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Critical heritage studies beyond epistemic popularism

  • Rodney Harrison (a1)
Abstract

A response to the recent debate piece in Antiquity by González-Ruibal et al., examining the role of epistemic popularism in critical heritage studies and public archaeology.

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Copyright
References
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ACHS Association of Critical Heritage Studies. n.d. Available at: http://www.criticalheritagestudies.org/ (accessed 20 September 2018).
Bennett, T., Cameron, F., Dias, N., Dibley, B., Harrison, R. & Jacknis, I.. 2017. Collecting, ordering, governing: anthropology, museums, and liberal government. Durham (NC): Duke University Press.
Breithoff, E. & Harrison, R.. 2018. From ark to bank: extinction, proxies and biocapital in ex-situ biodiversity conservation practices. International Journal of Heritage Studies. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13527258.2018.1512146
DeSilvey, C. 2017. Curated decay: heritage beyond saving. Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press.
González-Ruibal, A., González, P. & Criado-Boado, F.. 2018. Against reactionary populism: towards a new public archaeology. Antiquity 92: 507515. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.227
Harrison, R. 2013. Heritage: critical approaches. Abingdon: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199602001.013.021
Harrison, R. 2015. Beyond ‘natural’ and ‘cultural’ heritage: toward an ontological politics of heritage in the age of Anthropocene. Heritage & Society 8: 2442. https://doi.org/10.1179/2159032X15Z.00000000036
Harrison, R. 2017. Freezing seeds and making futures: endangerment, hope, security, and time in agrobiodiversity conservation practices. Culture, Agriculture, Food & Environment 39: 8089. https://doi.org/10.1111/cuag.12096
Harvey, D. 2001. Heritage pasts and heritage presents: temporality, meaning and the scope of heritage studies. International Journal of Heritage Studies 7: 319338. https://doi.org/10.1080/13581650120105534
Macdonald, S. 2013. Memorylands: heritage and identity in Europe today. Abingdon: Routledge.
Rico, T. 2016. Technology, technocracy, and the promise of ‘alternative’ heritage values, in H. Silverman, E. Waterton & S. Watson (ed.) Heritage in action: 217230. New York: Springer.
Rico, T. 2017. Stakeholder in practice: ‘us’, ‘them,’ and the problem of expertise, in C. Hillerdal, A. Karlström & C. Ojala (ed.) Archaeologies of ‘us’ and ‘them’: debating the politics of ethnicity and indigeneity in archaeology and heritage discourse: 3852. Abingdon: Routledge.
Smith, L. 2006. Uses of heritage. London: Routledge.
Smith, L. & Campbell, G. . 2018. It’s not all about archaeology. Antiquity 92: 521522. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2018.15
Waterton, E. & Smith, L.. 2010. The recognition and misrecognition of community heritage. International Journal of Heritage Studies 16(1–2): 415. https://doi.org/10.1080/13527250903441671
Winter, T. 2013. Clarifying the critical in critical heritage studies. International Journal of Heritage Studies 19: 532545. https://doi.org/10.1080/13527258.2012.720997
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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
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