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The Impact of the Canada-U.S. Hog/Pork Trade Dispute on the Composition of U.S. Pork Imports

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2016

Bruno Larue
Affiliation:
The Département d'Économie Rurale, Université Laval, Ste-Foy, Québec, Canada
Jean-Philippe Gervais
Affiliation:
Department of Economics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa
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Abstract

Trade theorists have demonstrated that different trade policy instruments have different effects on the quality and source of imports. Countervailing duties (CVDs), like specific tariffs, should induce quality upgrading. However, the magnitude and timing of the quality adjustments are influenced by the credibility of the duties that can be legally contested and modified after annual administrative reviews. Index numbers are used to assess the timing and magnitude of the product mix and country mix substitution effects in U.S. pork imports in response to the U.S. CVDs on Canadian exports of live hogs and fresh, chilled, and frozen pork.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association 

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The Impact of the Canada-U.S. Hog/Pork Trade Dispute on the Composition of U.S. Pork Imports
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