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Tails of animism: a joint burial of humans and foxes in Pre-Pottery Neolithic Motza, Israel

  • Hagar Reshef (a1), Marie Anton (a2) (a3), Fanny Bocquentin (a4), Jacob Vardi (a5), Hamoudi Khalaily (a6), Lauren Davis (a5), Guy Bar-Oz (a7) and Nimrod Marom (a8)...

Abstract

The recent discovery of a Late/Final Pre-Pottery Neolithic B burial of an adult and two children associated with fox bones at the site of Motza, Israel, demonstrates the broader socio-cultural perspective, and possibly continued animistic world views, of Neolithic foragers at the onset of the agricultural revolution.

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*Author for correspondence (Email: hagareshef@gmail.com)

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Keywords

Tails of animism: a joint burial of humans and foxes in Pre-Pottery Neolithic Motza, Israel

  • Hagar Reshef (a1), Marie Anton (a2) (a3), Fanny Bocquentin (a4), Jacob Vardi (a5), Hamoudi Khalaily (a6), Lauren Davis (a5), Guy Bar-Oz (a7) and Nimrod Marom (a8)...

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