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Epidemiology: what it is and why it matters: Invited commentary on … Cannabis use and psychosis

  • Brendan D. Kelly
Abstract

Epidemiology is the study of why, how and how often diseases occur in given populations. There is now a sufficiency of epidemiological evidence for psychiatrists to warn that cannabis use could increase risk of psychosis in later life. The policy impact of this accumulated epidemiological evidence is difficult to predict. There is a strong need to develop models of mental health policy-making that incorporate careful interpretation of epidemiological evidence.

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References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Epidemiology: what it is and why it matters: Invited commentary on … Cannabis use and psychosis

  • Brendan D. Kelly
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