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Portfolio-based learning in medical education

  • Antonina Ingrassia

Summary

The use of portfolios has rapidly expanded in recent years and is now relevant to a number of different aspects of professional practice in medicine in general and psychiatry in particular, including training, appraisal and revalidation as well as continuing professional development. In this article I will examine the background of important changes and new trends in medical education on which the increasing use of portfolios is based, their potential value as learning and assessment tools, and some of the challenges and dilemmas associated with their use.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Antonina Ingrassia, Greenwich CAMHS, Highpoint House, Shooters Hill, London SE18 3RZ, UK. Email: antonina.ingrassia@oxleas.nhs.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of Interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Portfolio-based learning in medical education

  • Antonina Ingrassia
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