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The importance of environmental threats and ideology in explaining extreme self-sacrifice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 December 2018

Abdo Elnakouri
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1, Canada. abdo.elnakouri@uwaterloo.caian.mcgregor@uwaterloo.caigor.grossmann@uwaterloo.cahttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/about/people/aelnakouhttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/people-profiles/ian-mcgregorhttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/people-profiles/igor-grossmann
Ian McGregor
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1, Canada. abdo.elnakouri@uwaterloo.caian.mcgregor@uwaterloo.caigor.grossmann@uwaterloo.cahttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/about/people/aelnakouhttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/people-profiles/ian-mcgregorhttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/people-profiles/igor-grossmann
Igor Grossmann
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1, Canada. abdo.elnakouri@uwaterloo.caian.mcgregor@uwaterloo.caigor.grossmann@uwaterloo.cahttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/about/people/aelnakouhttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/people-profiles/ian-mcgregorhttps://uwaterloo.ca/psychology/people-profiles/igor-grossmann

Abstract

We argue that Whitehouse's group-based model neglects two key contextual variables: environmental threats and ideology. Environmental threats lead to extremism outside of group settings and predispose individuals toward joining ideologically zealous groups. Ideologies and environmental threats can also explain why certain groups adopt norms that encourage violent self-sacrifice.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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