Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-q6bj7 Total loading time: 0.213 Render date: 2022-12-06T19:59:59.016Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Expertise and Scale of Conflict: Governments as Advocates in American Indian Politics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 October 2011

LAURA E. EVANS*
Affiliation:
University of Washington
*
Laura E. Evans is Assistant Professor, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs, University of Washington, Box 353055, Seattle, WA 98105-3055 (evansle@uw.edu).

Abstract

How do American Indian tribal governments relate to nearby local governments? Do insights gleaned from these cases illuminate the constraints and opportunities that marginalized groups face within any system of federalism? What circumstances of marginalized governments help or hinder their effectiveness? Although some Native American tribes have transformed their fortunes with highly profitable casinos, most continue to face stark disadvantages. Some tribal governments, despite limited opportunities prevail locally by cultivating policy and political expertise. This analysis demonstrates that such expertise can be developed, even when resources are scarce.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Alfred, Taiaiake. 1999. Peace, Power, Righteousness: An Indigenous Manifesto. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Ashley, Jeffrey S., and Hubbard, Secody J.. 2004. Negotiated Sovereignty: Working to Improve Tribal–State Relations. Westport, CT: Praeger.Google Scholar
Barfield, Chet. 2001. “Casinos Force Tribes, Counties to Sit Down at the Same Table.” San Diego Union–Tribune. 24 June, B1.Google Scholar
Berman, David R., and Salant, Tanis J.. 1998. “Minority Representation, Resistance, and Public Policy: The Navajos and the Counties.” Publius 28 (4): 83104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Biolsi, Thomas. 1992. Organizing the Lakota: The Political Economy of the New Deal on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
Biolsi, Thomas. 2001. “Deadliest Enemies”: Law and the Making of Race Relations on and off Rosebud Reservation. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Bobo, Lawrence D., and Tuan, Mia. 2006. Prejudice in Politics: Group Position, Public Opinion, and the Wisconsin Treaty Rights Dispute. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Boehmke, Frederick J., and Witmer, Richard. 2002. “Resource Accumulation and Political Lobbying: The Empowerment of Native Americans through Gaming Revenue.” Working Paper. University of Iowa.Google Scholar
Bourland, Gregg. 1992. Videotaped remarks at Tribal Politics and Government in South Dakota: Variables Associated with Success and Failure. Series: Tribal Government Awareness, Bush Faculty Development Project. Hosted and videotaped by South Dakota State University, 21 April.Google Scholar
Browning, Rufus P., Dale Rogers Marshall, and Tabb, David H., eds. 1997. Racial Politics in American Cities. New York: Longman.Google Scholar
Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior. 1992–1999. “Justification of the Budget Estimates.” In Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations: Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
Clemens, Elisabeth S. 1997. The People's Lobby. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Cornell, Stephen, and Kalt, Joseph. 1992. What Can Tribes Do? Strategies and Institutions in American Indian Economic Development. American Indian Studies Center; University of California, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
Cournoyer, Steve. 1990. Videotaped remarks at Consider the Century: Native American Perspectives on the Past 100 Years. Hosted and videotaped by South Dakota State University.Google Scholar
Deloria, Vine Jr. 1970. We Talk, You Listen: New Tribes, New Turf. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
Deloria, Vine Jr., and Lytle, Clifford M.. 1984. The Nations Within. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Deloria, Vine Jr., and Wilkins, David E.. 1999. Tribes, Treaties and Constitutional Tribulations. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Emery, Steven C. Sr. 1992. Videotaped remarks at Consider the Century: Native American Perspectives on the Past 100 Years. Hosted and videotaped by South Dakota State University, 30 October.Google Scholar
“Flexing Too Much Muscle?” 2000. Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington), 25 December, A1.Google Scholar
Ganz, Marshall. 2000. “Resources and Resourcefulness: Strategic Capacity in the Unionization of California Agriculture, 1959–1966.” American Journal of Sociology 105 (4): 1003–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Groark, Virginia. 2001. “First One Casino, Then Two. Now What?” New York Times, 2 September, 14CN-1.Google Scholar
Hall, Richard L., and Deardorff, Alan V.. 2006. “Lobbying as Legislative Subsidy.” American Political Science Review 100 (1): 6984.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hansen, Dan. 2002. “Tribes Take Bigger Role in Dam-related Issues.” Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Washington), 26 March, A1.Google Scholar
Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. 2007. Honoring Nations: A Directory of Honored Programs. http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/hpaied/documents/Dir_web.pdf (accessed December 1, 2007).Google Scholar
Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. 2008. The State of the Native Nations. New York: Oxford University Press.Google ScholarPubMed
Henson, E. C., Taylor, J., Bean, S., Bishop, K., Black, S. S., Grant, K. W., Jorgensen, M. R., King, J., Lee, A. J., Nelson, H., and Roubideaux, Y.. 2002. Native America at the New Millennium. Cambridge, MA: American Indian Research and Grants Assessment Project, Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.Google Scholar
