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A possible Late Pleistocene forager site from the Karaburun Peninsula, western Turkey

  • Çiler Çilingiroğlu (a1), Berkay Dinçer (a2), İsmail Baykara (a3), Ahmet Uhri (a4) and Canan Çakırlar (a5)...
Abstract

The ‘Karaburun Archaeological Survey’ project aims to illuminate the lifeways of Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene foragers in western Anatolia. A recently discovered, lithic-rich site on the Karaburun Peninsula offers new insights into a currently undocumented period of western Anatolian prehistory.

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Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence (Email: ciler.cilingiroglu.unlusoy@ege.edu.tr)
References
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Çilingiroğlu, Ç. 2017. The Aegean before and after 7000 BC dispersal: defining patterning and variability. Neo-Lithics 16: 3241.
Çilingiroğlu, Ç., Dinçer, B., Uhri, A., Gürbıyık, C., Baykara, İ. & Çakırlar, C.. 2016. New Palaeolithic and Mesolithic sites in the eastern Aegean: the Karaburun Archaeological Survey project. Antiquity Project Gallery 90(353). http://dx.doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2016.168
Efstratıou, N., Bıagı, P.; & Starnını, E.. 2014. The Epipaleolithic site of Ouriakos on the island of Lemnos and its place in the Late Pleistocene peopling of the East Mediterranean region. Adalya XVII: 124.
Erdoğan, B., Altıner, D., Güngör, T. & Özer, S.. 1990. Karaburun Yarımadasının Stratigrafisi. Maden Tetkik ve Arama Dergisi 111: 123.
Kaczanowska, M. & Kozłowskı, J. K.. 2014. The Aegean Mesolithic: material culture, chronology, networks of contacts. Eurasian Prehistory 11(1–2): 3162.
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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
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