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The determinants of receiving social care in later life in England

  • A. VLACHANTONI (a1) (a2) (a3), R. J. SHAW (a1), M. EVANDROU (a1) (a2) (a3) and J. FALKINGHAM (a1) (a2)
Abstract

Demographic change and policy changes in social care provision can affect the type of social care support received by older people, whether through informal, formal state or formal paid-for sources. This paper analyses the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing data (wave 4) in order to examine the relationship between demographic and socio-economic characteristics, and the receipt of support from different sources by older people who report difficulty with daily activities. The research outlines three key results with implications for the future organisation of social care for older people. Firstly, the number of instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) an older person reports having difficulty with, followed by the number of activities of daily living (ADLs) are the strongest determinants of receiving support from any source. Secondly, there are significant gender differences in the factors associated with receiving support from different sources; for example, physical health is a strong determinant of informal support receipt by men, while mental health status is a strong determinant of informal support receipt by women. Finally, the research shows that different kinds of impediments in everyday life are associated with receiving support from different sources. This ‘link’ between particular types of difficulties and support receipt from particular sources raises questions about the way social care provision can or should be organised in the future.

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Copyright
The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution licence .
Corresponding author
Address for correspondence: Athina Vlachantoni, EPSRC Care Life Cycle, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK. E-mail: a.vlachantoni@soton.ac.uk
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Ageing & Society
  • ISSN: 0144-686X
  • EISSN: 1469-1779
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