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Post-traumatic stress disorder, resilience and vulnerability

  • Ayesha S. Ahmed
Abstract

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), recognised as a diagnostic entity in 1980, was originally associated with combat or war experiences. It has since been recognised that it is prevalent in any population exposed to traumatic events. Although much has been written about the management of PTSD, the concepts of resilience and vulnerability have not received the same attention. This article reviews the conceptualisation, epidemiology and comorbidities of PTSD and highlights the factors underlying vulnerability and conveying resilience.

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References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Post-traumatic stress disorder, resilience and vulnerability

  • Ayesha S. Ahmed
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