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Influence of vitamins A, D3 and E status on post-mortem meat quality in steers under winter housing or pasture finishing systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 February 2011

T. Turner*
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7051, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
J. Pickova
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7051, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
P. Ertbjerg
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
H. Lindqvist
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 234, 532 23 Skara, Sweden
E. Nadeau
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 234, 532 23 Skara, Sweden
L. Hymøller
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Health and Bioscience, Aarhus University, PO Box 50, 8830, Tjele, Denmark
K. Lundström
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7051, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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Abstract

We investigated the influence of Swedish recommended vitamins A, D3 and E supplementation levels on muscle tenderness and fatty acid (FA) composition under indoor or outdoor finishing programmes. Swedish Red breed steer calves were divided into vitamin supplemented (n = 12) and non-supplemented (n = 15) groups while on pasture prior to the finishing period. This trial began at the beginning of the winter housing period during which the steers were fed a 55 : 45 dry matter barley : grass silage diet indoors. The indoor finished group was comprised of vitamin supplemented (n = 6) and non-supplemented (n = 8) steers slaughtered after about 155 days on feed. Vitamin supplemented steers were provided with 100 g mineral supplement providing 400 000 IU vitamin A, 100 000 IU D3 and 3000 IU E daily as recommended for Swedish production practices. In spring, outdoor finished vitamin supplemented (n = 6) and non-supplemented (n = 7) steers grazed semi-natural grassland for an additional 120 days before slaughter. During pasture, vitamin supplemented steers had free-choice access to a mineral supplement containing vitamins A, D3 and E. The mineral supplement for the non-supplemented steers did not contain vitamins A, D3 and E and was provided at the same amount as the vitamin supplemented steers. Shear force values were similar between vitamin supplemented and non-supplemented steers after ageing 2, 7 and 14 days within indoor and outdoor finishing programmes. The shear force values had decreased by 14 days of ageing within all programmes. The μ- and m-calpain activity did not differ between vitamin supplemented and non-supplemented steers for either the indoor or outdoor finishing programmes. The calpastatin activity was higher for the indoor, vitamin supplemented steers. Indoor finished vitamin supplemented steers had a greater proportion of C18:1c-9 and total monounsaturated fatty acids, whereas the non-supplemented steers had a greater proportion of total saturated fatty acids. We concluded that the meat quality from steers not receiving vitamin supplementation was similar to that of steers receiving vitamins A, D3 and E supplementation at Swedish recommended levels under indoor and outdoor finishing programmes.

Type
Full Paper
Information
animal , Volume 5 , Issue 7 , 31 May 2011 , pp. 1141 - 1148
Copyright
Copyright © The Animal Consortium 2011

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