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    Thatje, S. 2012. Effects of Capability for Dispersal on the Evolution of Diversity in Antarctic Benthos. Integrative and Comparative Biology, Vol. 52, Issue. 4, p. 470.


    Janosik, Alexis M. Mahon, Andrew R. and Halanych, Kenneth M. 2011. Evolutionary history of Southern Ocean Odontaster sea star species (Odontasteridae; Asteroidea). Polar Biology, Vol. 34, Issue. 4, p. 575.


    MAH, CHRISTOPHER and FOLTZ, DAVID 2011. Molecular phylogeny of the Forcipulatacea (Asteroidea: Echinodermata): systematics and biogeography. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, Vol. 162, Issue. 3, p. 646.


    Heimeier, D. Lavery, S. and Sewell, M. A. 2010. Molecular Species Identification of Astrotoma agassizii from Planktonic Embryos: Further Evidence for a Cryptic Species Complex. Journal of Heredity, Vol. 101, Issue. 6, p. 775.


    Cannon, Johanna T. Rychel, Amanda L. Eccleston, Heather Halanych, Kenneth M. and Swalla, Billie J. 2009. Molecular phylogeny of hemichordata, with updated status of deep-sea enteropneusts. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Vol. 52, Issue. 1, p. 17.


    Foltz, David W. and Mah, Christopher L. 2009. Recent relaxation of purifying selection on the tandem-repetitive early-stage histone H3 gene in brooding sea stars. Marine Genomics, Vol. 2, Issue. 2, p. 113.


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Short Note: Life history of the Antarctic sea star Labidiaster annulatus (Asteroidea: Labidiasteridae) revealed by DNA barcoding

  • Alexis M. Janosik (a1), Andrew R. Mahon (a1), Rudolf S. Scheltema (a2) and Kenneth M. Halanych (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954102008001533
  • Published online: 01 September 2008
Abstract

Labidiaster annulatus, Sladen (1889) is a multi-rayed (9–50) voracious Antarctic sea star with numerous large, conspicuous crossed pedicellariae. An active and opportunistic predator, it commonly preys upon euphausiids, amphipods, and small fish in the water column (Dearborn et al. 1991). Labidiaster annulatus is distributed around the Antarctic, Kerguelen, South Orkney, South Sandwich Islands, South Georgia, and Shag Rocks, at recorded depths of 30–440 m (Fisher 1940, unpublished data).

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*corresponding author:ken@auburn.edu
Linked references
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

D.W. Foltz 1997. Hybridization frequency is negatively correlated with divergence time of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in a sea star (Leptasterias spp.) species complex. Evolution, 51, 283288.

R.L. Hunter & K.M. Halanych 2008. Evaluating connectivity in the brooding brittle star Astrotoma agassizii across the Drake Passage. Journal of Heredity, 99, 137148.

J.S. Pearse , J.B. McClintock & I. Bosch 1991. Reproduction of Antarctic benthic marine invertebrates: tempos, modes and timing. American Zoologist, 31, 6580.

M.F. Strathmann & R.R. Strathmann 2007. An extraordinarily long larval duration of 4.5 years from hatching to metamorphosis for teleplanic veligers of Fusitriton oregonensis. Biological Bulletin, 213, 152159.

J.M. Waters , P.M. O'Loughlin & M.S. Roy 2004. Cladogenesis in a starfish species complex from southern Australia: evidence for vicariant speciation? Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 32, 236245.

N.G. Wilson , R.L. Hunter , S.J. Lockhart & K.M. Halanych 2007. Multiple lineages and absence of panmixia in the Antarctic ‘circumpolar’ crinoid Promachocrinus kerguelensis from the Atlantic sector of Antarctica. Marine Biology, 152, 895904.

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Antarctic Science
  • ISSN: 0954-1020
  • EISSN: 1365-2079
  • URL: /core/journals/antarctic-science
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