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The coming tsunami of digital artefacts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 September 2021

John Aycock*
Affiliation:
Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary, Canada (✉ aycock@ucalgary.ca)

Abstract

Contemporary life has become deeply entangled with the digital. Every day, huge quantities of data, or digital artefacts, are generated. To date, the archaeological study of these artefacts has been limited, its potential demonstrated by a few initial studies and, more recently, the emergence of archaeogaming. If archaeology seeks to understand human culture, however, the study of these digital artefacts must become mainstream. This will require collaboration with computer scientists to bring an archaeological sensibility to understanding the virtual. Ultimately, the aims and methods required resemble those that archaeologists have already developed, but require a change of mindset if they are to be widely deployed for the study of digital artefacts.

Type
Debate
Information
Antiquity , Volume 95 , Issue 384 , December 2021 , pp. 1584 - 1589
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Antiquity Publications Ltd.

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