422427. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zatorre, RJ, Evans, AC, Meyer, E. Neural mechanisms underlying melodic perception and memory for pitch. J Neurosci 1994;14:19081919. Google ScholarPubMed
Penhune, VB, Zattore, RJ, Evans, AC. Cerebellar contributions to motor timing: a PET study of auditory and visual rhythm reproduction. J Cogn Neurosci 1998;10:752765. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murata, S, Naritomi, H, Sawada, T. Musical auditory hallucinations caused by a brainstem lesion. Neurology 1994;44:156158. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schielke, E, Reuter, U, Hoffmann, O, Weber, JR. Musical hallucinations with dorsal pontine lesions. Neurology 2000;55:454455. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Douen, AG, Bourque, PR. Musical auditory hallucinosis from Listeria rhombencephalitis. Can J Neurol Sci 1997;24:7072. CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nagaratnam, N, Virk, S, Brdarevic, O. Musical hallucinations associated with recurrence of a right occipital meningioma. British J Clin Pract 1996;50:5657. Google ScholarPubMed
Stephane, M, Hsu, LK. Musical hallucinations: interplay of degenerative brain disease, psychosis, and culture in a Chinese woman. J Nerv Ment Dis 1996;184:5961. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baba, A, Hamada, H. Musical hallucinations in schizophrenia. Psychopathology 1999;32:242251. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Musical hallucinosis: case reports and possible neurobiological models
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Musical hallucinosis: case reports and possible neurobiological models
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Musical hallucinosis: case reports and possible neurobiological models
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *