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Donor Rules or Donors Rule? International Institutions and Political Corruption

  • Emilie M. Hafner-Burton (a1) and Christina J. Schneider (a2)

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Political corruption is a massive barrier to economic development and good governance. International institutions have become leaders in the effort to combat the problem. A growing number of such institutions have crafted official anticorruption rules, procedures and policies designed to deter the abuse of power within their membership and within institutional practice. Despite these regulatory developments, little is known about the role these institutions play in influencing corruption or whether the growing set of governance rules now in place have any effect.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

References

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1 Emilie M. Hafner-Burton & Christina J. Schneider, A Dark Side of Cooperation: When International Organizations Spread Political Corruption, Int'l Studs. Q. (forthcoming 2019).

2 Jakob Svensson, Eight Questions About Corruption, 19(3) J. Econ Perspectives 19 (Summer 2005).

3 See Alejandro Posadas, Combating Corruption Under International Law, 10 Duke J. Comp. & Int'l L. 345 (2000).

4 World Bank Group, People and Development: Annual Meetings Address by James D. Wolfensohn, President, Report No. 99712 (Oct. 1, 1996). We define IDOs as intergovernmental organizations that provide regional or international development aid or technical assistance.

5 Members include states like Angola, ranked 167th out of 180 states for corruption by Transparency International in 2017, the Democratic Republic of Congo (ranked 161st), Zimbabwe (ranked 157th), Madagascar (ranked 155th), and Mozambique (ranked 153rd).

8 OSISA Report: Efficacy of SADC's Anti-Corruption Bodies, Corruption Watch (Aug. 12, 2017).

9 Chantelle de Sousa, Combating Corruption in the SADC, DeRebus (Apr. 1, 2015).

11 People and Corruption: Africa Survey 2015, Transparency Int'l (2015). The estimates were created in partnership with Afrobarometer, which canvased 43,143 people across 28 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

15 Pamela Paxton & Stephen Knack, Individual and Country-Level Factors Affecting Support for Foreign Aid, 33 Int'l Pol. Sci. Rev. 171, 186 (2011); Thomas Knecht, Paying Attention to Foreign Affairs (2010).

16 Monika Bauhr et al., Does Corruption Cause Aid Fatigue? Public Opinion and the Aid Corruption Paradox, 57 Int'l Studs. Q. 568 (2013).

17 Bruce Bueno de Mesquita et al., The Logic of Political Survival (2003).

18 See James Wolfensohn, People and Development: Speeches of World Bank Presidents (Oct. 1996).

19 Lauren Ferry, Emilie M. Hafner-Burton & Christina J. Schneider, Catch Me if you Care: When Development Organizations Punish National Corruption (2019) (unpublished manuscript).

Donor Rules or Donors Rule? International Institutions and Political Corruption

  • Emilie M. Hafner-Burton (a1) and Christina J. Schneider (a2)

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