Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4hcbs Total loading time: 0.208 Render date: 2021-12-05T00:20:11.282Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Life-Cycle Transitions and Political Participation: The Case of Marriage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2013

Laura Stoker
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
M. Kent Jennings
Affiliation:
University of California, Santa Barbara; University of Michigan

Abstract

We investigate the consequences of changes in marital status for political participation, treating marital status as marking points of continuity and transition in an individual's life history and marriage as a setting that fosters interaction and interdependence between marital partners. The analysis is based on panel and pseudopanel data from the 1965–82 socialization study of parents, offspring, and spouses. We find that marital transitions affect participation in four ways: (1) marital partners adjust their activity levels to become more like each other after marriage; (2) marital transitions of any type, especially marriage among younger people, tend to depress participation; (3) the overall effect of marriage, however, is powerfully mediated by the participation level of the partner; and (4) these mediation effects are greatest for political activities that involve collective efforts or draw upon the couple's joint resources.

Type
Research Notes
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Beck, Paul Allen. 1991. “Voters Intermediation Environments in the 1988 Presidential Contest.” Public Opinion Quarterly 55:371–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, Donald T., and Stanley, Julian C.. 1963. Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs for Research. Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
De Leeuw, Edith D. 1992. Data Quality in Mail, Telephone, and Face to Face Surveys. Amsterdam: TT Publikaties.Google Scholar
Eulau, Heinz. 1986. Politics, Self, and Society. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Giles, Michael, and Dantico, Marilyn K.. 1982. “Political Participation and Neighborhood Context Revisited.” American Journal of Political Science 26:144–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huckfeldt, Robert. 1979. “Political Participation and Neighborhood Social Context.” American Journal of Political Science 23:579–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huckfeldt, Robert. 1986. Politics in Context. New York: Agathon.Google Scholar
Huckfeldt, Robert, and Sprague, John. 1987. “Networks in Context: The Social Flow of Political Information.” American Political Science Review 81:11971216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jennings, M. Kent, and Markus, Gregory B.. 1984. “Partisan Orientations over the Long Haul: Results from the Three-Wave Political Socialization Panel Study.” American Political Science Review 78:10001018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jennings, M. Kent, and Niemi, Richard G.. 1971. “The Division of Political Labor between Mothers and Fathers.” American Political Science Review 65:6992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jennings, M. Kent, and Stoker, Laura. 1992. “Intimate Social Contexts and Political Change: A Cross-Generational, Longitudinal Study.” Presented at the annual meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Francisco.Google Scholar
Kenny, Christopher B. 1992. “Political Participation and Effects from the Social Environment.” American Journal of Political Science 36:259–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenny, Christopher B. 1993. “The Microenvironment of Political Participation.” American Politics Quarterly 21:223–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kingston, Paul William, and Finkel, Steven. 1987. “Is There a Marriage Gap in Politics?Journal of Marriage and the Family 49:5764.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leighley, Jan E. 1990. “Social Interaction and Contextual Influences on Political Participation.” American Politics Quarterly 18:459–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacKuen, Michael, and Brown, Courtney. 1987. “Political Context and Attitude Change.” American Political Science Review 81:471–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marsden, Peter V. 1987. “Core Discussion Networks of Americans.” American Sociological Review 52:122–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Michigan University of Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center. 1968. American National Election Study Codebook. ICPSR Study 7281. Ann Arbor: Michigan.Google Scholar
Milbrath, Lester W., and Goel, M. L.. 1977. Political Participation. Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
Petrocik, John R., and Shaw, Daron. 1991. “Non-voting in America: Attitudes in Context.” In Political Participation and American Democracy, ed. Crotty, William. New York: Greenwood.Google Scholar
Straits, Bruce C. 1990. “The Social Context of Voter Turnout.” Public Opinion Quarterly 54:6473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Straits, Bruce C. 1991. “Bringing Strong Ties Back In: Interpersonal Gateways to Political Information and Influence.” Public Opinion Quarterly 55:432–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Teixeira, Ruy. 1987. Why Americans Don't Vote. New York: Greenwood.Google Scholar
Weatherford, M. Stephen. 1982. “Interpersonal Networks and Political Behavior.” American Journal of Political Science 26:117–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolfinger, Raymond E., and Rosenstone, Steven. 1980. Who Votes? New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
158
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Life-Cycle Transitions and Political Participation: The Case of Marriage
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Life-Cycle Transitions and Political Participation: The Case of Marriage
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Life-Cycle Transitions and Political Participation: The Case of Marriage
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *