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Key Factors for the Development of a Culturally Appropriate Interactive Multimedia Informative Program for Aboriginal Health Workers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 January 2013

Faeka El Sayed*
Affiliation:
School of Information Systems, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Southern Queensland, QLD, Australia
Jeffrey Soar
Affiliation:
School of Information Systems, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Southern Queensland, QLD, Australia
Zoe Wang
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, Australia
*
address for correspondence: Faeka El Sayed, School of Information Systems, Faculty of Business and Law, University of Southern QueenslandQLD 4350, Australia. Email: W0106566@umail.usq.edu.au
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Abstract

This research aims to create and evaluate a model for a culturally appropriate, interactive, multimedia and informative health program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers that aims to improve the capacity to independently control their learning within an attractive learning environment. The research also aims to provide recommendations for policy development and further research. This study involved four phases: program needs assessment, identification of the key factors that should be considered in developing the CD-ROM, model development, and formative evaluation for the model. A general needs assessment as a first step in program development highlighted the presence of continuing education gaps and indicated the need for a new means to deliver a sustainable, efficient and culturally acceptable program. This article explores the second objective in this study, which is the identification of the key factors considered for developing the program. The identification began with a systematic review of the literature which served as background information, followed by qualitative semistructured interviews with diverse key stakeholders to explore their expectations and recommendations. The findings indicated that the most important key factors could be categorised under four main categories: cultural factors, information technology availability and literacy, learning aspects, and interactive multimedia factors. Cultural factors included cultural inclusivity, oral cultural, pre-existing knowledge, and Aboriginal preferred learning styles. Information technology factors concerned technology availability and literacy. Learning aspects highlighted the impact of the learning theory in model design. Interactive multimedia development factors explored included the requirements for the process, fitting and design of the program. Recommendations for program design were also provided.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2013

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