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Somatomedin C in dairy cows related to energy and protein supply and to milk production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2010

H. Ronge
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition Pathology, Institute of Animal Breeding, University of Berne, School of Veterinary Medicine, 3012 Berne, Switzerland
J. Blum
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition Pathology, Institute of Animal Breeding, University of Berne, School of Veterinary Medicine, 3012 Berne, Switzerland
C. Clement
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition Pathology, Institute of Animal Breeding, University of Berne, School of Veterinary Medicine, 3012 Berne, Switzerland
F. Jans
Affiliation:
Federal Research Station for Animal Production, Grangeneuve, 1725 Posieux, Switzerland
H. Leuenberger
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science, Federal Institute of Technology, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
H. Binder
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Breeding, University of Zurich, School of Veterinary Medicine, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland
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Abstract

Somatomedin C and other hormones, as well as blood metabolites, were measured during the dry period and during lactation in dairy cows, given different amounts of energy and protein, to study metabolic and endocrine adaptations. Somatomedin C, specifically measured by radioimmunoassay after separation from its binding protein, did not exhibit typical diurnal variations, in contrast to somatotropin and insulin, which increased particularly after concentrate intake. Somatomedin C markedly decreased at parturition and reached lowest values around the peak of lactation, while levels of somatotropin, nonesterified fatty acids and ketone bodies were high and those of glucose, insulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine were low. Thereafter somatomedin C values slowly increased up to the 12th week of lactation and remained elevated. Low energy and protein balances were characterized by particularly low somatomedin C concentrations. An additional protein deficit at peak lactation, when cows were already provided with low amounts of energy, did not further decrease somatomedin C levels. However, when high amounts of energy were given in the form of starch or crystalline fat, somatomedin C increased. Overall, there was a positive correlation of somatomedin C primarily with energy, but also with protein balances and a negative correlation with milk yield. Conversely, somatotropin increased markedly after parturition and was positively correlated with milk production and negatively with protein and energy balances. Thus, somatomedin C levels were paradoxically low in the presence of high circulating somatotropin. Insulin most closely paralleled somatomedin C levels. Therefore the anabolic state of metabolism at the end of pregnancy was characterized by high somatomedin C and insulin and relatively low somatotropin, whereas the catabolic state of early lactation was characterized by high somatotropin, low somatomedin C, insulin and thyroid hormones.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © British Society of Animal Science 1988

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