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    Baroni, C. 2013. Treatise on Geomorphology.


    Wolff, E. W. 2013. Ice sheets and nitrogen. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 368, Issue. 1621, p. 20130127.


    Knight, Marina I. Nunes, Matthew A. and Nason, Guy P. 2012. Spectral estimation for locally stationary time series with missing observations. Statistics and Computing, Vol. 22, Issue. 4, p. 877.


    Sgherza, Ciaran Cullen, Louise E. and Grierson, Pauline F. 2010. Climate relationships with tree-ring width and δ13C of threeCallitrisspecies from semiarid woodlands in south-western Australia. Australian Journal of Botany, Vol. 58, Issue. 3, p. 175.


    Bigg, G. R Cunningham, C. W Ottersen, G. Pogson, G. H Wadley, M. R and Williamson, P. 2008. Ice-age survival of Atlantic cod: agreement between palaeoecology models and genetics. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 275, Issue. 1631, p. 163.


    Guzmán, M. I. Hoffmann, M. R. and Colussi, A. J. 2007. Photolysis of pyruvic acid in ice: Possible relevance to CO and CO2ice core record anomalies. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, Issue. D10,


    Wolff, Eric W. Hutterli, Manuel A. and Jones, Anna E. 2007. Past atmospheric composition and chemistry from ice cores – progress and prospects. Environmental Chemistry, Vol. 4, Issue. 4, p. 211.


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Understanding the past-climate history from Antarctica

  • ERIC W. WOLFF (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954102005002919
  • Published online: 18 November 2005
Abstract

Antarctic ice cores have become a unique and powerful resource for studies of climate change. They contain information on past climate, on forcing factors such as greenhouse gas concentrations, and on numerous other environmental parameters. For recent centuries, sites with high snow accumulation are chosen. They have, for example, provided the only direct evidence that carbon dioxide concentrations have increased by over 30% over the last two centuries. They have provided key datasets for other greenhouse gases, and for other forcings such as solar and volcanic. Over longer timescales, the Vostok ice core has shown how greenhouse gas concentrations and climate have closely tracked one another over the last 400 000 years. Other cores have shown detailed spatial and temporal detail of climate transitions, including the Antarctic response during rapid climate events such as Dansgaard-Oeschger events. The new core from Dome C has extended the range of ice cores back beyond 800 000 years, and even older ice could be obtained in future projects.

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Antarctic Science
  • ISSN: 0954-1020
  • EISSN: 1365-2079
  • URL: /core/journals/antarctic-science
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