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Trilobal Eccentrics at Teotihuacan and Tula

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Terrance L. Stocker
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, Southern Illinois University
Michael W. Spence
Affiliation:
Department of Anthropology, University of Western Ontario

Abstract

M-shaped eccentrics at Teotihuacan and Tula are interpreted as being the trilobal element, a symbol for water and blood. This element, represented in chipped stone, mural art, and low relief carving at both sites, argues for considerable cultural continuity between Teotihuacan and Tula. Not only the symbol, but to some degree its socio-ideological context, must have persisted from Teotihuacan times into the late Toltec period.

Type
Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Society for American Archaeology 1973

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