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The fire burns within: Individual motivations for self-sacrifice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 December 2018

Rima-Maria Rahal*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, 60323, Germany; Gielen Leyendecker Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, Bonn 53115, Germany. rahal.rimamaria@gmail.comhttps://rimamrahal.wordpress.com

Abstract

Extreme self-sacrifice in intergroup conflict may be driven not only by situational factors generating “fusion,” but also by interindividual differences. Social value orientation is discussed as a potential contributor to self-harming behavior outside of intergroup conflicts and to the general propensity to participate in intergroup conflict. Social value orientation may therefore also be a person-specific determinant of extreme self-sacrifice in intergroup conflict.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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