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New excavations at Tappeh Asiab, Kermanshah Province, Iran

  • Hojjat Darabi (a1), Tobias Richter (a2) and Peder Mortensen (a2)
Abstract

The site of Tappeh Asiab in Iran is one of only a handful of Early Neolithic sites known from the Zagros Mountains. Discovered during Robert Braidwood's ‘Iranian Prehistory’ project, the site has seen limited publication of its early excavations. Here, the authors challenge some of the initial assumptions made about the site by discussing the first findings of renewed excavations, in the hope of substantially improving our currently limited knowledge of the Early Neolithic in this region.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence (Email: richter@hum.ku.dk)
References
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Braidwood R.J. & Howe B.. 1960. Prehistoric investigations in Iraqi Kurdistan. Chicago (IL): University of Chicago Press.
Braidwood R.J., Howe B. & Reed C.A.. 1961. The Iranian prehistoric project: new problems arise as more is learned of the first attempts at food production and settled village life. Science 133: 20082010. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.133.3469.2008
Darabi H. 2015. An introduction to the Neolithic revolution of the central Zagros, Iran. Oxford: Archaeopress.
Howe B. 1983. Karim Shahir, in Braidwood L.S., Braidwood R.J., Howe B., Reed C.A. & Watson P.J. (ed.) Prehistoric archaeology along the Zagros flanks: 23154. Chicago (IL): The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.
Nashli H.F. & Matthews R.. 2013. The Neolithisation of Iran: patterns of change and continuity, in Matthews R. & Nashli H.F. (ed.) The Neolithisation of Iran: 113. Oxford: Oxbow.
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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
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