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Article contents

An archaeology of digital things: social, political, polemical

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 September 2021

Colleen Morgan*
Affiliation:
Department of Archaeology, University of York, UK (✉ colleen.morgan@york.ac.uk)

Abstract

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Type
Debate
Information
Antiquity , Volume 95 , Issue 384 , December 2021 , pp. 1590 - 1593
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Antiquity Publications Ltd.

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References

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