Katzenstein, Mary Fainsod. 1998. Faithful and Fearless: Moving Feminist Protest inside The Church and Military. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Lawrence, Elden. 1992. Videotaped remarks at Tribal Government Challenges for the Future: Effectiveness, Legitimacy, Sovereignty, Jurisdiction. Series: Tribal Government Awareness, Bush Faculty Development Project. Hosted and videotaped by South Dakota State University, 21 April.Google Scholar
Lopach, James L., Margery Hunter Brown, and Clow, Richmond L.. 1998. Tribal Government Today: Politics on Montana Indian Reservations. Niwot: University Press of Colorado.Google Scholar
Mason, W. Dale. 2000. Indian Gaming. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.Google Scholar
McAdam, Doug. 1982. Political Processes and the Development of the Black Insurgency, 1930–1970. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
McCarthy, John D., and Zald, Mayer N.. 1977. “Resource Mobilization and Social Movements: A Partial Theory.” American Journal of Sociology 82 (6): 1212–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McClure, Robert. 2001. “Tribes Reignite Legal Battle over State's Fish Catch.” Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 17 January, A1.Google Scholar
McCool, Daniel, Olson, Susan M., and Robinson, Jennifer L.. 2007. Native Vote: American Indians, the Voting Rights Act, and the Right to Vote. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morris, Aldon D. 1984. The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
National Indian Gaming Commission. 2006. Gaming Revenues 2006–2001. http://www.nigc.gov/Portals/0/NIGC%20Uploads/Tribal%20Data/gamingrevenues2006.pdf (accessed December 1, 2007).Google Scholar
O'Brien, Sharon. 1989. American Indian Tribal Governments. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.Google Scholar
Orr, Marion. 1999. Black Social Capital: The Politics of School Reform in Baltimore, 1986–1998. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas.Google Scholar
Peterson, Dan. 1987. “A Study of the Relative Contribution of Selected Sociocultural and Personality Variables to the Explanation of Prejudice and Discrimination in South Dakota.” Ph.D. diss. South Dakota State University.Google Scholar
Piven, Frances Fox, and Cloward, Richard A.. 1977. Poor People's Movements. New York: Pantheon Books.Google Scholar
Polsby, Nelson W. 1968. “The Institutionalization of the U.S. House of Representatives.” American Political Science Review 62 (1): 144–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruby, Robert H., and Brown, John A.. 1992. A Guide to the Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.Google Scholar
“Slam of Indians Challenged.” 1990. Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota), 6 September, 1.Google Scholar
South Dakota Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Human Rights. 2000. Native Americans: An Erosion of Confidence in the Justice System. http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/sac/sd0300/main.htm (accessed December 1, 2007).Google Scholar
Stinchcombe, Arthur L. 1990. Information and Organizations. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Stone, Clarence N. 1989. Regime Politics. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas.Google Scholar
Sturtevant, William C., ed. 1978–2001. Handbook of North American Indians. Volumes 7–13. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution.Google Scholar
Taylor, Lee. 1992. Videotaped remarks at Tribal Politics and Government in South Dakota: Variables Associated with Success and Failure. Series: Tribal Government Awareness, Bush Faculty Development Project. Hosted and videotaped by South Dakota State University, 21 April.Google Scholar
Tiller, Veronica E. Velarde. 1996. Tiller's Guide to Indian Country: Economic Profiles of American Indian Reservations. Albuquerque, NM: BowArrow.Google Scholar
Turner, Dale A. 2006. This Is Not a Peace Pipe: Towards a Critical Indigenous Philosophy. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google ScholarPubMed
U.S. Census Bureau. 2008. Local Governments and Public School Systems by Type and State: 2007. http://www.census.gov/govs/cog/GovOrgTab03ss.html (accessed December 18, 2008).Google Scholar
Velandra, Paul. 1992. Videotaped remarks at Consider the Century: Native American Perspectives on the Past 100 Years. Hosted and videotaped by South Dakota State University, 30 October.Google Scholar
Walker, James R. 1982. Lakota Society, ed. Raymond J. DeMallie. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
Warren, Mark R. 2001. Dry Bones Rattling: Community Building to Revitalize American Democracy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilkins, David E. 2002. American Indian Politics and the American Political System. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.Google Scholar
Wissler, Clark. 1912. Societies and Ceremonial Associations in the Oglala Division of the Teton-Dakota. Anthropological Papers 11 (1): 199.Google Scholar
Wray, Jacilee, ed. 2002. Native Peoples of the Olympic Peninsula: Who We Are. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.Google Scholar
19
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Expertise and Scale of Conflict: Governments as Advocates in American Indian Politics
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Expertise and Scale of Conflict: Governments as Advocates in American Indian Politics
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Expertise and Scale of Conflict: Governments as Advocates in American Indian Politics
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *