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A Sociohistorical Study of the Development of Entrepreneurship Among the Ijebu of Western Nigeria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 May 2014

E. O. Akeredolu-Ale*
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

Extract

Lagos, at present the political capital of Nigeria and the nerve centre of the country's economy, has been the meeting point for the commercial talent of Yorubaland since the opening of the port to trade with Western Europe. From the start, that trade had inspired and depended upon the activities of a large number of middlemen who linked the expatriate merchant firms in the principal coastal market towns with the young but promising Nigerian market in the hinterland. These indigenous traders, the first generation to take advantage of the, new economic opportunities, came from all the main Yoruba subcultural groups. But, as several historical accounts have shown (see among others Johnson 1921, Forde 1951, Bauer 1954), the Ijebu have turned out more prominently in the process and have distinguished themselves as commercial entrepreneurs above other Yoruba subcultural groups.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © African Studies Association 1973

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References

References Cited

Akeredolu-Ale, E. O. Nigerian Entrepreneurs in the Lagos State: A Study in the Origins and Performance of Indigenous Business Leadership in a Young Economy. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of London, 1971.Google Scholar
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