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Polished greenstone celt caches from Ceibal: the development of Maya public rituals

  • Kazuo Aoyama (a1), Takeshi Inomata (a2), Flory Pinzón (a3) and Juan Manuel Palomo (a2)
Abstract
Abstract

Excavations at Ceibal in Guatemala have recovered numerous polished celts from contexts dating throughout the Preclassic Maya occupation of the site. The celts are made of different types of greenstone, and most were deposited in caches in public areas close to ceremonial structures. Recent study shows how deposition practices changed over time. Furthermore, microwear analysis suggests that the majority of celts did not have a practical function. It is argued, instead, that the caches of greenstone celts represent public rituals relating to the establishment of early Preclassic elites.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the same Creative Commons licence is included and the original work is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence (Email: kazuo.aoyama.1@vc.ibaraki.ac.jp)
References
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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
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