Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 11
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Scales, Kylie L. Miller, Peter I. Ingram, Simon N. Hazen, Elliott L. Bograd, Steven J. Phillips, Richard A. and Thuiller, Wilfried 2016. Identifying predictable foraging habitats for a wide-ranging marine predator using ensemble ecological niche models. Diversity and Distributions, Vol. 22, Issue. 2, p. 212.


    Fletcher, Lee Norman Coimbra, João Paulo Rodger, Jennifer Potter, Ian C. Gill, Howard S. Dunlop, Sarah A. and Collin, Shaun P. 2014. Classification of retinal ganglion cells in the southern hemisphere lampreyGeotria australis(Cyclostomata). Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 522, Issue. 4, p. 750.


    Hedd, April Regular, P. M. Montevecchi, W. A. Buren, A. D. Burke, C. M. and Fifield, D. A. 2009. Going deep: common murres dive into frigid water for aggregated, persistent and slow-moving capelin. Marine Biology, Vol. 156, Issue. 4, p. 741.


    Cocking, Lisa J. Double, Michael C. Milburn, Peter J. and Brando, Vittorio E. 2008. Seabird bycatch mitigation and blue-dyed bait: A spectral and experimental assessment. Biological Conservation, Vol. 141, Issue. 5, p. 1354.


    Phillips, R. A. Croxall, J. P. Silk, J. R. D. and Briggs, D. R. 2007. Foraging ecology of albatrosses and petrels from South Georgia: two decades of insights from tracking technologies. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, Vol. 17, Issue. S1, p. S6.


    Xavier, J. C. and Croxall, J. P. 2007. Predator-prey interactions: why do larger albatrosses eat bigger squid?. Journal of Zoology, Vol. 271, Issue. 4, p. 408.


    Catry, Paulo Phillips, Richard A. and Croxall, John P. 2004. Sustained Fast Travel by a Gray-Headed Albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma) Riding an Antarctic Storm. The Auk, Vol. 121, Issue. 4, p. 1208.


    Catry, Paulo Phillips, Richard A. and Croxall, John P. 2004. SUSTAINED FAST TRAVEL BY A GRAY-HEADED ALBATROSS (THALASSARCHE CHRYSOSTOMA) RIDING AN ANTARCTIC STORM. The Auk, Vol. 121, Issue. 4, p. 1208.


    Spear, Larry B. Ainley, David G. and Webb, Sophie W. 2003. Distribution, abundance and behaviour of Buller’s, Chatham Island and Salvin's Albatrosses off Chile and Peru. Ibis, Vol. 145, Issue. 2, p. 253.


    Croxall, J.P. and Wood, A.G. 2002. The importance of the Patagonian Shelf for top predator species breeding at South Georgia. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, Vol. 12, Issue. 1, p. 101.


    Nel, Deon C. Nel, Jeanne L. Ryan, Peter G. Klages, Norbert T.W. Wilson, Rory P. and Robertson, Graham 2000. Foraging ecology of grey-headed mollymawks at Marion Island, southern Indian Ocean, in relation to longline fishing activity. Biological Conservation, Vol. 96, Issue. 2, p. 219.


    ×

Diving behaviour of the grey-headed albatross

  • N. Huin (a1) and P.A. Prince (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954102097000321
  • Published online: 01 May 2004
Abstract

Foraging grey-headed albatrosses spent 86% of the night but only 20% of the day sitting on the sea; most diving activity occurred during daylight. During the broad-guard period of nesting, peaks of diving activity occurred at midday and dusk. During the subsequent chick-rearing period, however, diving was mainly at dawn and dusk. Of 485 dives measured, the depth averaged 0.74 m, with maximum depth at 6.5 m. On average grey-headed albatrosses dived 24 times during a five day foraging trip. Dive depths increased towards midday, probably as a function of the birds' visual acuity rather than due to vertical migration of their prey. We estimate that grey-headed albatrosses may obtain 30–45% of their daily food requirements by diving.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Diving behaviour of the grey-headed albatross
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Diving behaviour of the grey-headed albatross
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Diving behaviour of the grey-headed albatross
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Corresponding author, e-mail: papr@pcmail.nerc-bas.ac.uk
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Antarctic Science
  • ISSN: 0954-1020
  • EISSN: 1365-2079
  • URL: /core/journals/antarctic-science
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: